Business English- Ending presentations politeness competition game

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (131 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Business English- Ending presentations politeness competition game

Work in groups of two or three. Choose one of the phrases below and take turns making it 
more and more formal/ polite, until you both/ all can’t take it any further. Then do the same
with other phrases. 

Summarising
Basically, there was no need for all that boring info because I can explain it all in one 
sentence, being…
Stating a conclusion
With the evidence that I’ve given you, any idiot can see that…
Ending the main part of the presentation
Well, that’s all./ So, that’s it./ Right. I’m done.
Inviting questions/ Asking for questions
Questions?/ Now ask me questions./ Okay, question time!/ Hands up for questions. 
Inviting more questions
More?/ More questions?
Encouraging people to ask questions
No questions at all? Really??/ Please ask me about…
Indicating who can ask a question (while pointing with an open hand)
Yeah, okay./ Yes?/ Yes, you./ What?/ (just pointing)/ Yes, the fat man over there. 
Checking the meaning of the question
I don’t understand what you are saying./ What?/ Say again!
Commenting on the question
Odd question!/ What a strange question!/ Oh no, not that question!
Speaking while you are pausing, e.g. for thought or to look at your notes
Wait!/ Please wait!/ Got that right here!
Mentioning what you said earlier
Don’t you remember that I said…?/ I already clearly explained in my intro that…
Not (really) answering the question because you don’t have the information
No idea./ I didn’t research that. 
Not (really) answering the question for other reasons
That’s a secret./ I can’t answer that. 
Offering to answer the question another way
Come up and speak to me later./ Catch me later on and ask me again. 
Checking if your answer was okay
Do you understand?/ Okay?/ Clear enough now?/ Need more info?
Ending the questions
Stop, stop! No more questions please!/ No more time for questions, thank goodness!
Thanking at the end
Thanks for sitting through my long boring presentation./ Thanks for putting up with me.
Showing sources of further information
After this presentation, read this./ You can email me for more info if you must.

Put the phrases on the next page into order of politeness by writing numbers next to them 
from 1 for the most casual/ informal/ impolite.  

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Mixed answers
Summarising

Basically, there was no need for all that boring info because I can explain it all in one 
sentence, being…

If I were to attempt to summarise all the things I have talked about today in one 
sentence, it would probably be…

To sum all that up…

To sum up all that I’ve told you,…

To summarise the content of my presentation,…

Stating a conclusion

Basically, all that means that…

Hopefully I have proved to you that…

I hope that has convinced at least some of you that…

I sincerely hope that I have opened your eyes to at the very least the possibility that…

With the evidence that I’ve given you, any idiot can see that…

Ending the main part of the presentation

And with those words I will bring my presentation to a close. 

Right, that’s all I want to say today. 

So, that brings me to the end of my presentation./ … which is the last thing that I 
wanted to say today.

So, that’s the end of my presentation. 

Well, that’s all./ So, that’s it./ Right. I’m done.

Inviting questions/ Asking for questions

Any questions, anyone?/ Anyone have any questions?

Any questions?

Does anyone have any questions?/ Are there any questions?/ Please put your hands 
up if you have any questions. 

I will now be delighted to answer any questions that anyone may have./ There’ll now be
a brief question and answer stage.

I’ll now be happy to answer any questions./ We now have five minutes for Q&A.  

I’ll now be very glad to answer your questions./ Please raise your hand if you’d like to 
ask a question. 

Questions?/ Now ask me questions./ Okay, question time!/ Hands up for questions. 

Inviting more questions

Any more questions?

Any more?

Does anyone have any further questions?/ Is there anything else that anyone would 
like to ask me about?

Does anyone have any more questions?/ Are there any more questions?/ Would any-
one else like to ask a question?

More?/ More questions?

Encouraging people to ask questions

Are there any questions about…?/ E.g., anyone want to ask me about…?

I imagine there might perhaps be some questions about…

No questions at all? Really??/ Please ask me about…

Would you perhaps like to ask me about…?/ Did anyone perhaps have any questions 
about…?/ For example, I’m not sure that I explained… very well.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Indicating who can ask a question (while pointing with an open hand)

Yeah, okay./ Yes?/ Yes, you./ What?/ (just pointing)/ Yes, the fat man over there. 

Yes, please ask away./ Yes, go ahead./ Yes, do you have a question?

Yes, please go ahead./ Yes, please ask your question. 

Yes, the man over there./ Yes, the woman in the red dress. 

Yes, what’s your question please?/ Yes, what would you like to know?/ Yes, the 
gentleman in the corner./ Yes, the lady in the second row?

Checking the meaning of the question

I don’t understand what you are saying./ What?/ Say again!

Sorry, could you ask me that again?/ Are you asking…?/ Do you mean…?

Sorry, could you repeat the question?/ I’m afraid I didn’t catch that./ Do you perhaps 
want to know…?/ If I understand your question correctly, you want to know…/ I’m afraid
I don’t really understand what you mean by…

Commenting on the question

Odd question!/ What a strange question!/ Oh no, not that question!

Thank you for that very interesting question.  

That’s a tricky one!/ I was hoping no one would ask me that!/ I should’ve expected that 
one!

That’s an interesting question./ That’s a difficult question./ I’m glad you asked me that./ 
I’m sure many people have the same question. 

That’s rather a difficult/ complex/ big/ deep/ philosophical question./ I’m very glad you 
asked me that. 

Speaking while you are pausing, e.g. for thought or to look at your notes

Erm. Just a mo’./ Just a sec. 

If I can just go back a couple of slides to look at that chart in more detail,… / What’s the
best way to answer that question? Well,…

Just a minute. I have the information here somewhere./ Just a second while I look at 
my notes./ Let me think./ Let me see.

Just a moment while I find the right slide./ How can I best answer that?

Wait!/ Please wait!/ Got that right here!

Mentioning what you said earlier

Don’t you remember that I said…?/ I already clearly explained in my intro that…

As I said in my introduction,…/ As I mentioned earlier,…

That’s related to my introduction, where I said…

As you might remember from the second section of my presentation,…/ As I briefly 
mentioned a few minutes ago,…/ You may remember that I showed a graph which…/ 

Not (really) answering the question because you don’t have the information

I’m afraid I didn’t research that topic in much detail because…/ I’m sorry I don’t have 
any actual data on that, but…/ I’m terribly sorry but I don’t have the exact answer to 
that question due to…

I’m afraid I didn’t research that./ I’m sorry but I don’t know the answer to that question.  

I’m sorry but I don’t really know. 

No idea./ I didn’t research that. 

Sorry, I don’t know.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Not (really) answering the question for other reasons

I hope you can understand that I’m not really able to share that information due to…

That’s a secret./ I can’t answer that. 

That’s confidential./ I’m sorry but I’m not able to answer that.

Unfortunately, I can’t really give much of an answer on that because of…/ Due to 
confidentiality concerns…

Offering to answer the question another way

Actually, it might be better for us to discuss that later in person, if you don’t mind.  

Actually, it might be better for us to discuss that later in person, if you don’t mind too 
much. 

Come up and speak to me later./ Catch me later on and ask me again. 

I’d love to be able to talk about it later./ Maybe you’d be better asking me in person 
later.

Please come up and speak to me later. 

Checking if your answer was okay

Do you understand?/ Okay?/ Clear enough now?/ Need more info?

Does that answer your question?/ Is that what you wanted to know?

Does that help?/ Is that alright?

I really hope that I have at least partly answered your question. 

Is that a bit clearer now?/ I hope I have answered your question./ I hope that answers 
your question.  

Is that answer alright?

Is that clear now?/ Alright?/ Do you need more details?

Ending the questions

I’m afraid I’ve run out time, so…/ If there are no further questions,…

Sorry but I’ve run out of time, so…/ If no one else has any questions,…

Stop, stop! No more questions please!/ No more time for questions, thank goodness!

There don’t seem to be any further questions. In that case,…/ I’m terribly sorry but I’ve 
run out of time, but…

Thanking at the end

Thank you for your kind attention.

Thank you very much for your kind attention.  

Thanks for all your great questions. 

Thanks for sitting through my long boring presentation./ Thanks for putting up with me.

Showing sources of further information

After this presentation, read this./ You can email me for more info if you must.

Here are some sources of more information./ Please email me if you’d like to know 
more. 

This slide shows some sources of further information, should you require any./ If you 
require any further information, please do not hesitate to contact me at any time. 

This slide shows some sources of further information./ Please feel free to email me if 
you’d like further information. 

Compare with the suggested answers on the next page. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Suggested answers
Summarising
1 Basically, there was no need for all that boring info because I can explain it all in one 

sentence, being…

2 To sum all that up…
3 To sum up all that I’ve told you,…
4 To summarise the content of my presentation,…
5 If I were to attempt to summarise all the things I have talked about today in one 

sentence, it would probably be…

Stating a conclusion
1 With the evidence that I’ve given you, any idiot can see that…
2 Basically, all that means that…
3 Hopefully I have proved to you that…
4 I hope that has convinced at least some of you that…
5 I sincerely hope that I have opened your eyes to at the very least the possibility that…
Ending the main part of the presentation
1 Well, that’s all./ So, that’s it./ Right. I’m done.
2 So, that’s the end of my presentation. 
3 Right, that’s all I want to say today. 
4 So, that brings me to the end of my presentation./ … which is the last thing that I 

wanted to say today.

5 And with those words I will bring my presentation to a close. 
Inviting questions/ Asking for questions
1 Questions?/ Now ask me questions./ Okay, question time!/ Hands up for questions. 
2 Any questions?
3 Any questions, anyone?/ Anyone have any questions?
4 Does anyone have any questions?/ Are there any questions?/ Please put your hands 

up if you have any questions. 

5 I’ll now be happy to answer any questions./ We now have five minutes for Q&A.  
6 I’ll now be very glad to answer your questions./ Please raise your hand if you’d like to 

ask a question. 

7 I will now be delighted to answer any questions that anyone may have./ There’ll now be

a brief question and answer stage.

Inviting more questions
1 More?/ More questions?
2 Any more?
3 Any more questions?
4 Does anyone have any more questions?/ Are there any more questions?/ Would any-

one else like to ask a question?

5 Does anyone have any further questions?/ Is there anything else that anyone would 

like to ask me about?

Encouraging people to ask questions
1 No questions at all? Really??/ Please ask me about…
2 Are there any questions about…?/ E.g., anyone want to ask me about…?
3 Would you perhaps like to ask me about…?/ Did anyone perhaps have any questions 

about…?/ For example, I’m not sure that I explained… very well.

4 I imagine there might perhaps be some questions about…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Indicating who can ask a question (while pointing with an open hand)
1 Yeah, okay./ Yes?/ Yes, you./ What?/ (just pointing)/ Yes, the fat man over there. 
2 Yes, the man over there./ Yes, the woman in the red dress. 
3 Yes, please ask away./ Yes, go ahead./ Yes, do you have a question?
4 Yes, please go ahead./ Yes, please ask your question. 
5 Yes, what’s your question please?/ Yes, what would you like to know?/ Yes, the 

gentleman in the corner./ Yes, the lady in the second row?

Checking the meaning of the question
1 I don’t understand what you are saying./ What?/ Say again!
2 Sorry, could you ask me that again?/ Are you asking…?/ Do you mean…?
3 Sorry, could you repeat the question?/ I’m afraid I didn’t catch that./ Do you perhaps 

want to know…?/ If I understand your question correctly, you want to know…/ I’m afraid
I don’t really understand what you mean by…

Commenting on the question
1 Odd question!/ What a strange question!/ Oh no, not that question!
2 That’s a tricky one!/ I was hoping no one would ask me that!/ I should’ve expected that 

one!

3 That’s an interesting question./ That’s a difficult question./ I’m glad you asked me that./ 

I’m sure many people have the same question. 

4 That’s rather a difficult/ complex/ big/ deep/ philosophical question./ I’m very glad you 

asked me that. 

5 Thank you for that very interesting question.  
Speaking while you are pausing, e.g. for thought or to look at your notes
1 Wait!/ Please wait!/ Got that right here!
2 Erm. Just a mo’./ Just a sec. 
3 Just a minute. I have the information here somewhere./ Just a second while I look at 

my notes./ Let me think./ Let me see.

4 Just a moment while I find the right slide./ How can I best answer that?
5 If I can just go back a couple of slides to look at that chart in more detail,… / What’s the

best way to answer that question? Well,…

Mentioning what you said earlier
1 Don’t you remember that I said…?/ I already clearly explained in my intro that…
2 As I said in my introduction,…/ As I mentioned earlier,…
3 That’s related to my introduction, where I said…
4 As you might remember from the second section of my presentation,…/ As I briefly 

mentioned a few minutes ago,…/ You may remember that I showed a graph which…/ 

Not (really) answering the question because you don’t have the information
1 No idea./ I didn’t research that. 
2 Sorry, I don’t know.
3 I’m sorry but I don’t really know. 
4 I’m afraid I didn’t research that./ I’m sorry but I don’t know the answer to that question.  
5 I’m afraid I didn’t research that topic in much detail because…/ I’m sorry I don’t have 

any actual data on that, but…/ I’m terribly sorry but I don’t have the exact answer to 
that question due to…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Not (really) answering the question for other reasons
1 That’s a secret./ I can’t answer that. 
2 That’s confidential./ I’m sorry but I’m not able to answer that.
3 Unfortunately, I can’t really give much of an answer on that because of…/ Due to 

confidentiality concerns…

4 I hope you can understand that I’m not really able to share that information due to…
Offering to answer the question another way
1 Come up and speak to me later./ Catch me later on and ask me again. 
2 Please come up and speak to me later. 
3 I’d love to be able to talk about it later./ Maybe you’d be better asking me in person 

later.

4 Actually, it might be better for us to discuss that later in person, if you don’t mind.  
5 Actually, it might be better for us to discuss that later in person, if you don’t mind too 

much. 

Checking if your answer was okay
1 Do you understand?/ Okay?/ Clear enough now?/ Need more info?
2 Is that clear now?/ Alright?/ Do you need more details?
3 Does that help?/ Is that alright?
4 Is that answer alright?
5 Does that answer your question?/ Is that what you wanted to know?
6 Is that a bit clearer now?/ I hope I have answered your question./ I hope that answers 

your question.  

7 I really hope that I have at least partly answered your question. 
Ending the questions
1 Stop, stop! No more questions please!/ No more time for questions, thank goodness!
2 Sorry but I’ve run out of time, so…/ If no one else has any questions,…
3 I’m afraid I’ve run out time, so…/ If there are no further questions,…
4 There don’t seem to be any further questions. In that case,…/ I’m terribly sorry but I’ve 

run out of time, but…

Thanking at the end
1 Thanks for sitting through my long boring presentation./ Thanks for putting up with me.
2 Thanks for all your great questions. 
3 Thank you for your kind attention.
4 Thank you very much for your kind attention.  
Showing sources of further information
1 After this presentation, read this./ You can email me for more info if you must.
2 Here are some sources of more information./ Please email me if you’d like to know 

more. 

3 This slide shows some sources of further information./ Please feel free to email me if 

you’d like further information. 

4 This slide shows some sources of further information, should you require any./ If you 

require any further information, please do not hesitate to contact me at any time. 

Underline useful words and expressions for being more polite/ formal above. 

How would you define formal and informal language?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Label the things below as formal (F) or informal (I):

Abbreviations

Idioms and slang

Like everyday speech

Long sentences

Long words

Polite language

Short sentences

Short words

Unlike everyday speech

Play the first game again. 

Circle all the phrases above which could be suitable for your own presentation.

Draw a star next to the best phrases above for you. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015