Business English- Meeting People- Line-by-line Brainstorming

A LESSON PLAN FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHERS

Type: Lesson Plans
Submitted by:
Published: 24th Sep 2015

Below is a preview of the 'Business English- Meeting People- Line-by-line Brainstorming' lesson plan and is automatically generated from the PDF file. While it will look close to the original, there may be formatting differences. It's provided to allow you to view the content of the lesson plan before you download the file.

      Page: /

Lesson Plan Text

Business English- Meeting People- Line-by-line Brainstorming
Cover everything except the first line of the dialogue below. Read what you can see and 
work together to think of all the possible answers to that phrase. Discuss which is the most
likely of those replies, then reveal just the response on the one line below. Do the same 
with responses to that line, then repeat one line at a time until you reach the end of the 
dialogue. 

Dialogue 1: Unarranged meeting with no previous contact – At an outside confer-
ence

Bob: Is this the right place for the seminar on “Attracting Vietnamese Students to Foreign 
Universities”?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

John: Yes, that’s right. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bob: Great. Thanks. Is this seat free?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

John: Yes, I’m pretty sure it is. Please go ahead. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bob: Thanks. There are lots of people, aren’t there?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

John: Yes, there are, aren’t there? It’s usually like this, though. Is this your first time here?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bob: Yes, it is. How about you? Have you been here before?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

John: Yes, this is my third year, actually. So, what brings you here today?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bob: We have increased our numbers of students from many Asian countries, but for some
reason we don’t have many students from Vietnam. What about you? 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Dialogue 2: Meeting a visitor who you have had email contact with but never met – 
Before a workshop at your university 
Do the same things with the dialogue below, this time between two people who have never
met but have already been in contact and so know quite a lot about each other. 

Diane: You must be Jane.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jane: That’s right. 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Diane: It’s so nice to finally to meet you, Jane. I’m Diane.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jane: Pleased to meet you too, Diane. 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Diane: Thanks for coming all this way. Did you have any trouble finding us? 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jane: No, the map that you sent was very clear, thanks. It’s a bit humid, though, isn’t it? Is 
it always like this at this time of year?

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Diane: I’m afraid so. How about Moscow? How’s the weather there now?

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jane: I’m not sure about today, but it was about 25 degrees C when I left. 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Diane: Nice! Well, I’d love to chat more but I guess you have to get to the workshop. Shall 
I show you the way?

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jane: No, that’s fine, thanks. I passed the building on the way here, so I think I can find it. 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Diane: Okay, I won’t keep you any longer, then. It was great to finally meet you. 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jane: You too. Are you coming to the party tonight?

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Diane: Of course. See you there. 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jane: Yes, see you later then. Bye. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Meeting people line by line brainstorming
Brainstorming stage

Without looking above for now, brainstorm at least two suitable phrases into each of the 
gaps below. 

Starting conversations with people who you’ve never met before

Talking about names

Expressions like “Nice to meet you”

Explaining your work and organisation

Asking about someone’s work and organisation

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Talking about coming to that place

Talking about the weather

Asking the same question back to someone

Ending the small talk (smoothly and politely)

Talking about business cards

Like “Nice to meet you” at the end of meeting

Talking about future contact between you

Look back at the model dialogues for more phrases, and use those to help come up with 
more ideas. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Talking about coming to that place
Thanks for coming all this way.
Did you have any trouble finding us?/ Did you have any problems getting here?
Where have you come from today?
How was your journey?/ How was your flight? 
Is this your first time…?
What brings you here today?

Talking about the weather
It’s a bit…, isn’t it?
Is it always like this at this time of year?
How’s the weather in… now?
(NOT It’s a fine day X)

Asking the same question back to someone
How about you?/ What about you?/ And you?

Ending the small talk (smoothly and politely)
I’d love to speak more (about…), but…/ I’d love to chat more, but…
I guess you have to…
It’s been nice to chat, but…
I know you are very busy, so…
I have to talk to a few more people, so… 
I won’t keep you any longer then./ I’ll let you get on, then.
(NOT I have another arrangement X NOT I have to go X)

Talking about business cards
Do you have a business card (on you)?
Shall I give you my business card?
Maybe we should exchange business cards. 
Just a moment while I find them/ my business cards. 
Here you are.
(And) here’s mine. 

Like “Nice to meet you” at the end of meeting
It was nice/ great/ a pleasure to meet you (too), (name).
It was great to finally meet you (too). 
(NOT Nice to meet you.) 

Talking about future contact between you
We’ll have to talk another time.
Will you be at the meal/ dinner/ party/ drinks tonight?
See you there./ See you then. 
See you later. 
I hope we have the chance to meet again soon.
I look forward to hearing from you.
I’ll email you next week.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Terms of Use

Lesson plans & worksheets can be used by teachers without any fee in the classroom; however, please ensure you keep all copyright information and references to UsingEnglish.com in place.

You will need Adobe Reader to view these files.

Get Adobe Reader