Business English Meetings- Cultural Differences

Level: Advanced

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: General

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (82 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Meetings cultural differences Guess the country

Choose one of the descriptions below and give your opinion on it. Things you could talk  
about:

How acceptable it is in your country

How universal or not it is

What other countries it is okay and not okay in

Your personal views on that matter

After guessing which one you are talking about, your partner will say how much they agree  
or disagree with what you said.

Before the meeting

Organizations are reluctant to agree to meetings with people they are unfamiliar with. 
Be prepared to provide detailed written information about your organization. 

Don’t be surprised if a meeting which was arranged well in advance is rescheduled or 
if you find out at the last minute that a specific individual will no longer attend. They 
may even wait as late as the day of the meeting before a specific time is arranged. 

They generally do not like surprises in business and want to know all they can in ad-
vance so they have time to discuss everything among themselves. Meetings are not 
considered a good time to "unveil" a new product or service.

Arrival and starting

Do not arrive too early, as they may feel embarrassed if they are not fully prepared to 
receive you. Arriving five minutes before the scheduled meeting time is generally best. 

Guests will usually be first met by the host's representative. This person will lead the 
guests into the meeting room, where the other attendees may already be waiting for 
them. 

You may be guided to a waiting room and offered tea first. Tea should not be refused. 

Meetings are almost always held in rooms specifically for business discussions, so 
don’t expect to be invited into someone's office.

Some meeting rooms consist of sofas and chairs around the edge with coffee tables 
between them. 

The highest-ranking guest should enter the room first. All other guests should then en-
ter in order of rank. 

You should stand up when a senior person enters the room.

Body language

If you get a boardroom table full of people nodding and smiling, this may just mean 
that they understand what you are saying and so give no indication of agreement. 

It is considered impolite to make eye contact, so it is usually better to look down. 

If you shake hands, do so quickly and lightly.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011

Business cards

You should make sure you exchange business cards at the very start of the meeting

Include a translation of your job title etc on the reverse side of your business card.

Many people include gold embossing on some part of the card, as it represents 
wealth, status and prestige. 

You should always hand your business card to the recipient so that the writing is the 
right way up for them to read, i.e. facing away from you. 

Business cards should be held in both hands when you are handing them to someone. 

You should examine the card carefully when you are given it. Putting a business card 
straight into your pocket is considered a lack of respect. 

Keep people’s business cards on the table throughout the meeting

Gifts

Gifts are an important business tool. Only expressing your thanks orally is considered 
rude.

Avoid expensive gifts but always wrap them carefully or have them wrapped in the 
shop.

If you are visiting an organisation, take one gift to present to the whole group rather 
than individual presents. 

Presents are often refused two or three times before finally being accepted. 

Gifts are rarely opened in front of you.

Misc

Do not be surprised if many of the people there observe and take notes without other-
wise contributing. 

When possible, refuse with "I'll look into that," rather than "No." 

Proper business etiquette involves dressing in conservative, dark, simple attire. Bright 
colours and/or ornate designs are considered flashy and inappropriate.

It is normal to speak slowly and pause between your sentences when speaking during 
a business meeting. 

Brevity is generally seen as a negative thing. 

It is common to be involved in a series of meetings rather than one big one during 
which all the major issues are discussed. 

Meetings are about building relationships and exchanging information, so it is rare for 
a decision to be made. Rather, they will be made later in consensus-building discus-
sions involving all the relevant people 

Either side can bring the meeting to a close. 

All the pieces of advice are actually about one country. Can you guess what country it is?

How similar or different is the business culture in that country and your own country? How  
does it compare to other countries that you know or know about?

What other differences do you know about for each of the headings above?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011

What other cultural differences do you know of that are connected to business meetings? 

Choose one of the topics on the next page and talk about cultural differences and  
personal preferences for as long as you can.
or
Choose a country and describe business meetings there, using the list of ideas on the  
next page if you like. Your partner(s) will try to guess which country you are talking about,  
and then say if they agree with your description. 

Meetings cultural differences possible topics
- Agenda
- Brainstorming 
- Breaking the ice and making people feel comfortable 
- Clothing and appearance 
- Compromise
- Consensus
- Decision making
- Ending the meeting
- Food and drink
- Formality
- Greetings
- Hierarchy and status
- How fixed agreements are
- Humour
- Interrupting
- Introductions
- Leaving the meeting room and building
- Minutes
- Negotiations
- Number of participants
- People’s involvement
- PowerPoint
- Presentations
- Rejecting ideas and proposals
- Roles
- Showing your real feelings and opinions
- Silence
- Small talk
- Timing 
- Turn taking

-

Venue

Answer key

The country is China

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011