Business English- Negotiating Language Board Game

Level: Intermediate

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (129 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Negotiating language meeting criteria board game

get a shorter-

term contract

get time off for

the birth of a

child

move to a

branch/ office

overseas

work from home

(=

telecommute)

START

attend an event

(e.g.  trade fair)

renegotiate

something

Instructions for students

Roleplay the situation written in the square which

you are on, starting from the very beginning of the

negotiation and continuing to the very end. The ones

in italics are negotiations within your company and

so can probably be more informal. Tell the team who

exactly you are negotiating with before you start

speaking. As well as face to face, you can

communicate by email, on the telephone, by

teleconference or video conference, or even by

phone message.

You will move by the number of points that your

partner gives you, one for each of the criteria below

which they think you meet. 

Criteria:

1

small talk (at the beginning and/ or end)

2

ending the small talk/ getting down to business

3

sticking to (= not changing) your position/ insist-

ing/ (polite) negative responses

4

changing your position/ softening your position/

changing your mind

5

making suggestions/ suggesting compromises/

suggesting solutions

6

trading/ linking offers and conditions

7

moving the meeting on/ quickly coming to agree-

ment/ not getting stuck on a point/ leaving de-

cisions to later

8

giving reasons

9

using polite language/ formal language/ softening

language

10 being positive/ using positive language (positive

adjectives etc)

11 asking about their position

12 summarizing/ ending the negotiation

13 mentioning future contact

14 the right level of formality/ friendliness

Try to use different language from previous people.

Only the person whose turn it is gets points.

get a car park-

ing space

reduce the

amount of the

order

change teams/

sections/ de-

partments

change the spe-

cifications that

you want

change the size

of the order

raise the price

that you are

charging

get a promotion

change your

performance

related pay

get better tech-

nology to do

your job with

get a pay rise

change your

personal targets

get some ex-

pensive training

change your

working hours

negotiate with

another team

change your job

responsibilities

(= duties = role)

negotiate with a

different

division

get cheaper

supplies

negotiate with a
different depart-

ment

go on fewer

business trips

negotiate with

an existing cus-

tomer/ client

get more tech-

nology to do

your job with

negotiate with a

supplier

take time off for

a vacation

negotiate with a

subcontractor

get a larger of-

fice

negotiate with a

prospective

customer/ client

get longer to

complete a pro-

ject

negotiate with a

co-worker

change

  the

branch/   office
that you work in

get more

people for your

team (= a larger

team)

get more

budget for your

project

get a longer-

term contract

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Brainstorm suitable language for the functions above with various levels of formality.

1

small talk (at the beginning and/ or end)

2

getting down to business

3

sticking to your position/ insisting/ (polite) negative responses

4

changing your position/ softening your position/ changing your mind

5

making suggestions/ suggesting compromises/ suggesting solutions

6

trading/ linking offers and conditions

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

7

moving the meeting on/ quickly coming to agreement/ not getting stuck on a 
point/ leaving decisions to later

8

giving reasons

9

using polite/ formal/ softening language

10 being positive/ using positive language (positive adjectives etc)

11 asking about their position

12 summarising

13 mentioning future contact

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Suggested answers
1. small talk (at the beginning and/ or end)

Did you have any problems finding us?

How was your flight?

Welcome to…

Is it your first time in…?

2. getting down to business

Can you kick things off by clarifying the situation for me?/ Let’s kick off by…

Do you want to get the ball rolling?

Well, it’s been nice to catch up but we should probably get started.

Shall we start by…?

3. sticking to your position/ insisting/ (polite) negative responses

Are you joking?/ You must be kidding./ That’s got to be (some kind of) a joke.

Can you cut the price of…?

Could you move a little more on that?

I am not very happy with…

I’ll have to back out (of this deal) unless…

If you put yourself in my shoes,…

That is (really) (rather) disappointing./ That’s a pity./ That’s a shame.

That is not on the table.

That seems a bit too low.

That’s a little high.

4. changing your position/ softening your position/ changing your mind

I can assure/ guarantee/ promise you that…

I can be flexible on that./ I’m willing to be flexible./ Thanks for being so flexible.

I can shake on that.

I’ll try to  meet you halfway./ Can you  meet us halfway  on…?/ We’d be willing to
meet you halfway on that.

I’m (fairly/ very) happy with that./ I’m (very) glad to hear that. 

Let’s try to find (some kind of/ some sort of) a middle way./ I think we can find a mid-
dle way

Let’s try to find a way round this.

That is (certainly/ probably) a step in the right direction.

That would be (absolutely) perfect/ wonderful/ great

Where do I sign?/ Where should I sign?

5. making suggestions/ suggesting compromises/ suggesting solutions

How would you feel about…?

I (would like to) propose

I think I can suggest a win-win solution.

To break the deadlock, might I suggest… 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Would you consider…?/ What would you think about…?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

6. trading/ linking offers and conditions

In exchange,…/ In return,…

We’d like to offer you…  if you/ as long as you…

7. moving the meeting on/ quickly coming to agreement/ not getting stuck on a 

point/ leaving decisions to later

Have we covered everything?/ I think we’ve covered everything. 

The second thing that we need to discuss is…

Shall we come back to that later?

Let’s not get stuck on that. 

8. giving reasons

The main reason for this is…/ This is mainly because…/ The first (of many) reasons 
for this is…/ There are many reasons for this, but number one is…

Our motivation is asking for that is…

9. using polite/ formal/ softening language
SEE OTHER SECTIONS

10. being positive/ using positive language (positive adjectives etc)
SEE OTHER SECTIONS

11. asking about their position

Does that suit you?

What’s your (main) aim?/ What is your (chief) goal?

What’s your opening position?

What’s the sticking point for you?

What did you have in mind?

12. summarising

To sum up what we’ve agreed/ discussed…

Just to check what we’ve agreed,…

13. mentioning future contact

Could we have that in writing by (close of business on) Friday?/ Can you email me
with…?/ I’ll email you the details by the end of the week. 

I’ll talk to my boss and contact you by…

You can expect to hear from us before…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Negotiating phrases mimes

Work together to think of mimes/ gestures/ body language which could represent each of 
the lines in italics above. The parts which are easiest to mime are marked in bold. 

Check your answers as a class.

Read out one of the phrases and see if your partner can do a suitable mime.

Do a mime and see if your partner can think of a suitable phrase.

Choose one of the functions above and see if your partner can come up with phrases, do -
ing the mimes at the same time if possible.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014