Business English- Negotiations Jigsaw Dialogues and Useful Phrases

Level: Advanced

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (109 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Business English- Negotiations Jigsaw Dialogues and Useful Phrases
Without looking below, sort the cards that you are given into ones which are near the 
beginning of a negotiation, ones which are near the end, and ones which are in the middle
(= the body of the negotiation).

Divide the conversations by formality and topic and then put each of the two conversations
into order. 

Check your answers with photocopies or with your teacher and ask about anything you 
don’t understand. 

Without looking at the cards, try to brainstorm the same or similar phrases into these 
categories below.
Starting negotiations

Requests/ Suggestions

Positive reactions (accepting, thanking, etc)

Negative reactions (rejecting, insisting, etc)

----------------------------------------------------

Hint 1: One negotiation is successful but the other finishes with no agreement.
Hint 2: One pair know each other and the other pair don’t know each other. 
Hint 3: The first person to speak in each conversation is written in italics. 
Hint 4: There are 21 cards in each negotiation. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Business English- Negotiations Jigsaw Dialogues and Useful Phrases

Try to join up the sentence halves below to make phrases with those functions from the 
two conversations.

Starting negotiations
1

Well, it’s been nice to catch up but we should 

quotation?

2

According to our 

reason why we invited you here today is to discuss..

3

The 

discussion,….

4

Did you get my email with our 

get started.

Requests/ Suggestions
5

Could you 

possible for you to…?

6

Would it be 

accept...?

7

How 

option is to…

8

Could you move 

more on that?

9

Another 

about…?

Positive reactions (accepting, thanking, etc)
10 I’d be 

more productive.

11 I 

understand your position on this.

12 I 

willing to consider that.

13 Hopefully our next meeting will be 

appreciate that.

14 Well, that was 

a ballpark figure.

15 Let’s try to find 

a middle way.

Negative reactions (rejecting, insisting, etc)
16 That wouldn’t go down 

flexible.

17 That doesn’t 

better.

18 Well, I’m afraid I don’t 

too low.

19 We would find it 

difficult to agree to…

20 So, we seem to have come to 

a stalemate.

21 That seems 

know what to suggest.

22 Unfortunately, we would find that 

difficult to agree to.

23 I was still hoping for something 

sound acceptable.

24 Well, I think we’ve already been 

well at head office.

All the phrases above can take extra words in the middle, mostly to make them softer/ 
more polite. Try to think of your own ideas for what could go there. Sometimes the same 
words can go in more than one place. If nothing seems to fit, it might be that you didn’t 
match them correctly in the last stage. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Business English- Negotiations Jigsaw Dialogues and Useful Phrases
Add the words below to the middle of the phrases above. 
Starting
initial
main
previous
probably

Requests/ Suggestions
a little
at all
possible
possibly
would you feel

Positive reactions (accepting, thanking, etc)
a bit
only
really
some kind of
totally
very

Negative reactions (rejecting, insisting, etc)
a bit
extremely
fairly
quite a lot
rather
really
really
some kind of
very

Check your answers with the cards. Other matches might be possible, so please check 
any other ones you have made with your teacher. 

Negotiate the same situations in pairs, then do the same for other internal and external 
negotiations. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Business English- Negotiations Jigsaw Dialogues and Useful Phrases

Cards to cut up/ Suggested answers

Casual – internal – with a colleague who you have met before – unsuccessful

Hi John.

Hi Steve. Long time no see.

Yes, it’s been ages, hasn’t it? Good summer holiday?

Not bad. Went to Hawaii again. How about you?

Me too! Must go somewhere different for once next year!

I’ve been thinking the same thing. Maybe Florida.

Sounds like a good choice. I heard that it’s a nice place. Well, it’s been nice to catch up

but we should probably get started.

Good idea. Can you kick off by clarifying the situation for me?

Sure. Basically, the problem is that my department is having huge problems with our new

computer system, so we really really need some more training.

Really? According to our previous discussion, the main priority for training was language

skills.

Yeah, that was true, but due to unforeseen circumstances we’ve had to recruit more staff

and they don’t have as the technical knowledge of our older staff.

I’m afraid changing the staff development plan in the middle of the year like that wouldn’t

go down very well at head office.

I totally understand your position on this. Can’t you ask the language training provider for

an intensive course to leave time and money for IT training?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

I think they’d find that extremely difficult to agree to. You’ll just have to ask your staff to

teach themselves in their free time.

That doesn’t really sound acceptable. I think a lot of them will just quit.

Well, I’m afraid I don’t really know what to suggest. As I said, we would find it extremely

difficult to agree to changing the language training. 

So, we seem to have come to some kind of a stalemate. Can I suggest that we go away

and think about it, then meet again next week?

Okay, let’s do that. It was good to see you again anyway.

It was great to see you too. Hopefully our next meeting will be a bit more productive.

I hope so too! See you next week.

Okay. See you then.

Formal – external – someone outside your company you’ve never met – Successful 

Good morning. My name is Hanson Smith. I’m Head of Purchasing here. You must be

Herr Schmidt.

That’s right, but please just call me Marcus.

It’s a pleasure to meet you, Marcus.

Pleased to meet you too.

How was your flight from Germany?

It was okay. I saw a couple of movies and got some work done, but there was lots of

turbulence so I couldn’t sleep so well.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

I’m sorry to hear that. Well, we’ve got a lot to get through, so this might be a good time to

look at the agenda, if you don’t mind.

Of course. No problem. Let’s do that.

The main reason why we invited you here today is to discuss the price.

Yes, I was aware of that. Did you get my email with our initial quotation?

Yes, we have considered your proposal of $540 a ton, but I’m afraid it doesn’t seem to be

a very competitive offer to us. Could you possibly accept $460?

That seems a bit too low. Unfortunately, we would find that price rather difficult to agree to.

Well, that was only a ballpark figure. Let’s try to find some kind of a middle way. How

would you feel about $500?

I was still hoping for something quite a lot better. Could you move a little more on that?

Well, I think we’ve already been fairly flexible on the price. Another possible option is to

agree on $500, but just for a small sample order.

I’d be very willing to consider that. Shall we perhaps say just three tons to start with?

That’s a deal! In that case, would it be at all possible for you to deliver by the beginning of

next month?

That won’t be a problem. In fact, we can have it to you by the end of this month.

Thank you. I really appreciate that. Well, I think we’ve more or less covered everything.

I think we have. It was a pleasure doing business with you. I’ll send you an email

confirming everything by the end of business today.

Thank you very much. It was a pleasure for me too. I look forward to hearing from you.

Goodbye.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014