Business English Presentations- Negotiation Game

Level: Intermediate

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: General

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (126 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Business English- Preparing a presentation negotiating game and discussion 

Instructions

You and your partner need to give a presentation together the week after next. Half the 
jobs that need to be done to prepare for the presentation are written below with the time 
that it will take to do each one. Without telling your partner the exact time needed, 
persuade them to do some of the jobs below and accept doing some of their jobs in return.
When you finish your negotiation, the time of the jobs that are still left on your sheet plus 
the time of the jobs you have volunteered to do from your partner’s sheet is your total time.
If you have agreed to do something together or split it fifty-fifty you should add the times 
with that in mind. The person with the least total time when the teacher stops the 
game is the winner
. Anything which you haven’t had time to discuss stays on your list. 

Stop your negotiation when your teacher tells you to and add up all the time of all the jobs 
that your partner has agreed to do (including half of the jobs that you have agreed to do 
together). Add the times from both of your worksheets and see who has less work to do (=
under 765 minutes) and is therefore the winner. 

Look at your partner’s worksheet too. Which things on the lists do you really think you will 
have to do to get ready for the next time that you give a presentation, e.g. at the end of 
this course? What order is it best to do those things in?

Put the stages that you are given into a logical order.

Check your answers as a class or with the answer key. Do you agree that you need to do 
all those things?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Preparing a presentation negotiating game and discussion Student A

Try to persuade your partner to accept as many of the jobs below as you can while only 
accept short/ easy jobs from them. Anything that you can’t persuade them to do stays as 
you job. The person who has less than 625 minutes of jobs in total when your teacher 
stops the game is the winner.

Student A’s list of jobs to do

1

Brainstorm possible topics as a mind map on a blank piece of A3 paper and choose
the best option, thinking about your audience and how long you have to speak. – 20 
minutes

2

Brainstorm absolutely everything that you could possibly mention about your topic 
onto a mind map in pencil on an A3 piece of paper, not editing out bad ideas at this 
stage. – 15 minutes

3

Organise the mind map into larger categories, brainstorming more examples if you 
can. – 20 minutes

4

Circle the best things on your mind map, meaning things which match your aim, 
won’t be known by the audience and will be interesting. Add even better options and 
more details if you can. Make sure you have between two and four sections left on 
your mind map, with between two and four things that you can speak about in each of 
those sections. If not, widen or narrow down the topic (= make it more general or more
specific). – 10 minutes

5

Put the main sections of your body into a logical order, writing (1) etc on your mind 
map. – 5 minutes

6

Add details/ support to each thing that is left on your mind map after editing it down 
(examples, stats, quotes, consequences, references, logical arguments, anecdotes, 
etc). – 120 minutes

7

Research more support for what you want to say, adding it to your mind map. Change 
the mind map if you find more interesting or more relevant information while you are 
researching.  – 240 minutes

8

Decide how you will hook the audience (= get and keep their interest), e.g. survey 
question, rhetorical question, amazing number or fact, quotation, personal story, im-
pactful image, how topical the subject is, or importance of the topic. – 15 minutes 

9

Decide what personal information you will give, making sure that what you say about
yourself/ yourselves is interesting, linked to the topic, and not already known by the 
audience. – 5 minutes

10 Check the pronunciation of difficult words, writing down phonemic symbols and 

words with the same sounds to help you remember. – 20 minutes

11 Time yourself giving the presentation, improving the content of the presentation and 

practising again until it’s exactly the right length.– 120 minutes

12 Edit down the PowerPoint as much as possible, cutting out pages, words, bullet 

points, figures, etc. – 25 minutes

13 Ask someone to proofread your notes and PowerPoint. – 10 minutes

Total time for the jobs above: 625 minutes (= half the total)

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Preparing a presentation negotiating game and discussion Student B

Try to persuade your partner to accept as many of the jobs below as you can while only 
accept short/ easy jobs from them. Anything that you can’t persuade them to do stays as 
you job. The person who has less than 625 minutes of jobs in total when your teacher 
stops the game is the winner.

Student B’s list of jobs to do
14 Write down a description of your audience at the top of the page where you are 

brainstorming, including what they will already know about the topic and will probably 
be interested to learn about it. Find out if you aren’t sure. – 30 minutes

15 Write down at least one realistic and concrete aim for your presentation at the top of 

your mind map, e.g. “After my presentation (I want to most of the audience to)…” – 25 
minutes

16 Edit your mind map down, crossing off things which the audience (probably) already 

know or won’t be interested in, or which don’t match your aim. Add any better ideas 
that you come up with while you are editing. – 30 minutes

17 Ask other people for feedback on your ideas. – 25 minutes
18 Re-write the mind map as notes (meaning not a script with full sentences) to make 

the body of your presentation. – 40 minutes

19 Simplify the language and ideas or add extra explanation so that everyone in the au-

dience will understand everything that you say. – 40 minutes

20 Write a possible Q&A stage with questions that people might ask and your an-

swers, including useful phrases for dealing with questions like “Yes, please go ahead.” 
Do more research if you don’t know the answers, and move very important info into 
the body of your presentation. – 180 minutes 

21 Write the summary/ conclusion (probably as a script with full sentences). – 10 min-

utes

22 Write the intro (probably as a script), including getting people’s attention, connecting 

personally with the audience, greeting, personal info, topic, hook, aim, organisation, 
policy on questions, and moving onto the main body. – 50 minutes

23 Use a highlighter pen on your notes so that you can easily see important the most 

important information when answering questions etc. – 20 minutes

24 Write the PowerPoint (in note form, without full sentences). – 70 minutes
25 Spellcheck your notes/ script and PowerPoint.– 5 minutes
26 Mark important pauses and stressed words on your notes, especially the introduc-

tion script and ending script. – 30 minutes

27 Think about some suitable body language/ gestures and rehearse your presentation

with that use of your body in front of a full-length mirror. – 40 minutes

28 Rehearse in front of colleagues/ classmates, if possible in the same room that you 

will give the presentation in. – 30 minutes

Total time for the jobs above: 625 minutes (= half the total)

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Preparing a presentation stages – Cards to cut up/ Suggested answers

1

Brainstorm possible topics as a mind map on a blank piece of A3 paper and

choose the best, thinking about your audience and how long you have to speak.

2

Brainstorm absolutely everything that you could mention about your topic onto a

mind map in pencil on an A3 piece of paper, not editing out bad ideas at this stage. 

3

Organise into larger categories, brainstorming more examples if you can.

4

Write down a description of your audience at the top of the page where you are

brainstorming, including what they will already know about the topic and will probably

be interested to learn about it. Find out if you aren’t sure.

5

Write down at least one realistic and concrete aim for your presentation at the top of

your mind map, e.g. “After my presentation (I want to most of the audience to)…”

6

Edit your mind map down, crossing off categories and examples which the audience

(probably) already know or won’t be interested in, or which don’t match your aim. Add

any better ideas that you come up with while you are editing.

7

Circle the best things on your mind map, meaning things which match your aim,

won’t be known by the audience and will be interesting. Add even better options and

more details if you can. Make sure you have between two and four sections left on

your mind map, with between two and four things that you can speak about in each of

those sections. If not, widen or narrow down the topic (= make it more general or

more specific). 

8

Put the main sections of your body into a logical order, writing (1), (2), etc on your

mind map.

9

Add details/ support to each thing that is left on your mind map after editing it down

(examples, stats, quotes, consequences, logical arguments, anecdotes, etc).

10

Research more support for what you want to say, adding to your mind map. Change

the mind map if you find more interesting or relevant information 

.

11

Ask other people for feedback on your ideas.

12

Re-write the mind map as notes (meaning not a script with full sentences) to make

the body of your presentation. 

13

Write a possible Q&A stage with questions that people might ask and your

answers, including useful phrases for dealing with questions like “Yes, please go

ahead.” Do more research if you don’t know the answers, and move very important

info into the body of your presentation.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

14

Write the summary/ conclusion (probably as a script with full sentences).

15

Decide how you will hook the audience (= get and keep their interest), e.g. survey

question, rhetorical question, amazing number or fact, quotation, personal story,

impactful image, how topical the subject is, or importance of the topic

16

Decide what personal information you will give, making sure that what you say

about yourself/ yourselves is interesting, linked to the topic, and not already known by

the audience.

17

Write the intro (probably as a script), including getting people’s attention, connecting

personally with the audience, greeting, personal info, topic, hook, aim, organisation,

policy on questions, and moving onto the main body.

18

Simplify the language and ideas or add extra explanation so that everyone in the

audience will understand everything that you say.

19

Write the PowerPoint (in note form, without full sentences).

20

Edit down the PowerPoint as much as possible, cutting out pages, words, bullet

points, figures, etc.

21

Spellcheck your notes/ script and PowerPoint.

22

Ask someone to proofread your notes and PowerPoint.

23

Check the pronunciation of difficult words, writing down phonemic symbols and

words with the same sounds to help you remember.

24

Mark important pauses and stressed words on your notes, especially the

introduction script and ending script.

25

Use a highlighter pen on your notes so that you can easily see important the most

important information when answering questions etc.

26

Time yourself giving the presentation, improving the content of the presentation and

practising again until it’s exactly the right length.

27

Think about some suitable body language/ gestures and rehearse your

presentation with that use of your body in front of a full-length mirror.

28

Rehearse in front of colleagues/ classmates, if possible in the same room that you

will give the presentation in.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015