Business English- Tips and Useful Phrases for Starting Presentations

Level: Advanced

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (125 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Business English- Tips and Useful Phrases for Starting Presentations

Cross off bad tips on presentation introductions from the list below. Leave any others as 
they are, including ones which depend on the situation or could be argued to be okay 
(there is no need to decide which are best or tick any). 

The best start for your presentations is probably “Can I have your attention, please?”

Greet the audience with “Good afternoon ladies and gentlemen. Thank you for coming 

to my presentation” or “It’s an honour to be able to present for you today”.

“How are you?” is a good way of making a personal connection to an audience (like 

saying the same thing in a one-to-one face-to-face meeting).

Mentioning something specific to that moment is a good way of making a personal con-

nection to the audience (time of day, something that happened just before, something 

happening after, etc). 

Showing that you have noticed the audience (number of people, specific people, things

that they are holding, positions, etc) is a good way of making a personal connection to 

them.

Mentioning how the audience probably feel (mood, temperature, thoughts, feelings, 

etc) is a good way of making a personal connection to them.

Apologise in advance for your presentation.

Always give your name and organisation which you belong to.

Only include personal information which is relevant to your presentation topic.

Think about what your audience already knows and will be interested in when deciding 

what personal information to include.

A good “hook” is one which interests the audience in the topic they are going to hear 

such as a connection to a recent news story, a connection to their lives or an intriguing 

question which will be answered during the presentation.

A good hook is one which wakes the audience up, e.g. making them laugh or shocking 

them, such as a witty or surprising quotation, a joke, amazing fact or interesting stat-

istic.

Surveying the audience can be a good hook, as long as people are interested in what 

other people’s answers are. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

If you use questions in your introduction, make sure it is obvious that they are survey 

questions (response obviously needed, usually hands up) or that they are rhetorical 

questions (grammatically a question, but no answer is needed, and an answer would 

perhaps be a bit strange, like the question “Why don’t you be careful?” in normal life).

State your aim (= what you want to achieve by presenting that information to that audi-

ence).

Stating your aim means the same as saying what information will be in your presenta-

tion. 

Explain how the body of your presentation is organised (e.g. into three sections, with 

the topic of each).

Explain your policy on the audience asking questions (at any time and/ or at the end). 

Move from the introduction to the body by silently bringing up the first slide and then 

start to talk about it. 

It’s okay to write out the introduction and summary/ conclusion as a full script (as long 

as the body is only written in note form) and you highlight important words in the script 

part. 

Hint: There are seven which are probably not good ideas. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Starting presentations tips and useful phrases
Suggested answers
Ones which aren’t recommended are in bold below. Note that some depend on the situ-
ation of your presentation. 

The best start for your presentations is probably “Can I have your attention, 

please?”

Greet the audience with “Good afternoon ladies and gentlemen. Thank you for 

coming to my presentation” or “It’s an honour to be able to present for you 

today”.

“How are you?” is a good way of making a personal connection to an audience 

(like saying the same thing in a one-to-one face-to-face meeting).

Mentioning something specific to that moment is a good way of making a personal con-

nection to the audience (time of day, something that happened just before, something 

happening after, etc). 

Showing that you have noticed the audience (number of people, specific people, things

that they are holding, positions, etc) is a good way of making a personal connection to 

them.

Mentioning how the audience probably feel (mood, temperature, thoughts, feelings, 

etc) is a good way of making a personal connection to them.

Apologise in advance for your presentation.

Always give your name and organisation which you belong to.

Only include personal information which is relevant to your presentation topic.

Think about what your audience already knows and will be interested in when deciding 

what personal information to include.

A good “hook” is one which interests the audience in the topic they are going to hear 

such as a connection to a recent news story, a connection to their lives or an intriguing 

question which will be answered during the presentation.

A good hook is one which wakes the audience up, e.g. making them laugh or shocking 

them, such as a witty or surprising quotation, a joke, amazing fact or interesting stat-

istic.

Surveying the audience can be a good hook, as long as people are interested in what 

other people’s answers are. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

If you use questions in your introduction, make sure it is obvious that they are survey 

questions (response obviously needed, usually hands up) or that they are rhetorical 

questions (grammatically a question, but no answer is needed, and an answer would 

perhaps be a bit strange, like the question “Why don’t you be careful?” in normal life).

State your aim (= what you want to achieve by presenting that information to that audi-

ence).

Stating your aim means the same as saying what information will be in your 

presentation. 

Explain how the body of your presentation is organised (e.g. into three sections, with 

the topic of each).

Explain your policy on the audience asking questions (at any time and/ or at the end). 

Move from the introduction to the body by silently bringing up the first slide and 

then start to talk about it. 

It’s okay to write out the introduction and summary/ conclusion as a full script (as long 

as the body is only written in note form) and you highlight important words in the script 

part. 

What things can you put into a presentation introduction? (= What functions should the 
different sentences in a presentation introduction have, greeting etc?) Look above to see 
what things are mentioned there, then compare the parts of an introduction below with 
what you just talked about. . 

Getting people’s attention/ Starting the introduction/ The first few words before you 
really get started

Greeting

Showing awareness of the audience/ Making a personal connection with the 
audience

Giving your name

Giving personal information

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Giving the title/ topic

Hooking the audience

Explaining your aim

Explaining the structure (= organisation) of the presentation

Explaining your policy on asking questions

Ending the introduction and moving onto the body of the presentation

Brainstorm at least three suitable phrases for doing each of these things, looking back at 
the tips on the previous page to help you if you like. 

Give similar advice and brainstorm similar phrases for ending presentations. 

Homework
Starting from a mind map brainstorming, write out the body of your presentation as notes 
(= just the information, with no full grammatical sentences or paragraphs). Then write an 
introduction for that presentation as a script (= everything that you will say as full 
sentences and paragraphs). Do not write the body as a script. Write your body (as note 
form) and introduction (in script form) on the same page, i.e. don’t write in the spaces 
above. You can also add a conclusion as a script if you had time to discuss that in the last 
stage above. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014