Comparative Adjectives- Discuss and Agree

A LESSON PLAN FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHERS

Level: Intermediate
Topic: General
Type: Lesson Plans
Submitted by:
Published: 14th Aug 2017

Below is a preview of the 'Comparative Adjectives- Discuss and Agree' lesson plan and is automatically generated from the PDF file. While it will look close to the original, there may be formatting differences. It's provided to allow you to view the content of the lesson plan before you download the file.

      Page: /

Lesson Plan Text

Suggested answers
one syllable + er
cleaner – dirtier 
more dangerous/ riskier – safer
more powerful – weaker
more frequent – rarer
more common – rarer/ more unusual

one syllable + double letter + er
more amusing/ funnier – sadder/ more tragic

more + one syllable
more boring – more fun/ more interesting
more bland – spicier

two syllables + er
more complex/ more complicated/ more difficult/ harder/ trickier – easier/ simpler
noisier – quieter 

more + two syllables
more cosmopolitan – more local
more energising/ more invigorating – more tiring
more fattening – more slimming
more fragile
 – more hard-wearing/ hardier/ sturdier  
more likely – more unlikely 
more pointless – more worthwhile
more relaxing – more stressful
more useful – more useless
more valuable – more worthless

more + three or more syllables
more accessible – more inaccessible
more comforting – more disturbing
more convenient – more inconvenient
more disappointing – more impressive
more efficient – more inefficient
more important – more trivial
more motivating – more demotivating
more overrated – more underrated
more popular – more unpopular
more reliable – more unreliable
more satisfying – more unsatisfying
more typical – more unusual

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

4

-y changes to -ier
more beautiful/ better looking/ more handsome/ prettier – uglier
more cheerful/ more life affirming – more depressing/ gloomier
more delicious/ tastier – more disgusting/ more revolting
drier – more humid
healthier – unhealthier
luckier – unluckier
more old-fashioned – more fashionable/ trendier

irregular
better – worse
better known
/ more famous – more obscure/ more unknown
better value/ more reasonable – worse value

Test each other on comparative forms above by saying the non-comparative form.

Test each other on the comparative opposites above (divided by a dash –)

Test each other on the comparatives with similar meaning above (divided by a slash /)

 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

5

Comparative Adjectives- Free Speaking
Choose topics like those above and compare those things, this time also using the 
adverbs in the box. Your partner will then agree, disagree or partially disagree (with 
phrases like
 “I agree that it is… er, but I’d only say that is… er” or “I also think it is more…, 
but I’d go further and say that it is… more…”)
Useful phrases for comparing precisely

… is

far/ much/ a lot

considerably/ substantially

quite a lot

slightly/ a bit

a tiny bit

…er

more…

than…

Suggested things to compare
food from two countries
two areas of this town or city
two athletes (= two sportsmen or sportswomen)
two books
two buildings
two cafés/ two café chains
two cars/ two car brands
two celebrities
two diets
two drinks
two electronic items (e.g. two different smartphone models)
two exercises/ two forms of exercise
two foods
two foreign languages
two future events
two historical places
two hobbies
two holiday activities
two holiday resorts
two hotels/ two hotel chains
two investments
two items of furniture
two jobs/ working for two different companies
two kinds of coffee
two kinds of holiday (= vacation)
two kinds of natural disaster
two kinds of training
two magazines
two movies (e.g. two comedies or two action movies)/ two kinds of movies
two news programmes
two newspapers
two nightspots
two periods in history

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

6

Terms of Use

Lesson plans & worksheets can be used by teachers without any fee in the classroom; however, please ensure you keep all copyright information and references to UsingEnglish.com in place.

You will need Adobe Reader to view these files.

Get Adobe Reader