Comparative Adjectives- Discuss and Agree

Level: Intermediate

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Comparatives & Superlatives

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (105 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Comparative Adjectives- Discuss and Agree
Using adjectives like those below, try to make statements that you both agree with. The 
adjectives must match both of the things that you are talking about (e.g. you can’t 
compare one clean thing and one dirty thing, it must be a dirty thing and a dirtier thing) 
and both things must be similar in some way (e.g. two cities, not a city and a car). 

Useful language for doing the activity
(Personally) I think…

                      In my opinion,…

What do you think?/ Do you agree?/ Don’t you think?

I think so too.
Really? I think…                   I would say that… is as… as…, but not… er/ but not more…
(I can see why you would say that, but) I would say that… isn’t as… as…

Ask about any words below which you don’t understand, making a sentence about each 
one for the other people to agree or disagree with. 

Comparative adjectives presentation
Look at the Without Comparatives Version of the worksheet. Together make comparatives
of just the ones in italics (not the other words) until you can work out what the ones in 
each section have in common.

Mixed rules
Match the rules below the fold to the sections on the worksheet.

---------------------------------------------------------------------fold-------------------------------------------

irregular
more + one syllable
more + three or more syllables
more + two syllables
one syllable + double letter + er
one syllable + er
two syllables + er
-y changes to -ier
Check as a class or with the answer key. When there is more than one possible form, 
which is more common?

Play the same game again, but this time using more complex comparing forms:

More complex comparing forms
much/ a lot… than…
quite a lot/ substantially/ considerably…  than…
a little/ slightly… than…
as… as…
not as… as…
not quite as… as…
not nearly as… as…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

1

Comparative forms version
cleaner – dirtier 
more dangerous/ riskier – safer
more powerful – weaker
more frequent – rarer
more common – rarer/ more unusual

more amusing/ funnier – sadder/ more tragic

more boring – more fun/ more interesting
more bland – spicier

more complex/ more complicated/ more difficult/ harder/ trickier – easier/ simpler
noisier – quieter 

more cosmopolitan – more local
more energising/ more invigorating – more tiring
more fattening – more slimming
more fragile
 – more hard-wearing/ hardier/ sturdier  
more likely – more unlikely 
more pointless – more worthwhile
more relaxing – more stressful
more useful – more useless
more valuable – more worthless

more comforting – more disturbing
more convenient – more inconvenient
more disappointing – more impressive
more efficient – more inefficient
more important – more trivial
more motivating – more demotivating
more overrated – more underrated
more popular – more unpopular
more reliable – more unreliable
more satisfying – more unsatisfying
more typical – more unusual

more beautiful/ better looking/ more handsome/ prettier – uglier
more cheerful/ more life affirming – more depressing/ gloomier
more delicious/ tastier/ yuckier – more disgusting/ more revolting/ yummier
healthier – unhealthier
luckier – unluckier
more old-fashioned – more fashionable/ trendier

better – worse
better known
/ more famous – more obscure/ more unknown
better value/ more reasonable – worse value

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

2

Without comparative forms version
clean – dirty 
dangerous/ risky – safe
powerful – weak
frequent – rare
common – rare/ unusual

amusing/ funny – sad/ tragic

boring –fun/ interesting
bland – spicy

complex/ complicated/ difficult/ hard/ tricky – easy/ simple
noisy – quiet 

cosmopolitan – local
energising/ invigorating – tiring
fattening –slimming
fragile
 – hard-wearing/ hardy/ sturdy  
likely – unlikely 
pointless – worthwhile
relaxing – stressful
useful – useless
valuable – worthless

comforting – disturbing
convenient – inconvenient
disappointing – impressive
efficient – inefficient
important – trivial
motivating – demotivating
overrated – underrated
popular – unpopular
reliable – unreliable
satisfying – unsatisfying
typical – unusual

beautiful/ good looking/ handsome/ pretty – ugly
cheerful/ life affirming – depressing/ gloomy
delicious/ tasty/ yummy – disgusting/ revolting/ yucky
healthy – unhealthy
lucky – unlucky
old-fashioned – fashionable/ trendy

good – bad
well known
/ famous – obscure/ unknown
good value/ reasonable – bad value

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

3

Suggested answers
one syllable + er
cleaner – dirtier 
more dangerous/ riskier – safer
more powerful – weaker
more frequent – rarer
more common – rarer/ more unusual

one syllable + double letter + er
more amusing/ funnier – sadder/ more tragic

more + one syllable
more boring – more fun/ more interesting
more bland – spicier

two syllables + er
more complex/ more complicated/ more difficult/ harder/ trickier – easier/ simpler
noisier – quieter 

more + two syllables
more cosmopolitan – more local
more energising/ more invigorating – more tiring
more fattening – more slimming
more fragile
 – more hard-wearing/ hardier/ sturdier  
more likely – more unlikely 
more pointless – more worthwhile
more relaxing – more stressful
more useful – more useless
more valuable – more worthless

more + three or more syllables
more accessible – more inaccessible
more comforting – more disturbing
more convenient – more inconvenient
more disappointing – more impressive
more efficient – more inefficient
more important – more trivial
more motivating – more demotivating
more overrated – more underrated
more popular – more unpopular
more reliable – more unreliable
more satisfying – more unsatisfying
more typical – more unusual

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

4

-y changes to -ier
more beautiful/ better looking/ more handsome/ prettier – uglier
more cheerful/ more life affirming – more depressing/ gloomier
more delicious/ tastier – more disgusting/ more revolting
drier – more humid
healthier – unhealthier
luckier – unluckier
more old-fashioned – more fashionable/ trendier

irregular
better – worse
better known
/ more famous – more obscure/ more unknown
better value/ more reasonable – worse value

Test each other on comparative forms above by saying the non-comparative form.

Test each other on the comparative opposites above (divided by a dash –)

Test each other on the comparatives with similar meaning above (divided by a slash /)

 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

5

Comparative Adjectives- Free Speaking
Choose topics like those above and compare those things, this time also using the 
adverbs in the box. Your partner will then agree, disagree or partially disagree (with 
phrases like
 “I agree that it is… er, but I’d only say that is… er” or “I also think it is more…, 
but I’d go further and say that it is… more…”)
Useful phrases for comparing precisely

… is

far/ much/ a lot

considerably/ substantially

quite a lot

slightly/ a bit

a tiny bit

…er

more…

than…

Suggested things to compare
food from two countries
two areas of this town or city
two athletes (= two sportsmen or sportswomen)
two books
two buildings
two cafés/ two café chains
two cars/ two car brands
two celebrities
two diets
two drinks
two electronic items (e.g. two different smartphone models)
two exercises/ two forms of exercise
two foods
two foreign languages
two future events
two historical places
two hobbies
two holiday activities
two holiday resorts
two hotels/ two hotel chains
two investments
two items of furniture
two jobs/ working for two different companies
two kinds of coffee
two kinds of holiday (= vacation)
two kinds of natural disaster
two kinds of training
two magazines
two movies (e.g. two comedies or two action movies)/ two kinds of movies
two news programmes
two newspapers
two nightspots
two periods in history

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

6

two pets
two places to take foreign guests
two podcasts
two political parties
two politicians
two pop groups/ two rock groups
two pop stars/ two singers
two problems/ two difficulties
two pubs/ two pub chains
two radio programmes/ two radio stations
two recipes/ two dishes that you could cook
two restaurants/ two restaurant chains
two risks
two rural places
two school subjects
two shops/ two kinds of shop
two sightseeing spots
two skills
two songs/ two versions of a song
two sports (e.g. two winter sports or two danger sports)
two streets
two television series
two towns/ cities
two trends/ two changes
two views
two ways of learning English
two ways of relaxing
two ways of travelling/ two means of transport
two wild animals

Adverbs with comparative adjectives presentation
Without looking above, brainstorm words which could go before “more…” or “…er”. 

Put the words on the next page into order from the biggest difference top to the smallest 
difference bottom. Some are (basically) the same as so should go next to each other.  
Then compare your answers with the list in order above. 

Mixed adverbs with comparative adjectives
a bit
a lot
a tiny bit
considerably
far
much
quite a lot
slightly
substantially

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

7