Countable and Uncountable- compare your days and weeks

Level: Beginner

Topic: Time

Grammar Topic: Nouns

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (94 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Countable and Uncountable- compare your days and weeks
Work in pairs or threes. Ask about and tell each other about your days/ weekends/ weeks 
and:
Find whose day, weekend or week was healthier. 
OR
Find things where your amount/ number is higher than your partner (e.g. “a lot of sugar” vs
“quite a lot of sugar”)
OR
Find things below which have been exactly the same for you and your partner today/ this 
weekend/ this week. 
Useful questions to ask each other
“I… How about you/ And you/ What about you?”
“How many…?”/ “How much…?”
Useful phrases to comment on what your partner says
“Me too”/ “That’s (more or less) the same for me”
“(Really?) I…”
“That sounds…”
“I think yours is more… than mine”/ “I think yours is …er than mine”

Suggested countable and uncountable things to talk about

alcohol

arguments

biscuits/ cookies

bread

butter

calories

cakes

cigarettes

coffee

deadlines

emails

excitement

(physical) exercise

fast food/ junk food

fatty food

fibre

free time

fried food

fruit

fruit juice

fun/ enjoyment

healthy food

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2016

meals

red meat (e.g. beef)

overtime

relaxation

sleep

soda (coca cola, etc)

stress

study

sugar

sweet food

tea

telephone calls

time with family

time with friends 

vegetables

vitamins

wine

work

Suggested amounts to talk about

a couple (of)

a few…s

a little

a lot (of)… (s)

a/ an/ one

about ten

almost no… (s)

bag(s)

bottle(s)

box(es)/ packet(s)

can(s)/ tin(s)

carton(s)

cup(s)/ mug(s)

glass(es)

jar(s)

(kilo)gram(s)

litre(s)/ pint(s)

loaf/ loaves (of…)

many…s

not any… (s)

not many…s

not much

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2016

one or two…s

quite a lot (of) (…s)

slice(s)

so many…s

so much

some… (s)

teaspoon(s)

very few…s

very little

As a whole class, ask about anything above you couldn’t understand or couldn’t use, 
working together to make a true statement and/ or question that you could ask each time. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2016

Countable uncountable grammar presentation
Without looking above, add “-s” to all the (countable) nouns below which can take a plural 
-s. Write a crossed off “
-s” next to the other (uncountable)) ones. If you aren’t sure, think 
about if they take “How many…?” or “How many…?” in questions or if they need 
“-s” or 
not with 
“some…”  
alcohol

argument

biscuit/ cookie

bread

butter

cigarette

deadline

excitement

(physical) exercise

fibre

free time

fruit

fruit juice

fun/ enjoyment

meal

red meat

beef 

overtime

relaxation

sleep

soda (coca cola, etc)

stress

sugar

tea

telephone call

time (with family/ with friends)

vegetable

wine

work

Check your answers with the previous worksheets. Countable nouns already have “-s” on 
those worksheets.

Put words which can go before countable and uncountable nouns like “many” into the two 
columns below. Some words can go with both. Write a noun with each one, with the 
correct use of 
“-s” or no “-s”.  

… + countable noun(s)

… + uncountable noun

How many potatoes?

How much cheese?

Hint: Five go with both countable and uncountable. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2016

Put these words into the two columns above:

a couple (of)

a few

a little

a lot (of)

a/ an/ one

about ten

almost no

many

not any

not many

not much

one or two

quite a lot (of)

so many

so much

some

very few

very little

Look at the use of “-s” or no “-s” on the second page to help with the task above. 

Check your answers as a class or on the next page.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2016

Suggested answers

… + countable noun(s)

… + uncountable noun

a couple (of)

a few

a lot (of)

a/ an/ one

about ten

almost no

many

not any

not many

one or two

quite a lot (of)

so many

some

very few

a little

a lot (of)

almost no

not any

not much

quite a lot (of)

so much

some

very little

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2016