Countable and Uncountable- Language Learning Discussion

Level: Intermediate

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Nouns

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Type: Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan Text

Countable and Uncountable- Language Learning Discussion
Ask for and give advice on language learning using the nouns below. If a word doesn’t 
have 
“-s” after it, that means “-s” would be incorrect. Using “a/ an” with a singular form of 
the words with 
“-s” is of course fine. 
vocabulary
words
phrases

grammar
tenses

body language
gestures

literature
poems

fiction
novels

non-fiction
biographies

press
magazines
newspapers

written communication
emails
texts/ SMS messages

spoken communication
phone calls
teleconferences/ videoconferences

cooking
recipes
labels on ingredients

research
research papers

information online
websites

jargon/ terminology
abbreviations (e.g. acronyms)

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

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software
(smartphone) apps/ applications

packaging
cereal boxes

food
menus

academic literature
academic papers
academic journals

punctuation
commas
apostrophes

equipment
DVD player instructions
laptop computer manuals

transport
air tickets
travel websites

homework
essays
grammar exercises

education./ training
exams/ tests
certificates/ qualifications

humour
jokes

Ask about anything above which you don’t understand or would like to hear other people’s 
advice about, sharing your experiences, problems and recommendations each time. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

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Without looking above for now, add “-s” to the words which can take it. The words are in 
the same sections as above, so each group has at least one word which can’t take 
“-s”
but they are mixed up. If you aren’t sure, try:
-

Putting some before the word and seeing if it sounds better with “-s” or no “-s”

-

Making a question about it and seeing if it sounds better with “How much…?” or “How
many…?”

-

Putting a number in front of it and seeing if it sounds right

phrase
vocabulary
word

grammar
tense

body language
gesture

literature
poem

fiction
novel

biography
non-fiction

magazine
newspaper
press

email
text/ SMS message
written communication

phone call
spoken communication
teleconference/ videoconference

cooking
label on ingredient
recipe

research
research paper

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

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information online
website

abbreviation (e.g. acronym)
jargon/ terminology

(smartphone) app/ application
software

cereal box
packaging

food
menu

academic journal
academic literature
academic paper

apostrophe
comma
punctuation

DVD player instruction
equipment
laptop computer manual

air ticket
transport
travel website

essay
grammar exercises
homework

certificate/ qualification
education./ training
exam/ test

humour
joke
Check your answers with the first worksheet. Can you find any rules/ patterns about which
kinds of words are uncountable?

When there is a general category and specific examples above, which one is usually 
uncountable? Can you think of any other pairs of general categories and specific 
examples which illustrate the same grammar (e.g. 
“baggage/ luggage” and “suitcase”)?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

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