Countable & Uncountable- Decide the Amount

Level: Intermediate

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Nouns

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (85 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Countable & Uncountable- Decide the Amount  Pairwork Speaking

Choose situations from below and in each case try to agree on what and how 
many/ how much.

- The first supermarket shop when you move into a house together
- Shopping for a dinner party for six people
- Shopping for a house warming party for between ten and fifty people (de-

pending on who turns up on the day)

- Shopping  for  a  birthday  party  for  a  five  year  old  girl  with  six  child  guests 

plus relatives

- What a year of perfect weather would be like
- Supplies for a new company setting up an office for the first time, starting 

with four employees

- Supplies for an established office of 12 people for one month
- Things your country should produce more of

-

Things your country should produce less/ fewer of

- Things you should eat and drink more of
- Things you should eat and drink less of
- What  needs  cleaning  up  and  tidying  up  in your hospital and the supplies 

you need to do so

-

What you need in order to do a spring clean of your three bedroom house

-

What to pack for two people taking one month to travel on an around-the-
world air ticket

- Things to buy at the same time as a new car (accessories, tools and sup-

plies)

- Things to take on your lifeboat from a sinking ship
- Things to save from your burning house

-

Things to take with you when trying to cross the desert to the nearest town 
after your plane crashes (the plane is still intact and reasonably well pre-
served)

-

Easily  available  things  that  you  need  in  order  to  produce  a  small  rocket 
that can reach the upper atmosphere in order to win a school prize

- Things to arrange for an American pop star who will be touring your coun-

try

- Things that should be recycled or recycled more

Talk about the other topics, but this time just agreeing on one countable noun 
and one uncountable noun plus amounts each time before moving on to the 
next one. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2012