Dealing with Problems and Complaints- Card Games

Level: Intermediate

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Functions & Text

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (106 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Dealing with problems and complaints responses card games

Instructions for teachers
Photocopy one copy of the worksheet per student to take away, plus one copy per group 
of two to four students to be cut up into playing cards. 

Cut up one pack of cards per group of students, with the bold ones on the left hand side 
divided from the ones of the right and the latter group of cards shuffled up. 

Give out just the left-hand cards (questions) first of all, and ask students to brainstorm 
possible responses in their groups. 

Then give out the other cards (responses) and ask them to match them up to the original 
question cards. If they get stuck, tell them that there should be three responses for each 
question. 

Give out un-cut-up copies for them to check their answers, and answer any questions they
have, e.g. if other matches are possible.  

To practise the language, play a selection of these games:

One student reads out a question, and the others try to make as many different re-
sponses as they can (not necessarily the ones in the pack)

One student reads a response and the other students try to make a question that 
could produce that response (not necessarily the one on the worksheet)

One student reads out a question, and their partner then chooses and reads out one of
the responses. They then continue the conversation for as long as they can. After a 
few minutes of that activity, they can do a more difficult version by hiding the re-
sponses and trying to have long conversations with just the questions as prompts. 

Students deal out the whole pack of cards and try to say as many of those things as 
they can while having a reasonably natural conversation. If they say something on one
of their cards, they can discard that card. The person who discards most cards is the 
winner. 

Cards to cut up/ Suggested answers

The room that I was

supposed to use for

my lecture today

was double booked

with another pro-

fessor.

I’m really sorry

about that. Is there

anything we can do

to make up for that?

Please accept our

apologies for any in-

convenience

caused. Did you find

a solution?

Oh, I do apologise.

If you can give me

all the details, I’ll

make sure that it

never happens

again.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

I’d like to make a

complaint against

my professor.

Oh, I see. Do you

mean an official

complaint?

I’m sorry to hear

that. Just a moment

and I’ll write all the

details down. What

is his or her name?

Oh, okay. Is this an

anonymous com-

plaint, or are you

happy for your

name to be used?

I’m not very happy

with the Pre-Inter-

mediate level Ger-

man course.

I’m sorry to hear

that. What’s wrong

with it exactly?

Oh, really? What

seems to be the

problem?

That’s a shame.

What aspect of it

aren’t you happy

with?

The problem is that

the class is much

too easy for me.

Hmm, that is a

problem. So, what

do you think might

be a best solution?

I see. In that case,

have you thought

about…?

I can see how that

might be a problem.

Do you mean that

you should be in a

higher level class?

I understand your

concern, but I’m not

sure exactly how we

can help you. 

Could I possibly

cancel the course

and take another

one next semester?

If possible, I’d like

you to pass my com-

plaints onto the pro-

fessor. 

That’s okay. There’s

no need to do any-
thing. I just wanted

you to know there’s

a problem. 

Given that situation,

can I have a re-

fund?

I’m afraid that is not

possible. However, I

can offer you…

Of course. If you can

give me your credit

card number, it

should take three or

four days. 

I’m sorry but I don’t

have the authority to

decide that. I’ll con-

tact…

Thanks for your

help.

Thanks for letting us

know. We’ll do our

best to make sure

this doesn’t happen

again.

Thanks for your un-

derstanding. Please

contact me again if

the same thing oc-

curs.

Thank YOU. And

once again, please

accept our sincerest

apologies for the

trouble caused.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Dealing with problems and complaints responses card games 
Brainstorming stage

Without looking above for now, brainstorm suitable phrases into each of the categories be-
low. Phrases which aren’t above are also fine as long as they fit into that category.

Complaining/ Explaining problems

Apologising/ Saying sorry

Sympathising/ Sounding sympathetic (so not actually apologising)

Asking for more information about the complaint

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Asking for action (politely)

Talking about solutions to that problem (including things that they can do them-
selves)

Promising to do something/ Talking about future actions

Negative responses (maybe with alternative ideas)

Thanking at the end of the conversation

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Dealing with problems and complaints responses card games 
Brainstorming stage suggested answers
Ones in italics below are not in the dialogues above but are also useful. Ones in italics 
with NOT and X are not correct or don’t have that function. Many more answers are pos-
sible, so please ask your teacher if you wrote something different above. 
Complaining/ Explaining problems
The problem is that…
I have a problem with…
I’m not (very) happy with…
… is (much) too…
… isn’t… enough.
I’d like to make a complaint about/ against…
I was supposed to…, but…
I’m not really satisfied with…
I expected…, but…

Apologising/ Saying sorry
I’m really sorry about that. 
Please accept our apologies for any inconvenience caused. 
Oh, I do apologise.
I’d like to apologise for…
(First of all), let me say how sorry I am for…
(Once again) please accept our (sincerest) apologies for the trouble caused.
(NOT I’m afraid… X)

Sympathising/ Sounding sympathetic (so not actually apologising)
I’m sorry to hear that. 
Oh, really?
That’s a shame./ That’s a pity. 
Hmm, that is a problem.
Right, I can see how that might be a problem.
I can understand that you wouldn’t be very happy with that. 
That sounds terrible/ horrible/ awful. 
(NOT I see X NOT I understand X)

Asking for more information about the complaint
What’s wrong with it exactly?
What seems to be the problem?
What aspect of it aren’t you happy with?
Do you mean…?
Just a moment and I’ll write all the details down. Wh…?
If you can give me all the details (…)
(I understand your concern, but) I’m not sure (exactly) how we can help you. 
So, if I understand you correctly, the problem is…
Would you mind giving me some more details?
How can I help you with that?
Is there any way we can help with that?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Asking for action (politely)
Could I possibly…?
If possible, I’d like you to…
(Given that situation), can I…?
According to the contract, I should be able to get…
I think I deserve…
In this kind of situation, it seems normal to me to…

Talking about solutions to that problem (including things that they can do them-
selves)
So, what do you think might be a best solution?
In that case, have you thought about…?
Is there anything we can do to make up for that?
Did you (manage to) find a solution?
If you…, it should take…
Did you try to…?
The best solution might be to…

Promising to do something/ Talking about future actions
I’ll make sure that it never happens again. 
We will do our best to make sure this doesn’t happen again.
I’ll investigate it fully and get back to you by the end of this week. 

Negative responses (maybe with alternative ideas)
I’m afraid that is not possible. (However, I can offer you…)
I’m sorry but (I don’t have the authority to decide that). (I’ll…)
Unfortunately it is too late to be able to do that (but you could…)

Thanking at the end of the conversation
Thanks for your (all) help.
Thank you for letting us know. 
Thanks for your patience. 
Thanks for your understanding. 
Thank YOU.
I really appreciate all your help. 
(NOT Thank you for your cooperation X) 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015