Defining and Non-Defining Relative Clauses- Bluff Game

Level: Intermediate

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Relative Pronouns

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (113 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Defining and non-defining relative clauses definitions bluff game
with useful language for Cambridge First Certificate Speaking, Writing and Use of English

Choose words and expressions from the list you are given and write a mix of true and 
false definitions from your own knowledge or imagination (you can’t use dictionaries). The 
false ones could be:
-

True definitions with something changed

-

True definitions with some false information added

-

Completely made up definitions (perhaps because you don’t know the expression)

You must write at least one true definition and at least one false definition. All definitions 
must have defining and/ or non-defining relative clauses
, e.g. using the structures 
below. 

Possible sentence structures
..., which means…, …
…, which…, means…
…, which…,…
…, whose…,…
(a)… which/ that/ whose…

Useful words and phrases
whose opposite/ noun/ verb/ adjective is…,
whose normal meaning is…, also means…
whose definition/ meaning is…
is a noun/ verb/ phrasal verb
is an adverb/ adjective/ idiom/ expression/ abbreviation
is a regular/ irregular…
is British English/ American English/ slang
is used to describe/ is used to talk about…
is a positive/ negative/ neutral/ mixed/ common/ rare/ spoken/ written word
is a synonym of…
stands for…
(literal/ word for word) translation
(literally/ approximately) translated
can be used in/ with…
collocates (strongly) with…/ goes together with…
follows…
is followed by…
similar to – different from
comes from French/ Latin/ Greek/ German

Read out or give your definitions to another team to see if they know or can guess which 
are true and which are made up.

When you finish, look at both vocabulary sheets and ask your teacher about any you don’t
know. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Defining and non-defining relative clauses definitions bluff game

Vocabulary to define 
(useful language for Cambridge First Certificate Speaking, Writing and Use of English)

Group A

1

CV

2

a break

3

a good command of…

4

a lift

5

a position

6

a relief

7

adaptable

8

adore

9

afford

10 ages
11 appearance
12 astonish
13 atmosphere
14 attract
15 be in no hurry to…
16 beat
17 blame
18 bland
19 brought up
20 bump into
21 can’t wait to
22 cheesy
23 classmate
24 clichéd 
25 cloying
26 coincidence
27 commuter town
28 concentrate
29 condo
30 costume drama
31 cram
32 day off
33 day out
34 days off
35 deliberately
36 determined
37 detest
38 distinctive
39 drawback
40 dread

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

41 dreadful
42 drop me a line
43 dull
44 décor
45 enclosed
46 expertise
47 fancy
48 feedback
49 flawless
50 fond of
51 force
52 furious
53 get on with
54 get used to
55 glance
56 go out with
57 gripping
58 had better
59 hardly
60 haunting
61 hearty
62 hilarious
63 ideal
64 if so
65 impeccable
66 in touch
67 interrupt
68 intriguing
69 keep fit
70 kick yourself
71 lip smacking
72 loads
73 loathe
74 location

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

115 sitcom
116 skip
117 snail mail
118 soap opera
119 souvenir
120spectacular
121stands out (from the crowd)…
122student halls
123studio flat
124suit
125sum up
126survey
127take after
128take up
129tedious
130the bee’s knees
131the other day
132thrilled
133timeless
134trailer
135trip
136turn out
137typical
138underrated
139unforgettable
140unmatched
141uplifting
142vacancy
143vast majority
144well
145whodunit
146wish

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Without looking above for now, try to remember or think of suitable words or phrases for 
each of the categories below. Some can go in more than one place. 

Positive words and expressions

Negative words and expressions

Job applications

Telling stories

Talking about likes and dislikes

Describing people

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Describing places you live

Phrasal verbs and other idioms

Informal expressions (such as those used in an informal email)

Vocabulary for describing movies

Vocabulary for describing food

Vocabulary for reports

Look back to check and expand your answers. Almost all of the expressions fit in at least 
one place above.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014