Different Meanings in British and American English- Jigsaw

Level: Intermediate

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Varieties and Dialects

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (97 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Different Meanings in British and American English- Jigsaw

Instructions for teachers
Copy one set of cards per group of two to four students. Decide which cards you want to 
use, for example by cutting off the cards which are too easy from the top and cutting off 
the cards which are too difficult from the bottom. 

Cut up the cards like a jigsaw, with a mix of different sizes and maybe shapes, with at 
least two cards in each piece of the jigsaw, and maybe with the whole middle column not 
cut up at all. Don’t leave any individual cards on their own. Students should match the 
word cards to the two meanings cards, using words above and below and the shapes of 
the cards to help when they aren’t sure about the meanings and about which one is British
and which one is American. Note that the words used in the explanations sometimes come
from the opposite kind of English, so they should just think about the meaning of the word 
in the middle column, not the origin of the words used to describe it. Many of the words 
(like “gas”) also have shared meanings that are not included due to lack of space, but 
which you could tell them if they get stuck. You could also:
-

Tell them a few matches

-

Tell them one column and get them to match the others

-

Let them look at an un-cut-up copy of the worksheet without touching the cards, then 
try again after hiding the answer sheet

After they check their answers with the answer sheet, they can test each other on the 
same words by:
-

Reading out two meanings for their partner to guess the word for

-

Read out a list of words and meanings from one side of the table until their partner is 
sure if it is British and American (maybe with points off if they are wrong)

-

Reading out a word and one meaning for their partner to say the other meaning of

-

Reading out a word for their partner to say both meanings for

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 1

Cards to cut up/ Suggested answers

British meaning of the

word

word

American meaning of the

word

just above ground level

first floor

at ground level

pedestrian underpass

subway

underground railway

natural gas

gas

gasoline/ petrol

wallet for coins/ women

purse

handbag

vacation

holiday

public holiday

underpants

pants

trousers/ slacks

French fries, as in fish

and…

chips

crisps, as in nacho…

place with a bathtub/

shower

bathroom

toilet

starter

entrée

main course

soccer

football

American football

a kind of private school

public school

a government-funded

school

top level academic

professor

university teaching staff

crazy

mad

angry

stove/ range

cooker

cook/ chef

the opposite of generous

mean

the opposite of kind

cookie, as in “chocolate…”

biscuit

a kind of savoury scone

field hockey

hockey

ice hockey

wheat, as in “fields of…”

corn

sweetcorn, as in “tuna and”

one pence

penny

a cent

track and field (sprint, etc)

athletics

sport

sprinter, etc

athlete

sportsman (generally)

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 2

cook under heat/ broil

grill

barbecue on a hot plate

long distance highway bus

coach

economy class

allowing free choice

liberal

left wing/ progressive

finish an undergrad course

graduate

successfully finish

education

technician

engineer

train driver

undershirt

vest

waistcoat

petrol station

garage

multi-storey car park

sweater/ pullover

jumper

knitted dress

alcoholic apple drink

cider

apple juice

dessert (generally)

pudding

crème caramel

eraser

rubber

condom

railway coach

carriage

baby carriage/ pram

pushchair/ stroller

buggy

baby carriage/ pram

zipper

zip

postcode/ nothing

nylons/ pantyhose

tights

leggings/ unitard

doctor’s office/ clinic

surgery

operating theatre

revenue/ gross sales

turnover

staff turnover

do the dishes

wash up

wash your hands

passage for cars

underpass

pedestrians way

drunk

pissed

annoyed

Jello (a kind of dessert)

jelly

a kind of jam

baby’s bed/ crib

cot

camp bed

top of a convertible car

hood

bonnet

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 3

to hold up stockings

suspenders

braces, to hold up trousers

cart/ wagon

trolley

streetcar/ tram

round brackets

brackets

square brackets

telephone box/ booth

callbox

roadside emergency phone

campground

campsite

pitch for a tent

freight car on a train

wagon

shopping cart/ trolley

sleeveless sweater

tank top

sleeveless T-shirt

bring into discussion

table a topic

lay aside/ delay

picnic basket

hamper

laundry/ linen basket

day care/ nursery

crèche

Xmas nativity scene

criticise

tick off

annoy

duplex (as in “… detached”)

semi

articulated lorry (“… trailer”)

a position in rugby

hooker

slang for prostitute

sidewalk (for walking on)

pavement

asphalt/ road surface

panto, a kind of Xmas play

pantomime

miming

detective constable

DC

District of Columbia

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 4