English Collocations- Counting Syllables Consonant Clusters Practice

Level: Intermediate

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Syllables

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (84 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

English Collocations- Counting Syllables Consonant Clusters Practice 

Put the words in one group below together to make common English collocations (mainly 
compound nouns) with two syllables, three syllables, four syllables and five syllables. 
There should be one of each, so label the collocations with their number of syllables to 
check, making sure you can actually pronounce them that way.

cloak

cleaning 

dry 

presenter

freelance 

room

TV

writer

classical 

glasses 

spring 

music 

sun

roll

windscreen 

wipers

orange 

five amps 

sixth 

place

the Czech 

republic

thirty 

squash

fifteen

bullying 

handbag 

hundredths 

straight 

line

workplace 

strap

blue 

chip company

filmed 

in 3D

plastic 

straw

track

suit

hair 

ankle 

Phillips 

label 

sticky 

screwdriver

strained 

spray

day

analysis 

horror 

film

needs 

links

URL 

trip

Go through the answers as a class, saying the collocations from the shortest to the 
longest in each section, making sure you pronounce them with the right number of 
syllables each time. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Answer key

2- cloak room
3- dry cleaning
4- freelance writer
5- TV presenter

2- spring roll
3- sunglasses
4- windscreen wipers
5- classical music

2- sixth place
3- orange squash
4- thirty five amps
5 – the Czech Republic

2- straight line
3- handbag strap
4- fifteen hundredths
5- workplace bullying

2- track suit
3- plastic straw
4- filmed in 3D 
5- blue chip company

2- hairspray
3- strained ankle
4- sticky label
5- Phillips screwdriver

2- daytrip
3- horror film
4- URL links
5- needs analysis

Find individual words above with consonant clusters (= two or more consonants together 
without a vowel between them, like “pl” or “ths”). Mark the number of syllables on those 
words and make sure you can pronounce them that way, without adding extra 
unnecessary syllables. 

Say collocations from above and see if your partner can count the number of syllables 
without looking above. Then do the same with individual words from above and your own 
ideas. Then tap out a number of syllables and see if your partner can make a word or 
expression that matches that number of syllables.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015