FCE (Cambridge First Certificate) Writing Part One Essays Advice and Useful Phrases

A LESSON PLAN FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHERS

Type: Lesson Plans
Submitted by:
Published: 20th Mar 2015

Below is a preview of the 'FCE (Cambridge First Certificate) Writing Part One Essays Advice and Useful Phrases' lesson plan and is automatically generated from the PDF file. While it will look close to the original, there may be formatting differences. It's provided to allow you to view the content of the lesson plan before you download the file.

      Page: /

Lesson Plan Text

FCE Writing Part One Essays Advice and Useful Phrases
Give your opinion on getting a good mark in this part of the exam, including topics like
those below and see if your partner agrees. Make sure you show the strength or weak -
ness of your opinions and support them with reasons, examples, personal experience,
things you have heard or read, etc. 
- Abbreviations (= short forms of words)
- Accuracy (= avoiding errors)
- Brainstorming (mind maps, lists, etc)
- British and American English
- Clever ideas
- Connecting your ideas
- Counting the number of words
- Doing Writing Part Two before Writing Part One
- Editing
- Formality/ Academic language
- Informal language (such as slang and modern online language used on Twitter and in

SMS messages)

- Introduction
- Language
- Looking at both sides
- Making notes
- Making sure you answer the question/ complete the task
- Making things up (using imaginary personal experience etc)
- Neatness (= Tidiness)
- Number of paragraphs
- Phrases that can be used in all Writing Part One essays
- Planning
- Quoting people
- Rephrasing
- Starting paragraphs
- Subtopics (the two that are given and the one that you should think of)
- Summary/ Conclusion
- Supporting your arguments
- Thinking of ideas
- Timing
- Title/ Headings
- Underlining
- Using ambitious/ high level language
- Using an eraser
- Using personal pronouns (“I” etc)
- Using statistics
- Using your personal experience
- Word limit
- Writing Part One v Writing Part Two
- Your own real opinions on the essay question

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Continue the discussion by giving your opinion using one of the phrases below. You can
also make negative statements. Does your partner agree with your ideas?

Starting/ Planning/ Essay structure
- Underline important words in the question to make sure you do exactly what you are

told to

- Do Writing Part Two first if you have a mental block with the Writing Part One essay,

coming back to the first task later

- Skip the Writing Part One essay and do two tasks from Writing Part Two instead
- Brainstorm ideas before you start writing 
- Make sure that you think of one more subtopic to include before you start writing
- Just write about the two subtopics given, not bothering with your own third subtopic
- Start writing as soon as you can think of one reasonably good third subtopic (rather

than wasting time brainstorming better options)

- Plan for one paragraph in the body for each of the two sides of the argument
- Plan for one paragraph in the body of the essay for each of the three subtopics
- Write about whichever opinion seems easier to support (even if it is not your real opin-

ion)

- Write about the subtopics in the same order as they are given on the question sheet
Introduction
- Rephrase the question in the introduction
- Give some background to the question by describing in the introduction how it is im-

portant, interesting and/ or topical

- Make sure that any description of the background to the question is true
- Give your own opinion in the introduction
- Only give your own opinion in the conclusion (not in the introduction)
- Explain the structure of your essay in the last sentence of the introduction (= the topic

of each paragraph in the body of your essay)

- Make sure that your introduction has at least two sentences
Content
- Show the strength or weakness of your opinions
- Use  different kinds of support (further explanation, reasons, logical  arguments, ex-

amples,   personal   experience,   other   people’s   experience,   things   you   have   read   or
heard, etc) for each of your arguments 

- Make sure that you look at both sides of the argument
- Look at both sides of all three subtopics
- Give academic references with author’s names and page numbers
- Make up statistics, quotations or page numbers of books to support your arguments
- Make up your own personal experiences to support your arguments
- Make sure that you stay on topic
- Make sure that all your ideas are good, clever ones
- Assume that the reader knows a lot about your country and city

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Compare your ideas with those below. 
Suggested answers
Starting/ Planning/ Essay structure
- Underline important words in the question to make sure you do exactly what you are

told to G

- Do Writing Part Two first if you have a mental block with the Writing Part One essay,

coming back to the first task later ?

- Skip the Writing Part One essay and do two tasks from Writing Part Two instead B
- Brainstorm ideas before you start writing ?/ B
- Make sure that you think of one more subtopic to include before you start writing G
- Just write about the two subtopics given, not bothering with your own third subtopic B
- Start writing as soon as you can think of one reasonably good third subtopic (rather

than wasting time brainstorming better options) G

- Plan for one paragraph in the body for each of the two sides of the argument ?
- Plan for one paragraph in the body of the essay for each of the three subtopics ?
- Write about whichever opinion seems easier to support (even if it is not your real opin-

ion) ?

- Write about the subtopics in the same order as they are given on the question sheet ?
Introduction
- Rephrase the question in the introduction G
Give some  background to the question  by describing in the introduction how it is im-

portant, interesting and/ or topical G

- Make sure that any description of the background to the question is true G
- Give your own opinion in the introduction ?
- Only give your own opinion in the conclusion (not in the introduction) ?
- Explain the structure of your essay in the last sentence of the introduction (= the topic

of each paragraph in the body of your essay) G

- Make sure that your introduction has at least two sentences G
Content
- Show the strength or weakness of your opinions G
Use  different kinds of support (further  explanation,  reasons,  logical  arguments, ex-

amples,   personal   experience,   other   people’s   experience,   things   you   have   read   or
heard, etc) 
for each of your arguments G

- Make sure that you look at both sides of the argument ?
- Look at both sides of all three subtopics B
- Give academic references with author’s names and page numbers B
- Make up statistics, quotations or page numbers of books to support your arguments B
- Make up your own personal experiences to support your arguments ?
- Make sure that you stay on topic G
- Make sure that all your ideas are good, clever ones B
- Assume that the reader knows a lot about your country and city B
Language
- Be ambitious with the language that you use (= try to use high level/ advanced lan-

guage) G

- Just use basic language to make sure that you don’t make mistakes B
- Use a neutral level of formality ?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Terms of Use

Lesson plans & worksheets can be used by teachers without any fee in the classroom; however, please ensure you keep all copyright information and references to UsingEnglish.com in place.

You will need Adobe Reader to view these files.

Get Adobe Reader