FCE (Cambridge First Certificate) Writing Part One Essays Advice and Useful Phrases

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (118 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

FCE Writing Part One Essays Advice and Useful Phrases
Give your opinion on getting a good mark in this part of the exam, including topics like
those below and see if your partner agrees. Make sure you show the strength or weak -
ness of your opinions and support them with reasons, examples, personal experience,
things you have heard or read, etc. 
- Abbreviations (= short forms of words)
- Accuracy (= avoiding errors)
- Brainstorming (mind maps, lists, etc)
- British and American English
- Clever ideas
- Connecting your ideas
- Counting the number of words
- Doing Writing Part Two before Writing Part One
- Editing
- Formality/ Academic language
- Informal language (such as slang and modern online language used on Twitter and in

SMS messages)

- Introduction
- Language
- Looking at both sides
- Making notes
- Making sure you answer the question/ complete the task
- Making things up (using imaginary personal experience etc)
- Neatness (= Tidiness)
- Number of paragraphs
- Phrases that can be used in all Writing Part One essays
- Planning
- Quoting people
- Rephrasing
- Starting paragraphs
- Subtopics (the two that are given and the one that you should think of)
- Summary/ Conclusion
- Supporting your arguments
- Thinking of ideas
- Timing
- Title/ Headings
- Underlining
- Using ambitious/ high level language
- Using an eraser
- Using personal pronouns (“I” etc)
- Using statistics
- Using your personal experience
- Word limit
- Writing Part One v Writing Part Two
- Your own real opinions on the essay question

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Continue the discussion by giving your opinion using one of the phrases below. You can
also make negative statements. Does your partner agree with your ideas?

Starting/ Planning/ Essay structure
- Underline important words in the question to make sure you do exactly what you are

told to

- Do Writing Part Two first if you have a mental block with the Writing Part One essay,

coming back to the first task later

- Skip the Writing Part One essay and do two tasks from Writing Part Two instead
- Brainstorm ideas before you start writing 
- Make sure that you think of one more subtopic to include before you start writing
- Just write about the two subtopics given, not bothering with your own third subtopic
- Start writing as soon as you can think of one reasonably good third subtopic (rather

than wasting time brainstorming better options)

- Plan for one paragraph in the body for each of the two sides of the argument
- Plan for one paragraph in the body of the essay for each of the three subtopics
- Write about whichever opinion seems easier to support (even if it is not your real opin-

ion)

- Write about the subtopics in the same order as they are given on the question sheet
Introduction
- Rephrase the question in the introduction
- Give some background to the question by describing in the introduction how it is im-

portant, interesting and/ or topical

- Make sure that any description of the background to the question is true
- Give your own opinion in the introduction
- Only give your own opinion in the conclusion (not in the introduction)
- Explain the structure of your essay in the last sentence of the introduction (= the topic

of each paragraph in the body of your essay)

- Make sure that your introduction has at least two sentences
Content
- Show the strength or weakness of your opinions
- Use  different kinds of support (further explanation, reasons, logical  arguments, ex-

amples,   personal   experience,   other   people’s   experience,   things   you   have   read   or
heard, etc) for each of your arguments 

- Make sure that you look at both sides of the argument
- Look at both sides of all three subtopics
- Give academic references with author’s names and page numbers
- Make up statistics, quotations or page numbers of books to support your arguments
- Make up your own personal experiences to support your arguments
- Make sure that you stay on topic
- Make sure that all your ideas are good, clever ones
- Assume that the reader knows a lot about your country and city

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Language
- Be ambitious with the language that you use (= try to use high level/ advanced lan-

guage)

- Just use basic language to make sure that you don’t make mistakes
- Use a neutral level of formality
- Use formal language
- Use some slightly more informal high-level language such as phrasal verbs
- Use very academic language used in published journal papers like using “The au-

thor…” to refer to yourself

- Use Latin abbreviations such as “e.g.” and “etc”
- Avoid personal words like “I” and “my”
- Use questions etc to make the essay more interesting for the reader
- Underline words to emphasize what you are saying
- Write words in capital letters to emphasize what you want to say
- Use exclamation marks
- Avoid repeating words and expressions in different parts of the essay
- Use paragraph headings
- Start paragraphs with multipurpose phrases like “Secondly” and “On the other hand”
- Memorise useful phrases for this part of the exam and use them in every essay you

write

Summary/ Conclusion
- Include a final paragraph with a summary and/ or conclusion
- Make sure that your summary/ conclusion has at least two sentences
- If your summary/ conclusion is only one sentence, add the consequences of your con-

clusion for the government, society, etc

- Use exactly the same words in your summary as in the body of your essay
- Include other arguments in your summary/ conclusion which you didn’t mention in the

body of your essay

Finishing/ Editing
- Leave editing Part One until you have written Part Two too
- Spend as much time as you need to make Writing Part One perfect, then use whatever

time is left on the Writing Part Two email, letter, review, article or report

- Make sure the essay is tidy enough to understand without needing to read anything

twice

- Make sure that your writing is perfectly neat
- Add higher level/ advanced/ ambitious language during the editing stage
- Cross things out and use little arrows to insert missing words (rather than erasing)
- Add whole missing sentences to the middle of the text by putting the sentence in a box

at the top or bottom of the page and drawing a long arrow to show where it should go

- Count every word that you have written to make sure you are within the word limit
- Spend a few minutes editing the essay down if you go over 190 words
- Leave five minutes for the final edit
- Leave one minute for the final edit
- Try to think of an interesting title

Write G for “good”, B for “bad” or ? for “It’s okay” or “It depends” next to each line above. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Compare your ideas with those below. 
Suggested answers
Starting/ Planning/ Essay structure
- Underline important words in the question to make sure you do exactly what you are

told to G

- Do Writing Part Two first if you have a mental block with the Writing Part One essay,

coming back to the first task later ?

- Skip the Writing Part One essay and do two tasks from Writing Part Two instead B
- Brainstorm ideas before you start writing ?/ B
- Make sure that you think of one more subtopic to include before you start writing G
- Just write about the two subtopics given, not bothering with your own third subtopic B
- Start writing as soon as you can think of one reasonably good third subtopic (rather

than wasting time brainstorming better options) G

- Plan for one paragraph in the body for each of the two sides of the argument ?
- Plan for one paragraph in the body of the essay for each of the three subtopics ?
- Write about whichever opinion seems easier to support (even if it is not your real opin-

ion) ?

- Write about the subtopics in the same order as they are given on the question sheet ?
Introduction
- Rephrase the question in the introduction G
Give some  background to the question  by describing in the introduction how it is im-

portant, interesting and/ or topical G

- Make sure that any description of the background to the question is true G
- Give your own opinion in the introduction ?
- Only give your own opinion in the conclusion (not in the introduction) ?
- Explain the structure of your essay in the last sentence of the introduction (= the topic

of each paragraph in the body of your essay) G

- Make sure that your introduction has at least two sentences G
Content
- Show the strength or weakness of your opinions G
Use  different kinds of support (further  explanation,  reasons,  logical  arguments, ex-

amples,   personal   experience,   other   people’s   experience,   things   you   have   read   or
heard, etc) 
for each of your arguments G

- Make sure that you look at both sides of the argument ?
- Look at both sides of all three subtopics B
- Give academic references with author’s names and page numbers B
- Make up statistics, quotations or page numbers of books to support your arguments B
- Make up your own personal experiences to support your arguments ?
- Make sure that you stay on topic G
- Make sure that all your ideas are good, clever ones B
- Assume that the reader knows a lot about your country and city B
Language
- Be ambitious with the language that you use (= try to use high level/ advanced lan-

guage) G

- Just use basic language to make sure that you don’t make mistakes B
- Use a neutral level of formality ?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

- Use formal language G
- Use some slightly more informal high-level language such as phrasal verbs G
- Use very academic language used in published journal papers like using “The au-

thor…” to refer to yourself B

- Use Latin abbreviations such as “e.g.” and “etc” ?
- Avoid personal words like “I” and “my” B
- Use questions etc to make the essay more interesting for the reader G
- Underline words to emphasize what you are saying B
- Write words in capital letters to emphasize what you want to say B
- Use exclamation marks B
- Avoid repeating words and expressions in different parts of the essay G
- Use paragraph headings B
- Start paragraphs with multipurpose phrases like “Secondly” and “On the other hand” B
- Memorise useful phrases for this part of the exam and use them in every essay you

write B

Summary/ Conclusion
Include a final paragraph with a summary and/ or conclusion G
- Make sure that your summary/ conclusion has at least two sentences G
If your summary/ conclusion is only one sentence, add the consequences of your con-

clusion for the government, society, etc G

- Use exactly the same words in your summary as in the body of your essay B
- Include other arguments in your summary/ conclusion which you didn’t mention in the

body of your essay B

Finishing/ Editing
- Leave editing Part One until you have written Part Two too B
- Spend as much time as you need to make Writing Part One perfect, then use whatever

time is left on the Writing Part Two email, letter, review, article or report B

- Make sure the essay is tidy enough to understand without needing to read anything

twice G

- Make sure that your writing is perfectly neat B
- Add higher level/ advanced/ ambitious language during the editing stage G
- Cross things out and use little arrows to insert missing words (rather than erasing) G
- Add whole missing sentences to the middle of the text by putting the sentence in a box

at the top or bottom of the page and drawing a long arrow to show where it should go ?

- Count every word that you have written to make sure you are within the word limit B
- Spend a few minutes editing the essay down if you go over 190 words B
- Leave five minutes for the final edit ?
- Leave one minute for the final edit B
- Try to think of an interesting title B

Brainstorm language to do the things in italics on the pages above. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015