Festivals and Celebrations- Modals of Obligation, Prohibition and Permission

Level: Intermediate

Topic: Time

Grammar Topic: Modals

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (92 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Festivals and Celebrations- Modals of Obligation, Prohibition and Permission

Christmas Rules 

Imagine you work in the same office. Discuss what the rules on Xmas in the office should 

be and try to agree policies together, using the ideas below to help. Your teacher will tell 

you if you should roleplay a whole meeting on the topic or just discuss it more freely. 

When you finish, compare your rules with another group and/ or the whole class.  

Suggested phrases for talking about rules

You need to = have to 

You can’t = mustn’t = aren’t allowed to

You can = are allowed to

You don’t have to = don’t need to = there is no need to = it isn’t necessary to

arrange a meeting on Xmas day

arrange a secret Santa

buy Xmas presents for all your colleagues

buy Xmas presents just for colleagues who you consider friends

decorate the lobby area/ office entrance

decorate the whole office

decorate your desk space

drink alcohol at the office Xmas party

drink alcohol at lunchtime on Xmas Eve

finish early on Xmas Eve

give  gifts to customers

have a Xmas party in the cafeteria

have a Xmas party in the office

invite your family to the office Xmas party

play Xmas music

play Xmas music in the lobby

play Xmas music in the office

send personal Xmas cards to colleagues/ clients/ business contacts

send religious Xmas cards (with nativity scenes, etc) to company contacts

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2016

send the company Xmas cards to your own friends and/ or family

send your expenses claim early in December

share photos of the office Xmas party online

take Boxing Day off

take Xmas day off

take Xmas Eve off

take a week off at Xmas

take another day off instead of Xmas day

take home extra, unneeded company Xmas cards

take part in the office secret Santa

take photos at the office Xmas party

take two weeks off at Xmas

use Xmas greetings when you answer the phone

use non-religious language (“Happy holidays”, “Season’s greetings”)

wear Xmas-themed clothes

work (from home) on Xmas day

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2016

Festivals and celebrations to discuss the rules for

Discuss similar rules for other special times such as those below

After a big business success

After a big product launch

After finishing a big project

An important birthday of a child (e.g. first birthday or eighteenth birthday)

April Fool’s Day

Armistice Day/ Remembrance Day/ War Memorial Day/ Poppy Day

Birthdays

Bonfire Night/ Guy Fawkes Night

Buddhist festivals

Carnival

Cherry blossom viewing

Chinese New Year/Lunar New Year

Diwali

Easter

Eid

First day at work

Gay Pride parades

Getting divorced

Getting engaged

Getting married

Good Friday

Halloween

Hanukkah

Having a baby

(American) Independence Day

Last day at work

Lent

May Day protests

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2016

National election days

National holidays/ Bank holidays

New Year’s Eve/ New Year’s Day

Oktoberfest

Ramadan

Retirement

Saint Patrick’s Day

Shrove Tuesday/ Pancake Day

Skiing season

Snowy days

Special birthdays (40

th 

etc)

Summer festivals

Tanabata

Valentine’s Day

Wedding anniversaries

When an important visitor comes to visit

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2016