IELTS Academic Writing Task Two- Tips and Useful Phrases

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (130 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

IELTS Academic Writing Task Two Tips and Useful Phrases
What advice would you give on writing IELTS Writing Part Two essays? Possible topics:
Before the exam

Analysing the question

Planning/ Paragraphing

Introduction

Writing

Summary/ Conclusion

Editing
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Cross off any of the tactics below which are bad ideas/ not true. 
Preparation for the test

It’s worth doing extra timed writing practice even if no one can correct it

The answers at the back of exam practice books are perfect models which you should 
copy as much as possible

Memorise model answers from the internet and just change a few words and sen-
tences to make your answer in the exam

Make a note of your typical errors in IELTS Writing and go back to them many times to 
check that you can remember the right versions

Analysing the question

Underline important words in the question

There’s no need to read and underline instructions like “Give reasons” because they 
are the same in every question

“To what extent do you agree or disagree?” questions are the same as “Look at both 
sides and then…” questions

With “To what extent do you agree or disagree?” questions you still have to look at 
both sides of the argument

With “To what extent do you agree or disagree?” questions you have to say how strong
or weak your opinion is

With a looking at both sides question like “What are the advantages and disadvan-
tages of…?”, one advantage and one disadvantage is enough

Planning/ Paragraphing

If you can think of a good paragraph structure right away, there is no need to brain-
storm

Brainstorm as many ideas as you can before deciding on your paragraph structure

Spend about 10 minutes planning

Most IELTS essays have four paragraphs (two main paragraphs plus an introduction 
and summary or conclusion)

If you are just looking at one side of the argument, you might want three main para-
graphs with one for each of the reasons for your opinion

If you are looking at two advantages and two disadvantages, you need four main para-
graphs (i.e. six paragraphs in total)

Introduction

Rephrase the question in your introduction

Spend a couple of minutes to make sure you don’t repeat any words from the question
when you are rephrasing it

If you can’t think of a word with the same meaning as one in the question when you 
are rephrasing, just change the grammar (e.g. changing from a verb to a noun)

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

If you can’t think of a word with the same meaning as one in the question when you 
are rephrasing, just use one with more or less the same meaning

End the introduction with a sentence that explains the structure of the essay

Give your own opinion in the introduction if you will only look at one side of the argu-
ment

Give your own opinion in the introduction if you will look at both sides of the argument

You can add some background to the question in the introduction such as how topical 
it is

Think carefully about whether the topic really is “controversial” or if “many people” re-
ally believe something before using phrases like that

Writing

Use different kinds of support (personal experience, consequences, other people’s ex-
periences, things you have read or heard, logical arguments, etc) for each argument 
you look at

Make up imaginary data to support your arguments

Make up quotes and the places they came from to support your arguments

Avoid personal pronouns like “I”, “me” and “my”

One or two sentences is enough support for each argument you give

Make sure that the paragraphs are similar lengths

Summary/ Conclusion

All IELTS Academic Writing Part Two essays should end with a summary and then 
your own opinion

One sentence is okay for a summary/ conclusion

If you’ve looked at both sides, you need to clearly show why one side is more or less 
important when you come to a conclusion

If what you have written leads to a conclusion that is the opposite of your own opinion, 
write the former rather than the latter

It’s okay to totally sit on the fence between two positions in your conclusion

Editing

Leave at least three or four minutes for a final edit

Count the exact number of words 

Count the number of words in two lines, calculate how many words per line, then count
how many lines

Make sure that the examiner can understand without having to read anything twice

Make sure that your essay is really neat (= tidy = not messy)

Use an eraser to get rid of all mistakes

It’s okay to correct by crossing things out, using triangular shapes to add extra words, 
etc

You can insert one or two extra sentences with an arrow to improve the structure or 
reach the minimum number of words

Add higher level language while you edit

Get rid of repetitions by rephrasing, using reference expressions, etc

Hint: 22 need to be crossed off. 

Compare your ideas with the suggested answers below.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Suggested answers

The bad advice is in bold

Preparation for the test

It’s worth doing extra timed writing practice even if no one can correct it

The answers at the back of exam practice books are perfect models which you 
should copy as much as possible

Memorise model answers from the internet and just change a few words and 
sentences to make your answer in the exam

Make a note of your typical errors in IELTS Writing and go back to them many times to 
check that you can remember the right versions

Analysing the question

Underline important words in the question

There’s no need to read and underline instructions like “Give reasons” because 
they are the same in every question

“To what extent do you agree or disagree?” questions are the same as “Look at 
both sides and then…” questions

With “To what extent do you agree or disagree?” questions you still have to look
at both sides of the argument

 With “To what extent do you agree or disagree?” questions you have to say how 

strong or weak your opinion is

With a looking at both sides question like “What are the advantages and disad-
vantages of…?”, one advantage and one disadvantage is enough

Planning/ Paragraphing

If you can think of a good paragraph structure right away, there is no need to brain-
storm

Brainstorm as many ideas as you can before deciding on your paragraph struc-
ture

Spend about 10 minutes planning

Most IELTS essays have four paragraphs (two main paragraphs plus an introduction 
and summary or conclusion)

If you are just looking at one side of the argument, you might want three main para-
graphs with one for each of the reasons for your opinion

If you are looking at two advantages and two disadvantages, you need four main
paragraphs (i.e. six paragraphs in total)

Introduction

Rephrase the question in your introduction

Spend a couple of minutes to make sure you don’t repeat any words from the 
question when you are rephrasing it

If you can’t think of a word with the same meaning as one in the question when you 
are rephrasing, just change the grammar (e.g. changing from a verb to a noun)

If you can’t think of a word with the same meaning as one in the question when 
you are rephrasing, just use one with more or less the same meaning

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

 End the introduction with a sentence that explains the structure of the essay
 Give your own opinion in the introduction if you will only look at one side of the argu-

ment

Give your own opinion in the introduction if you will look at both sides of the ar-
gument

 You can add some background to the question in the introduction such as how topical 

it is

Think carefully about whether the topic really is “controversial” or if “many people” re-
ally believe something before using phrases like that

Writing
 Use different kinds of support (personal experience, consequences, other people’s ex-

periences, things you have read or heard, logical arguments, etc) for each argument 
you look at

Make up imaginary data to support your arguments

Make up quotes and the places they came from to support your arguments

Avoid personal pronouns like “I”, “me” and “my”

One or two sentences is enough support for each argument you give

Make sure that the paragraphs are similar lengths

Summary/ Conclusion

All IELTS Academic Writing Part Two essays should end with a summary and 
then your own opinion

One sentence is okay for a summary/ conclusion

If you’ve looked at both sides, you need to clearly show why one side is more or less 
important when you come to a conclusion

If what you have written leads to a conclusion that is the opposite of your own opinion, 
write the former rather than the latter

It’s okay to totally sit on the fence between two positions in your conclusion

Editing

Leave at least three or four minutes for a final edit

Count the exact number of words 

Count the number of words in two lines, calculate how many words per line, then count
how many lines

Make sure that the examiner can understand without having to read anything twice

Make sure that your essay is really neat (= tidy = not messy)

Use an eraser to get rid of all mistakes

It’s okay to correct by crossing things out, using triangular shapes to add extra words, 
etc

You can insert one or two extra sentences with an arrow to improve the structure or 
reach the minimum number of words

Add higher level language while you edit

 Get rid of repetitions by rephrasing, using reference expressions, etc

Brainstorm useful phrases for doing the things in italics above. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015