IELTS Listening- Set Questions

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (125 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

IELTS Listening set each other questions
Group A

Work together to make IELTS Listening-style questions for the test recording(s) your 
teacher gives you. You will then test the other group with your questions and they will do 
the same to you with different listening texts. 
Rules:
1. You can use your dictionaries and ask your teacher to help you while you are creating 

the  questions  and  you  can  replay  sections  as  many  times  as  you  like,  but  you  can’t 
look at the tapescripts. 

2. Write ten questions per complete listening text
3. The questions must be in the same order as the text
4. You can’t use the same type of task more than once, meaning you must change task-

type after all breaks in the recording

5. Although the other group might be able to guess something about the answer before 

listening,  they  shouldn’t  have  more  than  a  10%  chance  of  getting  the  actual  answer 
just by guessing

6. You must use task types and tricks from the lists below. Please tick off the ones that 

you use.

Task types that your group can use:
1. Forms to fill in with no more than two words and/ or a number in the gap
2. Gapped sentences with no more than 3 words and/ or a number in the gap
3. Completing a summary of what is said with one word or number for each gap
4. Selecting three out of six things, e.g. topics talked about or opinions 
5. Short answer questions
6. Completing a flow chart

PTO for ways of tricking and helping the other group

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2012

Tricks you can use to make the questions more difficult (please use at least three 
and tick the ones you use):
Spelling and punctuation
1. Asking them to write words with consonant combinations whose spelling and pronunci-

ation are difficult to guess and remember, e.g. “photo” and “chorus”

2. Words with double letters, e.g. –ed forms and –er forms
3. Compound nouns which must be spelt as one word
4. Asking them to write numbers or words which are said with “double”
5. Asking them to write words which need capital letters
Grammar
6. Questions where the preposition must be correct to get a point
Spotting the correct information
7. Gapped  sentences  that  use  different  words  from  the  text  (even  though  the  word  or 

words in the gap are the same as the text)

8. Needing to spot that someone changes their mind
9. Varied amounts of time between the answers to the questions, e.g. two answers quite 

close together and then a long time before the next answer

Numbers
10. Asking them to write amounts of money
11. Asking them to write large numbers
Fitting in the gap
12. Answers which would be longer than the maximum number of words if they didn’t use 

note form (= cut out some of the grammatical words)

13. Questions in which they need to write the plural for their answer to be correct
Pronunciation
14. Questions where unstressed words must be written
Misc
15. Changing task during a single listening text

Ways you can help the other group:
Fitting in the gap
1. Gap-fill questions where several words that mean the same thing are all possible an-

swers (e.g. “one” and “a”)

2. Questions where the determiners (e.g. “these” and “any”) are optional in the answers
Spotting the right information
3. Questions about things which are said twice in the text (usually in different ways)
4. Questions where the other options can all be crossed off because of what people say
Anticipating the answer
5. Words which are spelt out but are almost possible to guess the spelling of 
Spelling
6. Questions in which both an abbreviation and full words (e.g. “etc” and “etcetera”) are 

okay in the answer

7. Capital letters which are obvious, e.g. days of the week and personal names
8. Spellings you can guess even if you’ve never heard them before

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2012

IELTS Listening set each other questions
Group B

Work together to make IELTS Listening-style questions for the test recording(s) your 
teacher gives you. You will then test the other group with your questions and they will do 
the same to you with different listening texts. 
Rules:
1. You can use your dictionaries and ask your teacher to help you while you are creating 

the  questions  and  you  can  replay  sections  as  many  times  as  you  like,  but  you  can’t 
look at the tapescripts. 

2. Write ten questions per complete listening text
3. The questions must be in the same order as the text
4. You can’t use the same type of task more than once, meaning you must change task-

type after all breaks in the recording

5. Although the other group might be able to guess something about the answer before 

listening,  they  shouldn’t  have  more  than  a  10%  chance  of  getting  the  actual  answer 
just by guessing

6. You must use task types and tricks from the lists below. Please tick off the ones that 

you use.

Task types that your group can use:
1. Tables to fill in with no more than two words and/ or a number in the gap
2. Gaps for one word only
3. Matching, e.g. matching the different people with what they say
4. Labelling a diagram
5. Multiple choice with three options for each question

PTO for ways of tricking and helping the other group

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2012

Tricks you can use to make the questions more difficult (please use at least three 
and tick the ones you use):
Spelling and punctuation
1. Asking them to write words which have silent letters
2. Compound nouns which must be spelt as two words with a gap
3. Compound nouns which must be spelt as two words with a hyphen
4. Asking them to write irregular plurals and/ or verbs
5. Asking  them  to  write  words  which  even  native  speakers  find  it  difficult  to  spell,  e.g. 

“definitely”

Grammar
6. Gaps which are grammatically different from the words in the listening text
Spotting the correct information
7. Needing to select the right answer from several things that are all mentioned
8. A long time before the answer to the first question
Numbers
9. Asking them to write times and/ or dates
10. Testing comprehension of numbers which are pronounced in more difficult ways in the 

text, e.g. “half a million”, “ten to two” and “nought point five”

Fitting in the gap
11. Answers which are antonyms (= words with the opposite meaning) of the words in the 

text

12. Gaps where it is difficult to choose the right length of answer
13. Questions  where  the  correct  determiner  (e.g.  “some”,  “three”,  “a”,  “the”)  must  be  in-

cluded

Pronunciation
14. Grammatical endings which are difficult to hear, e.g. “ed” when it sounds like “t” and “s” 

in “ts”

Misc
15. Both a number and a word or words needed in one gap

Ways you can help the other group:
Fitting in the gap
1. Questions where a singular or plural noun would both be okay
2. Grammatical endings which you can guess from the gap even if you don’t hear them, 

e.g. third person S in a verb after “he”

Spotting the right information
3. Questions about things which are easy to spot because the speaker announces what 

they are going to talk about, e.g. by introducing the next topic of their presentation

Anticipating the answer
4. Numbers which they can half guess from your real life knowledge, e.g. prices
Spelling
5. Answers  which  have  different  British  and American  spelling.  (Easier  because  British 

and American are both are okay in the exam.)

6. Questions in which both a symbol and a word (e.g. “$” and “dollars”) are okay in the 

answer

7. Collocations made of words which students are likely to be familiar with even if they’ve 

never heard that combination before

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2012

IELTS Listening Set each other questions
Worksheet 2 – Trying the other group’s tasks and discussion (for both groups)

Swap rooms or recordings and listen to the other texts once only. After you have finished 
you can check your answers with the tapescript.

Still in the same groups, try to guess what tricks the other group chose to make the 
questions more difficult for you and what things they chose to do to help you(their lists of 
tricks and help were different from yours).

Look at the list of tricks and help that the other group had and try to guess which ones 
they chose. 

Come together as a class and check which tricks and help the other group used when 
they were writing the questions you had to answer.

Discussion

What can you do to not fall into the traps set by the examiners? 

How can you make sure you take advantage of the help they give you?

Is there any language which is particularly useful to study for the Listening test? How 
can you learn that language?

How can you learn to understand different native speaker accents?

How can you learn to cope with the four different kinds of listening texts (conversation 
dealing  with  everyday arrangements,  monologue on everyday  practical matters, con-
versation about academic matters, and lecture)?

How can you prepare for the IELTS Listening test outside the classroom?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2012