IELTS Listening Tactics Discussion Questions and Tips

A LESSON PLAN FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHERS

Type: Lesson Plans
Submitted by:
Published: 21st Oct 2013

Below is a preview of the 'IELTS Listening Tactics Discussion Questions and Tips' lesson plan and is automatically generated from the PDF file. While it will look close to the original, there may be formatting differences. It's provided to allow you to view the content of the lesson plan before you download the file.

      Page: /

Lesson Plan Text

13. The first recording starts with an example
14. The information for the first question is usually quite a while after the beginning of each

recording

15. The information for the last question is usually a while before the end of the recording
16. The kinds of interactions in each part of the exam is always the same (one person 

asking questions and making notes, a speech giving instructions on things like using 
the library, a two- or three-way conversation on a topic such as a lecture they’ve just 
heard, and a lecture)

17. The words around a gap will usually be different from the recording
18. The words in a gap will be exactly the same as in the recording
19. There are a limited number of question types (multiple choice, gapfill, summary 

completion, etc)

20. There are no half marks – answers must be completely correct or get no mark
21. There are no strong (native speaker or non-native speaker) accents
22. There are usually some Australian accents
23. There is a bit of extra time to check your answers before the next recording is 

introduced

24. There is often something after the answer that confirms/ reinforces it
25. There is often something before the answer that can help you anticipate that the 

answer is coming

26. There is often something before the answer that can help you anticipate what the 

answer will be

27. There is plenty of time to read through the task before the recording starts
28. They might not spell names which are also common words (e.g. “Mr Brown”)
29. They will spell all names (e.g. of places) which aren’t also common words, e.g. 

Marlborough 

30. Words in gaps must also fit grammatically (e.g. be an adverb if that fits the gap) but 

grammatical words like determiners can sometimes be left out (and sometimes have to
be to stay under the maximum number or words and/ or numbers)

31. Words which aren’t names shouldn’t be written starting with capital letters
32. Writing not enough information can sometimes lead to no mark, e.g. writing “men” 

where the answer should be “tall men”

33. Writing over the given maximum of words and/ or numbers leads to no mark
34. You can also guess during the transferring answers to your answer sheet stage
35. You can only hear each recording once
36. You can usually guess something about what information is needed in gaps, e.g. that it

is a date or length of time

37. You can write numbers as figures rather than words
38. You can write on or underline things on the question paper
39. You have ten minutes to transfer your answers to the answer sheet at the end of the 

test

40. “Double” is sometimes used when dictating numbers and words

Discuss how you can use the things that make the exam easier and tackle the things that 
make the exam more difficult. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Terms of Use

Lesson plans & worksheets can be used by teachers without any fee in the classroom; however, please ensure you keep all copyright information and references to UsingEnglish.com in place.

You will need Adobe Reader to view these files.

Get Adobe Reader