IELTS Speaking Part One- Tips & Phrases

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (109 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

IELTS Speaking Part One Tips and Useful Phrases
What tips would you give someone about doing well in IELTS Speaking Part One?

Cross out tips about IELTS Speaking Part One below that you don’t agree with, then 
compare with the rest of the class
1. Learn more complex time expressions that you can use in your answers 

2. Make each of your answers as long as you can

3. Always answer with the same tense as the question

4. Always correct yourself if you realise you’ve made a grammar mistake or used the 

wrong word

5. Always correct yourself if you’ve said something that you think they won’t understand 

6. If you don’t understand the question, be as specific as you can about what the problem 

is 

7. If you are not sure what the question means after they’ve repeated it, answer it 

anyway 

8. If you still don’t understand, ask again 

9. If you think you understand the question but aren’t sure, mention your understanding 

of the question in your answer

10. If the question doesn’t exactly match your situation, make sure that is reflected in your 

answer 

11. Fill all silences/ Think out loud

12. If you’re not sure of the answer, just use your imagination

13. If you’re not sure of the answer, just say so

14. If you’re not sure of the answer, say so and then answer the question anyway 

15. If you think it’s a strange question, say so

16. If you can’t think of anything to say or can’t answer the question, just say so 

17. Learn complex language to describe your own accommodation, hobbies, studies

Add at least two useful words or phrases to each of the tips that you haven’t crossed off, 
then compare your phrases with those on the next page. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011

Suggested answers
1. Learn more complex time expressions that you can use in your answers - “the day 

before yesterday”, “in the 90s”, “when I was in my early teens”

2. Make each of your answers as long as you can – Not necessary and not a good 

idea because it means you aren’t really communicating and even make the 
examiner think you have memorised your answers

3. Always answer with the same tense as the question – Not necessarily true, although 

probably true at least 80% of the time

4. Always correct yourself if you realise you’ve made a grammar mistake or used the 

wrong word – Not a good idea as it ruins your fluency and ruins communication

5. Always correct yourself if you’ve said something that you think they won’t understand – 

“I meant to say…”, “Let me try and answer that again. I…”, “I’m not sure I’ve 
explained myself properly…”

6. If you don’t understand the question, be as specific as you can about what the problem 

is – “I didn’t understand the last word/ part of the question.”, “What does… 
mean?”, “There was one word I couldn’t understand. Can put it another way?”, 
“Do you mean…?”, “If I understand correctly, you want me to…”, “Should I talk 
about Tokyo, or the city I come from?”

7. If you are not sure what the question means after they’ve repeated it, answer it 

anyway – Not a good idea

8. If you still don’t understand, ask again – “Sorry, I still don’t understand. Could you 

explain what you mean another way?”, “I’m still not quite sure what you mean.”

9. If you think you understand the question but aren’t sure, mention your understanding 

of the question in your answer – “If you mean…, then…”, “I guess you mean… 
Well,…”

10. If the question doesn’t exactly match your situation, make sure that is reflected in your 

answer – “Actually,…”, “In my case,…”, “I can’t exactly answer that, but...” 

11. Fill all silences/ Think out loud – “Well…”, “Hmmmm.”, “Let me think.”, “Let me 

see.”, “That’s a difficult question.”, “I’ve never really thought about that 
before.”, “No one has ever asked me that before.”

12. If you’re not sure of the answer, just use your imagination – This is acceptable, but 

telling the truth would probably produce more complex language

13. If you’re not sure of the answer, just say so – Better to say at least something (see 

below)

14. If you’re not sure of the answer, say so and then answer the question anyway - “I 

don’t remember very well, but…”, “The first thing that comes to mind is…”, “I 
don’t know a lot about this, but I guess…”, “I’m no expert on this, but I would 
imagine…”, “If I remember correctly,…”, “It was a long time ago, but I think…”

15. If you think it’s a strange question, say so – That would be a little rude!
16. If you can’t think of anything to say or can’t answer the question, just say so – “I’m 

afraid I really don’t know.”, “I can’t really remember.”, “It was too long.”, 
“Nothing is coming to mind.”, “I can’t think of anything.”, “My mind’s gone 
blank.”

17. Learn complex language to describe your own accommodation, hobbies, studies – 

Depends on the person learning them

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011