IELTS Writing Part One- Similarities and Differences

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (93 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Similarities and Differences between IELTS Academic Writing Part One Tasks

Use the table below to help you discuss similarities and differences between different 
kinds of IELTS Writing Part One tasks. 

all kinds of task ( = always

do this in Academic Writing

Part One)

almost all kinds of task

no kinds of task (= never do

it)

almost no tasks (= avoid if at

all possible)

line graph

bar chart

table

pie chart

map

process (= flow chart)

labelled diagram

more than one kind

information

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Put these expressions into the boxes on the last page (summarising any long ones):

Compare

Contrast

Describe all of the information given

Describe positions

Select and put the most important information first

Split the information into two main paragraphs and describe them in the second 
sentence of the introduction

Start the main paragraphs with expressions meaning “First” and “Second”

Start your introduction with a very general description of the graph, table, etc (= 
rephrasing the question)

Summarise

Think of what you see as data rather than as a picture

Use one tense all the way through

Write a conclusion giving the reasons for the data being that way

Write approximately 150 words

Write as many words as you can

Write exactly 150 words

Brainstorm useful phrases for doing the ones which are useful.

Compare your ideas with those below the fold.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1. Compare – “Comparing the…”, “(far/ much) …er/ more/ less…”, “(not) as…as…”, 

“similar/ almost the same”

2. Contrast “…,whereas…”, “In contrast,…”, “(almost) the opposite” “While…,…”, “… 

shows a rather/ very different pattern/ trend.”, “We can contrast this with…”,  “… is (a/ 
the) (major) exception…”, “However,…”NOT “On the contrary” PROBABLY NOT “On 
the other hand”

3. Describe positions – “the upper…”, “the top right…”, “to the northeast”, “in the 

southwest”

4. Select and describe the most important information first – “The first thing you 

notice…”, “The most noticeable… is…”, “The biggest/ most noticeable/ most important 
difference/ similarity between the lines/ graphs is…”, 

5. Split the information into two main paragraphs and describe them in the second 

sentence of the introduction – “I will describe… and then…”/ “First, I will .. and after 
that I will…”, In the first paragraph I will… and in the following paragraph I will…”, 
“These two sources will be described in turn below”, “The following two paragraphs will
describe both of these in turn”, “The following paragraph will… and then I will move on 
to…”

6. Start your introduction with a very general description of the graph, table, etc. - “The 

(line) graph/ bar chart (= bar graph)/ pie chart/ map/ table/ diagram…”, “… shows/ 
represents/ compares/ illustrates…”, “information/ data/ figures”

7. Summarise – “Overall,…”, “The main trend…”, “In general,…”, “The thing that stands 

out (most) is…”

8. Think of what you see as data rather than as a picture – “The data/ numbers/figures...”

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013