Learning and Using English Monologues- Active Listening Practice

Level: Intermediate

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (98 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Learning and Using English Monologues- Active Listening Practice

Talk about one (real) experience of when you used English or tried to learn English, e.g. 
one of the topics below like the last conversation that you had in English. Talk about it as 
long as you can. Your partner will listen and try to use as many active listening phrases as 
they can while they are listening. 

Suggested topics to talk about

a (business) meeting

a book

a CD

a children’s…

a coffee shop lesson

a complaint

a conversation (with a native speaker/ with another non-native speaker)

a conversation exchange

a cram school lesson

a date

a debate

a dialogue

a dictionary

a documentary

a graded reader

a lecture

a lesson/ a workshop

a list of phrases

a magazine/ a journal

a movie

a newspaper

a phrase book (for travellers)

a podcast/ an mp3

a poem

a radio programme

a report

a request

a self-study book

a service exchange (in a shop etc)

a Skype conversation

a smartphone app(lication)

a social interaction

a song

a speech

a story

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2016

a successful attempt to communicate

a successful attempt to learn something

a tablet app(lication)

a teleconference/ a video conference

a telephone call

a TV programme

a vocabulary list

a website

an academic paper

an article

an email exchange

an English conversation club

an English language exam

an enquiry

an essay

an interview

an offer

an unsuccessful attempt to communicate

an unsuccessful attempt to learn something 

some comedy

some error correction

some exam practice

some grammar study

some idioms

some online chat

some online training

some pronunciation practice

some self-study

some slang

some software

some vocabulary study

something I learnt by heart

using some flashcards

using English at work

using English as a volunteer

Were there any active listening phrases which you couldn’t use?

Ask about any topics above which you have questions about as a class, sharing your 
experiences of that thing each time.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2016

Suggested active listening phrases
Inviting someone to tell their 
anecdote/ continue their anecdote

Showing you’re listening/ Not listening in 
silence

And did you/ she/ he/ they?
And then?
But why?
Carry on!
Do tell!
Go on!
How did… feel about that?
How did… react?
So, did…?
So, what did… say (about that)?
So,… right?
Tell me more!
What did you do (next)?
What happened (next/ then)?

Absolutely!
Are you?/ Is he?/ Is she?/ Are they?
Did you?/ Did he?/ Did she?/ Did they?
Do you?/ Does he?/ Does she?/ Do they?
Do you (really) think so?
Good idea. 
Got it.
Honestly?/ Seriously?
I know (just) what you mean.
I know!
I see what you mean.
I suppose so, yeah. 
I’m shocked!
Is that right?/ Is that a fact?
Is there?/ Was there?
Makes sense. 
Me too. 
Mmmm hmmm.
No kidding.
No (way)!
Of course./ Sure. 
Oh yeah?
Okay. 
Really?
Right.
(That’s) (so) amazing/ nice/ great/ interesting!
(That’s) no surprise./ You don’t surprise me. 
(That) sounds great/ awful/ terrible.
That’s such (a)…
(That’s) too bad./ That’s a pity./ That’s a shame. 
Urgh!
Were you?/ Was he?/ Was she?/ Were they?
Wow!
Yeah (yeah) (yeah). 
You did what (now)?
You didn’t!/ He didn’t!/ She didn’t!
You surprise me!
You think so?
You’re kidding?
Yuck!
Yup.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2016

Brainstorming active listening phrases
Without looking above, brainstorm suitable phrases into the gaps below. Phrases not 
above are also possible. 
Inviting someone to tell their anecdote/ 
continue their anecdote

Showing you’re listening/ Not listening 
in silence

Use the mixed phrases on the next page to help with the task above, then check with the 
second page. Note that many could go in either column, but if they are clearly asking 
someone to speak they are written in the right-hand column. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2016

Mixed active listening phrases
Absolutely!

And did you/ she/ he/ they?

And then?

Are you?/ Is he?/ Is she?/ Are they?

But why?

Carry on!

Did you?/ Did he?/ Did she?/ Did they?

Do tell!

Do you (really) think so?

Do you?/ Does he?/ Does she?/ Do they?

Go on!

Good idea. 

Got it.

Honestly?/ Seriously?

How did… feel about that?

How did… react?

I know (just) what you mean.

I know!

I see what you mean.

I suppose so, yeah. 

I’m shocked!

Is that right?/ Is that a fact?

Is there?/ Was there?

Makes sense. 

Me too. 

Mmmm hmmm.

No (way)!

No kidding.

Of course./ Sure. 
Oh yeah?
Okay. 
Really?
Right.
So, did…?
So, what did… say (about that)?
So,… right?
Tell me more!
(That) sounds great/ awful/ terrible.
(That’s) no surprise./ You don’t surprise me. 
(That’s) (so) amazing/ nice/ great/ interesting!
That’s such (a)…
(That’s) too bad./ That’s a pity./ That’s a shame. 
Urgh!
Were you?/ Was he?/ Was she?/ Were they?
What did you do (next)?
What happened (next/ then)?
Wow!
Yeah (yeah) (yeah). 
You did what (now)?
You didn’t!/ He didn’t!/ She didn’t!
You surprise me!
You think so?
You’re kidding?
Yuck!
Yup.

Speak about topics above, this time for exactly 90 seconds and with your partner taking 
one paperclip from the middle of the table for each time they use a different active 
listening phrase (of either type above).

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2016