Making Arrangements- Cultural Differences Modal Practice

Level: Intermediate

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Modals

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (93 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Making arrangements cultural differences and useful phrases modals practice
What cultural differences might there be connected to making arrangements (fixing 
meetings, inviting people for dinner, saying no, etc)?

Choose things from below and say what is normal in your country and how that might be 
similar or different in other countries, using verbs like “
should”, “need to”, “must/ have to”, 
can”, “shouldn’t”, “mustn’t”, “don’t have to” and “don’t need to”. 

You __________________ start an email suggesting or changing an arrangement with a 
line saying that like “I’m writing because I’d like to meet…”

You __________________ start an email suggesting or changing an arrangement with a 
more indirect line just mentioning the meeting or its topic

You __________________ use very enthusiastic language when you say yes

You __________________ just say okay or that it is convenient when you say yes

You __________________ start saying no with positive phrases similar to when you say 
yes, then say something like “but”

You __________________ apologise when you say no

You __________________ sound really unhappy/ disappointed that you have to say no

You __________________ just say you are busy, you have another arrangement or it is 
not convenient, without giving details when you say no

You ________________ give very detailed explanations of why when you have to say no

You __________________ use future forms which show that your other arrangements are 
(really) fixed when you say no

You __________________ say no by suggesting other times to meet

You _______________________ mention the next contact when you say goodbye

Put a tick next to the ones above which are probably a good idea in English. In some 
situations there is more than one possibility. 

Discuss as a class, then brainstorm at least one phrase for all of the ones above which are
usually necessary in English, then check with the mixed up answers under the fold.
OR
Check your answers above with the mixed up answers below. The ones which aren’t there
are not good ideas.  

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Mixed answers

I’d love to.
That sounds great. 
That’s perfect.

I’d love to, but…
That would have been great, but…
That would have been perfect. However,…

I’m… ing
I will be… ing

I’m afraid I can’t make it then. 
I’m sorry but…

I’m meeting my boss at exactly that time.
I have a business trip to Osaka and won’t be back until lunchtime. 

I’m writing to you about our meeting next week. 
I’m writing to you in connection with my visit to New York.
I’m writing to you because I will be visiting New York next week.

If possible, I’d prefer…
If you don’t mind, …would be better for me. 

Oh, it’s a shame, but…
Ahh. It’s a real pity, but…
Unfortunately,…

See you then.
See you on Monday.
I look forward to seeing you…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Suggested answers
Start an email suggesting an arrangement with a more indirect line just mentioning 
the meeting or its topic
I’m writing to you about our meeting next week. 
I’m writing to you in connection with my visit to New York.
I’m writing to you because I will be visiting New York next week.

Use very enthusiastic language when you say yes
I’d love to.
That sounds great. 
That’s perfect.

Start saying no with positive phrases similar to when you say yes, then say 
something like “but”
I’d love to, but…
That would have been great, but…
That would have been perfect. However,…

Apologise when you say no
I’m afraid I can’t make it then. 
I’m sorry but…
NOT I’m afraid but… X

Sound really unhappy/ disappointed that you have to say no
Oh, it’s a shame, but…
Ahh. It’s a real pity, but…
Unfortunately,…

Give very detailed explanations of why when you have to say no
I’m meeting my boss at exactly that time.
I have a business trip to Osaka and won’t be back until lunchtime. 

Use future forms which show that your other arrangements are (really) fixed when 
you say no
I’m… ing
I will be… ing
NOT I will… X
NOT I’m going to… X

Say no by suggesting other times to meet
If possible, I’d prefer…
If you don’t mind, …would be better for me. 

Mention the next contact when you say goodbye
See you then.
See you on Monday.
I look forward to seeing you…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Put modal verbs into the making arrangements phrases below

I _______________________________ like to meet next week if you are available then.

I ______________ be very happy to meet you at 7 o’clock, if that is convenient with you. 

That’s fine. I ________________________ just move my other meeting to the afternoon. 

I ______________________________________________________________ love to!

I __________________________________________________________ love to, but…

I _________________________________________ prefer Sunday, if you are free then.

I’m afraid I __________________________________________________ make it then.

________________________________________ we possibly reschedule the meeting?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015