Meeting People- Jigsaw Dialogues and Useful Phrases

Level: Intermediate

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (109 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Meeting People Jigsaw Dialogues and Useful Phrases
Without looking below for now, divide the cards that you are given into three categories:
-

Used when you meet someone for the first time

-

Used when you meet someone again

-

Possible in both situations

Then put all the cards into two conversations in order, one with two people meeting for the 
first time at a conference and the other with two different people meeting again at a 
conference. Both conversations go A B A B etc. All the cards should only be able to go in 
one place, including those which could be suitable in both situations. The two 
conversations are not the same length.
---------------------------------------------------------
Cards to cut up/ Suggested answers
Meeting for the first time

A: Is this the right place for the workshop on international collaboration?

B: Yes, that’s right.

A: Oh good. Thanks. Is this seat free?

B: It seems to be. Feel free to sit there if you like. I don’t think we’ve met, have we?

A: No, I don’t think so. I’m John Smith from Keepsake University.

B: Pleased to meet you, John. My name’s Javier. Javier Grande.

A: It’s a pleasure to meet you, too, Javier. Can I ask who you work for?

B: Universidad de Santa Maria.

A: I’m afraid I haven’t heard of your institution. Where is it based?

B: It’s in Guadalajara. That’s the one in Spain, not the more famous Mexican one. Your

university has a good reputation for robotics, doesn’t it?

A: Yes, we’re doing quite well with that at the moment. In fact, my role is to find funding for

future research of that kind. What do you do?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

B: My duties are quite similar, actually. I’d love to learn more about what you do, but it looks

like the workshop is about to start. Do you have a business card?

A: Yes, I do have one somewhere. Just a moment. Here you are.

B: Thanks. And here’s mine. It was really nice to meet you.

A: You too. I look forward to getting your email.

Meeting again

A: Excuse me, Stephanie? I don’t know if you remember me. It’s Steve. We met at the same

conference a few years ago in Madrid.

B: Of course I remember you, Steve. Long time no see. Great to see you again.

A: It’s lovely to see you too. How long has it been?

B: It must be at least three years. How have you been?

A: Very well, thanks. I’m still in the same job. How about you?

B: I’ve had a bit of a promotion but still doing pretty much the same thing. Are you still

working on data protection?

A: A little, but we’ve basically finished that project. I’m now spending most of my time on

automating stacking.

B: Sounds interesting. Do you still work with Leonardo?

A: Actually, he’s retired, but we still keep in touch. You must meet up with us both next time

you’re in Dresden.

B: I definitely will. Anyway, I’m afraid I still have to meet a few more people before the

conference ends, but I’ll email you in the next couple of days.

A: Of course, no problem. Me too. I’ll let you get on. It was great to see you again. Looking

forward to hearing from you soon.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Without looking above for now, brainstorm phrases with these functions
Meeting for the first time
Starting a conversations with some you don’t know

Introducing yourself

Expressions meaning “Nice to meet you”

Starting and continuing the conversation

Talking about jobs

Talking about business cards

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Meeting again
Starting conversations

Social/ friendly language

Talking about present work

Both situations
Ending the conversation

Look at the jigsaw texts again to look for more suitable phrases, also adding any more you
think of as you are doing so. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Suggested answers
Note that many more phrases are possible.
Meeting for the first time
Starting a conversations with some you don’t know
I don’t think we’ve met, have we?
Is this seat free?
Is this the right place for…?

Introducing yourself
I don’t think we’ve met, have we?
I’m/ My name is (first name)
I’m/ My name is (first name, full name)
I’m/ My name is (full name)

Expressions meaning “Nice to meet you”
It’s a pleasure to meet you (too) (name)
Pleased to meet you (too) (name)

Starting and continuing the conversation
Can I ask who you work for?
I’m afraid I haven’t heard of…
What do you do?
Where is… based?
Your… has a good reputation for…, doesn’t it

Talking about jobs
My duties are…
My role is to…
I’d love to learn more about what you do
I’m responsible for…

Talking about business cards
Do you have a business card?
Yes, I do have one somewhere. Just a moment. Here you are.
And here’s mine.
Maybe we should exchange business cards.
Can I give you business card?
I see that you…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Meeting again
Starting conversations
Excuse me, (name)?
I don’t know if you remember me. 
It’s (name).
We met at…
Of course I remember you, (name).

Social/ friendly language
(It’s) great/ lovely to see you (again) (too).
Long time no see. 
(Yes), it’s been ages, hasn’t it?
How long has it been?
How have you been?
I’m still…
How about you?
Are you still…?
Do you still work with (name)?

Talking about present work
I’m still…
Are you still working on…?
What are you working on (at the moment)?
I’m working on…
We’ve (basically) finished…
I’m now spending most of my time (on)…
Sounds interesting.

Both situations
Ending the conversation
I’d love to learn more… but…
It looks like… is about to start.
It was really nice to meet you.
You too. I look forward to giving you more details when I get your email.
You must meet up with me/ us both (next time you’re in)…
Anyway, I’m afraid I still have to (meet a few more people before the conference ends, but 
I’ll email you in the next couple of days.
I’ll let you get on.
It was great to see you again. 
Looking forward to hearing from you soon.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014