Meeting People- Key Words, Phrases, Dialogues and Topics

Level: Intermediate

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (182 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Meeting People- Key Words, Phrases, Dialogues and Topics
Part One: Personalised realistic roleplays

Describe a situation in which you have to speak English when you meet people face to 
face, for the first time or meeting again, describing factors like this:
1

Arranged meeting?/ Meeting by chance?

2

Venue (= place where you meet, e.g. conference/trade fair, reception of your building, 
meeting room in their building, cafeteria, lift, airport, plane, bus, train, station, hotel)

3

You travelled to the venue?/ The other person travelled to the venue?/ Both?

4

Meeting for the first time?/ Meeting again?

5

What you already know about each other (names, company, role, family, country, etc)

6

Previous contact with that person (previous meeting, telephone to arrange the 
meeting, email to send an agenda for the meeting, etc) and time since then

7

Formality (very formality/ formal/ medium formality/ fairly informal/ very casual)

8

Good topics of conversation (venue, things going on around you, sport, weather, 
travel, countries, companies, jobs/ roles, the last time you were in contact, people you 
both know, food and drink, business conditions, present projects, products/ services, 
etc)

9

Exchange business cards?/ Already exchanged business cards?

10 What will happen after the small talk (really start the meeting, have to meet other 

people, introduce to others, back to work, back to your desk, take to a meeting room, 
event starting, reach your floor, etc)

Roleplay that situation with your partner, with you as yourself and your partner as the 
foreign person who you will meet. If you are roleplaying the small talk before a business 
meeting, don’t discuss the actual agenda of the meeting, just skip to the similar social 
language at the end. Note that the list above is not a format for such a conversation, it’s 
just background information that your partner will need to play their role. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

If you haven’t already, roleplay meeting someone for the first time and then meeting the 
same person again, using the example situations below to help if you like. 

Imaginary example situation 1
1

Meeting by chance

2

Conference or trade fair

3

Both travelled to the venue

4

Meeting for the first time

5

Know nothing about each other

6

No previous contact with that person

7

Medium formality 

8

Good topics of conversation: things going on around you, companies, jobs/ roles 

9

Exchange business cards

10 Event starting, but will email each other later in the week

Imaginary example situation 2
1

Meeting by chance

2

Conference or trade fair

3

Both travelled to the venue

4

Meeting again

5

Already know names, companies, jobs/ roles, countries, etc

6

Met at the same event two years ago and emailed just after

7

Fairly informal

8

Good topics of conversation: business conditions, products, people you both know

9

Already exchanged business cards

10 Have to talk to other people but will email later and hopefully meet up again 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Meeting people key words, phrases, dialogues and topics 
Part Two: Jigsaw dialogues
Without looking below for now, divide the cards that you are given into three categories:
-

Used when you meet someone for the first time

-

Used when you meet someone again

-

Possible in both situations

Then put all the cards into two conversations in order, one with two people meeting for the 
first time at a conference and the other with two different people meeting again at a 
conference. Both conversations go A B A B etc. All the cards should only be able to go in 
one place, including those which could be suitable in both situations. The two 
conversations are not the same length.

Check your answers with un-cut-up versions of the worksheet, test your partner on their 
ability to answer phrases from below (with true information about them), then roleplay the 
same two situations. 
---------------------------------------------------------

Cards to cut up/ Suggested answers

Meeting for the first time

 A: Is this the right place for the workshop on Lloyds of London?

B: Yes, that’s right. That’s what I’m here for too. 

A: Oh good. Thanks. Is this seat free?

B: Yes, it is. Please take a seat. It’s really busy, isn’t it?

A: Yes, it is, isn’t it? I’m John, by the way. John Smith, from AIU. 

B: Pleased to meet you, John. My name’s Javier. Javier Grande.

A: It’s a pleasure to meet you, too, Javier. Who do you work for?

B: I work for Swiss Re. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

A: Where is it based?

B: Its HQ is in Zurich, in Switzerland. What do you do, John?

A: I’m in charge of marketing for new products. How about you?

B: My duties are almost the same as yours, actually. I’d like to learn more about what you

do, but the workshop is going to start. Do you have a business card?

A: Yes, I do have one somewhere. Just a moment. Here you are.

B: Thanks. And here’s mine. It was really nice to meet you. I’ll email you later this week. 

A: It was great to meet you, too. I look forward to hearing from you.

Meeting again

A: Excuse me, Javier? It’s John. We met at this conference two years ago.

B: Wow, John! Long time no see. Great to see you again.

A: It’s lovely to see you too. How are you?

B: I’m fine, thanks. How about you? How’s business?

A: Very good, thanks. Our new product is selling well. Do you still work with Leonardo?

B: Yes, I do. You must come for dinner with us next time you come to Belgium.

A: I’d love to! Anyway, I’m afraid I have to speak to a few more people before the

conference ends, but I’ll email you sometime next week.

B: Of course, no problem. Me too. It was great to see you again. Looking forward to

hearing from you soon.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Meeting people key words, phrases, dialogues and topics
Part Three: Useful phrases for meeting people and meeting people again
Stand up and go around roleplaying meeting people in the room, imagining it is the first 
time you have met (even you have had previous contact by email etc.) 

Do the same, but imagining you are meeting again.

Brainstorm things to say in each of those situations. 

Without looking at the worksheet below, listen to your teacher and hold up the correct card
depending on whether what you hear is someone you say when you meet someone face 
to face for the very first time (1

st

) or when you meet someone for a second or subsequent 

time (Again).

Decide if the language in each section below is for meeting people the first time (1

st

) or 

meeting people again (Again) (usually at the beginning of the conversation, but sometimes
at the end). 

Can I ask your name, please?

I’m sorry, I didn’t catch your name.

And you are?

Do you have a business card (on you)?

Perhaps we should exchange business cards.

Glad to meet you. 

Delighted to meet you.

I’ve been looking forward to meeting you. I’ve heard so much about you.

Good afternoon. I have an appointment with (name). 

Hi, I’m here to see (name). 

I’m supposed to meet (name). Is that you (by any chance)?

How was your weekend?/ Did you have a good weekend?

How was your trip?

How’s business?

How’s work?

How’s it going?

How are things?

How’s life?

How’s your project going?

What are you working on at the moment?/ Are you still working on…?

Did you see the game between… and… (last night)?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

I don’t know if you remember me, but…

(name)? It’s (name). We met…/ It’s (name), right? It’s (name). We… together. 

Long time no see. How have you been?

I don’t think we’ve been introduced./ I don’t think we’ve met.

May I introduce myself?/ I should probably introduce myself. 

Is anyone sitting here?/ Is this seat free?

Is this the right place for...?

It’s really hot/ humid/ busy/ crowded, isn’t it?

Is this your first time in…?

Did you have any trouble finding us?/ Did you have any problems finding us?

It was a pleasure to meet you.

It was nice meeting you.

It was so nice to finally meet you (face to face).

It was great to see you (again).

It was really nice to catch up.

It was so nice to see you (again). 

It’s been lovely to see you (again). 

It’s so nice to finally meet you (face to face). 

(It’s) very nice to meet you.

Pleased to meet you. 

It’s a pleasure to meet you. 

It’s so nice to see you (again).

It’s great to see you (again). 

It’s lovely to see you (again). 

It’s (all) written on my business card.

Let me give you my business card.

Here’s my business card.

I’m (name), by the way

forgot to introduce myself. I’m (name)

My name is (name) and I…

Please call me (name).

We’ve emailed each other but…

We’ve spoken many times on the phone, but…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

What do you do?/ What’s your job?

What exactly do you do (in your job)?/ What are your duties?/ What’s your role?

What is your bestselling product?/ What is your most famous product?

Where is your company based?

Where have you come from today?/ Did you have to come far today?

Where are you from?/ Where do you come from

Who do you work for?

What does your company do?/ What kind of company do you work for?

What does your division/ department/ section/ team do?

You must be (name).

Excuse me, are you (name)?/ I’m sorry. Are you (name)?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Brainstorm at least two of each of these categories into the spaces below
Meeting for the first time
Checking if it’s the person that you think it is

Other ways of smoothly starting the conversation/ Leading into an introduction 

Meeting someone who you’ve had other contact with

Giving your own name

Asking for names

Expressions meaning “Nice to meet you”

Making conversation/ Chatting/ Small talk (company, hometown, etc)

Discussing business cards

Like “Nice to meet you”, but at the end of the conversation

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Meeting again
Starting conversations

Expressions meaning “Nice to see you (again)”

Meeting again after a long time

Expressions like “How are you?”

Making conversation/ Chatting/ Small talk (projects, family, etc)

Like “Nice to see you (again)”, but at the end of the conversation

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Use these words to help with the task above. If there are words divided with a forward 
slash, there is more than one similar phrase. 
Meeting for the first time
Checking if it’s the person that you think it is

appointment

here

supposed

must

excuse/ sorry

Other ways of smoothly starting the conversation/ Leading into an introduction 

sitting/ seat

right

isn’t it?

introduced/ met

introduce

Meeting someone who you’ve had other contact with

emailed

phone

Giving your own name

name

call

way

forgot

Asking for names

ask

catch

and

Expressions meaning “Nice to meet you”

finally

very

pleased

pleasure

glad

delighted

forward

Making conversation/ Chatting/ Small talk

do

exactly/ duties/ role

who

company

division/ department/ section/ team

product

based

first

finding

come

from

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Discussing business cards

have

exchange

written

let

here

Like “Nice to meet you”, but at the end of the conversation

pleasure

meeting

finally

Meeting again
Starting conversations
Expressions meaning “Nice to see you (again)”

so

great

lovely

Meeting again after a long time

remember

we

long

Expressions like “How are you?”

going

things

life

business

work

weekend

trip

Making conversation/ Chatting/ Small talk

project

working on

game

Like “Nice to see you (again)”, but at the end of the conversation

so

lovely

great

catch

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Suggested answers
Meeting for the first time
Checking if it’s the person that you think it is

Good afternoon. I have an appointment with (name). 

Hi, I’m here to see (name). 

I’m supposed to meet (name). Is that you (by any chance)?

You must be (name).

Excuse me, are you (name)?/ I’m sorry. Are you (name)?

Other ways of smoothly starting the conversation/ Leading into an introduction 

Is anyone sitting here?/ Is this seat free?

Is this the right place for...?

It’s really hot/ humid/ busy/ crowded, isn’t it?

I don’t think we’ve been introduced./ I don’t think we’ve met.

May I introduce myself?/ I should probably introduce myself. 

Meeting someone who you’ve had other contact with

We’ve emailed each other but…

We’ve spoken many times on the phone, but…

Giving your own name

My name is (name) and I…

Please call me (name). 

I’m…, by the way

forgot to introduce myself. I’m…

Asking for names

Can I ask your name, please?

I’m sorry, I didn’t catch your name.

And you are?

Expressions meaning “Nice to meet you”

It’s so nice to finally meet you (face to face). 

(It’s) very nice to meet you.

Pleased to meet you. 

It’s a pleasure to meet you. 

Glad to meet you. 

Delighted to meet you.

I’ve been looking forward to meeting you. I’ve heard so much about you.

Making conversation/ Chatting/ Small talk

What do you do?/ What’s your job?

What exactly do you do (in your job)?/ What are your duties?/ What’s your role?

Who do you work for?

What does your company do?/ What kind of company do you work for?

What does your division/ department/ section/ team do?

What is your bestselling product?/ What is your most famous product?

Where is your company based?

Is this your first time in…?

Did you have any trouble finding us?/ Did you have any problems finding us?

Where have you come from today?/ Did you have to come far today?

Where are you from?/ Where do you come from

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Discussing business cards

Do you have a business card (on you)?

Perhaps we should exchange business cards.

It’s (all) written on my business card.

Let me give you my business card.

Here’s my business card.

Like “Nice to meet you”, but at the end of the conversation

It was a pleasure to meet you.

It was nice meeting you.

It was so nice to finally meet you (face to face).

Meeting again
Starting conversations
Expressions meaning “Nice to see you (again)”

It’s so nice to see you (again).

It’s great to see you (again). 

It’s lovely to see you (again). 

Meeting again after a long time

I don’t know if you remember me, but…

(name)? It’s (name). We met…/ It’s (name), right? It’s (name). We… together. 

Long time no see. How have you been?

Expressions like “How are you?”

How’s it going?

How are things?

How’s life?

How’s business?

How’s work?

How was your weekend?/ Did you have a good weekend?

How was your trip?

Making conversation/ Chatting/ Small talk

How’s your project going?

What are you working on at the moment?/ Are you still working on…?

Did you see the game between… and… (last night)?

Like “Nice to see you (again)”, but at the end of the conversation

It was so nice to see you (again). 

It’s been lovely to see you (again). 

It was great to see you (again).

It was really nice to catch up.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Do the same for these new categories:
Making conversation (when meeting for the first time or meeting again)

Introducing other people

Signalling that the conversation is coming to an end/ Smoothly ending the 
conversation

Giving reasons for ending the conversation

Talking about the next contact between you

Good wishes for something that the other person will do in the future

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Key words
Use these words to help with the task above
Making conversation (when meeting for the first time or meeting again)

journey/ flight

weather

the news

how long

hotel

staying

here

Introducing other people

this

met

may/ can

like

Signalling that the conversation is coming to an end/ Smoothly ending the 
conversation

interesting

more

time

hear

fascinating

productive

Giving reasons for ending the conversation

someone

meeting

busy

train

Talking about the next contact between you

check

email

phone

later/ now

next/ on/ then

soon

around

chance

Good wishes for something that the other person will do in the future

luck

time

fun

trip

weekend

care/ voyage/ journey

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Suggested answers
Many other answers, but with and without these key words, so please check other phrases
that you wrote with your teacher. 
Making conversation (when meeting for the first time or meeting again)

How was your journey?/ How was your flight?

How the weather in… (now)?

Your company was in the news yesterday…

How long are you here?/ How long will you be here? 

What’s your hotel like?/ How’s your hotel

Where are you staying?/ Are you staying near here?

Why are you here today?/ What brings you here today?

Introducing other people

This is (my/ the…) (name). 

Have you met…?/ I don’t think you’ve met...

May I introduce you to…?/ Can I introduce you to…?

I’d like to introduce you to…

Signalling that the conversation is coming to an end/ Smoothly ending the 
conversation

Well, it’s been really interesting talking to you but…

So, I’d love to speak more but…

Well then, I’m really glad we had this time to talk but…

So then, it was great to hear about your job, but…

Okay then, this has been fascinating, but…

Okay, this has been very productive, but…

Giving reasons for ending the conversation

I’m afraid there’s someone I really need to speak to.

I have a meeting in five minutes, so…

I know you are really busy, so…

I have a train to catch, so…/ My train leaves in ten minutes, so…

Talking about the next contact between you

I’ll check with my boss and…

As I said, I’ll email about…

I’ll phone you about…

See you later./ Bye for now.

See you next…/ See you on…/ See you then

See you soon.

See you around.  

I hope we have the chance to meet again soon. 

Good wishes for something that the other person will do in the future

Good luck with…

(I hope you) have a good time.

(I hope you) have fun.

Have a good trip

(I hope you) have a good weekend.

Take care./ Bon voyage./ Have a safe journey.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Meeting people roleplays, dialogues, key words and phrases
Part Three: Useful phrases for meeting people and meeting people again
Photocopiable cards for students to hold up

The first

time

Again

The first

time

Again

The first

time

Again

The first

time

Again

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Meeting people key words, phrases, dialogues and topics
Part Four: Replies
Without looking above yet, try to think of/ remember phrases which take these replies. 
Sometimes more than one original statement or question is possible. If there is more than 
one thing on a line below, they can be used in reply to the same thing. 

Good idea. Let me just find mine.

Great. Looking forward to hearing from you. 

I do. Just a moment while I find them. 

I hope so too. 

I work for Kobe Steel./ I work for a Japanese raw materials company. 

I’m a sales rep. 

I’m in charge of customer support in the Middle East and North Africa./ I help develop 
new products./ I’m responsible for…/ I have to…

I’m Japanese./ I’m from Aichi in Northern Japan. 

It checks quality and helps improve processes. 

It has been ages, hasn’t it? 

It is actually. It’s great to be here./ Actually, yes. I’ve always wanted to visit./ It’s my 
second time, but I haven’t been here for ages. 

It mainly produces raw materials like steel and copper. 

It was great to see you too. 

It’s lovely to see you too. 

It’s so nice to finally meet you too. 

Just Shinagawa, so not too far./ We came straight from New York, actually.

Just two days this time./ I have to leave tomorrow, unfortunately.  

Nice to meet you (name). I’m (name). 

No, I don’t think we have. I’m (name). 

No, it’s free. Please take a seat. 

No, no problems at all. The map you sent was very clear thanks. 

Not bad./ Fine/ Great!/ Good/ Very well + thanks/ thank you. + And you?/ How about 
you?/ What about you?

Of course I remember you. Long time no see. 

Of course, I’ll let you get on./ No problem, thanks for talking to me. 

Of course.

Our HQ is in Kobe, Japan./ Our head office is in Western Japan. 

Pleased to meet you too. 

Thank you very much. Here’s mine. 

Thanks. You too. 

That’s me. Thanks for coming. 

That’s right. You must be (name). 

Very comfortable, thanks. 

We’re quite well-known for stainless steel and aluminium. 

Yes, it is, isn’t it?

Yes, that’s right./ I hope so! That’s what I’m here for too. 

Yes. Please go ahead. 

Look on the previous worksheets to help check your answers, then check with the answer 
key below. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Suggested answers
Note that the phrases above are in alphabetical order, not the same order as above. Other
answers might be possible, so please ask your teacher if you think you have other 
possibilities. 

Meeting for the first time
Starting the conversation/ Leading into an introduction
 

Is anyone sitting here? – No, it’s free. Please take a seat. 

Is this seat free? – Yes. Please go ahead. 

Is this the right place for...? – Yes, that’s right./ I hope so! That’s what I’m here for too. 

It’s really hot/ humid/ busy/ crowded, isn’t it? – Yes, it is, isn’t it?

I don’t think we’ve been introduced./ I don’t think we’ve met. – No, I don’t think we 
have. I’m (name). 

May I introduce myself?/ I should probably introduce myself. – Of course.

Checking if it’s the person that you think it is

Good afternoon. I have an appointment with (name)./ Hi, I’m here to see (name).  – 
That’s me. Thanks for coming. 

I’m supposed to meet (name). Is that you (by any chance)?/ You must be (name)./ 
Excuse me, are you (name)?/ I’m sorry. Are you (name)? – That’s right. You must be 
(name). 

Giving your own name

My name is (name) and I…/ I’m…, by the way./ I forgot to introduce myself. I’m… - 
Nice to meet you (name). I’m (name). 

Expressions meaning “Nice to meet you”

It’s so nice to finally meet you (face to face). – It’s so nice to finally meet you too. 

Pleased to meet you. – Pleased to meet you too. 

Making conversation

What do you do?/ What’s your job? – I’m a sales rep. 

What exactly do you do (in your job)?/ What are your duties?/ What’s your role? – I’m 
in charge of customer support in the Middle East and North Africa./ I help develop new 
products./ I’m responsible for…/ I have to… 

Who do you work for? – I work for Kobe Steel./ I work for a Japanese raw materials 
company. 

What does your company do?/ What kind of company do you work for? – It mainly 
produces raw materials like steel and copper. 

What does your division/ department/ section/ team do? – It checks quality and helps 
improve processes. 

What is your bestselling product?/ What is your most famous product? – We’re quite 
well-known for stainless steel and aluminium. 

Where is your company based? – Our HQ is in Kobe, Japan./ Our head office is in 
Western Japan. 

Is this your first time in…? – It is actually. It’s great to be here./ Actually, yes. I’ve 
always wanted to visit./ It’s my second time, but I haven’t been here for ages. 

Did you have any trouble finding us?/ Did you have any problems finding us? – No, no 
problems at all. The map you sent was very clear thanks. 

Where have you come from today?/ Did you have to come far today? – Just 
Shinagawa, so not too far./ We came straight from New York, actually.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Where are you from?/ Where do you come from? – I’m Japanese./ I’m from Aichi in 
Northern Japan. 

Discussing business cards

Do you have a business card (on you)? – I do. Just a moment while I find them. 

Perhaps we should exchange business cards. – Good idea. Let me just find mine.

Here’s my business card. – Thank you very much. Here’s mine. 

Like “Nice to meet you” at the end of the conversation

It was a pleasure to meet you. – It was a pleasure to meet you too. 

Meeting again
Starting conversations
Expressions meaning “Nice to see you (again)”

It’s lovely to see you (again). – It’s lovely to see you too. 

Meeting again after a long time

I don’t know if you remember me, but… - Of course I remember you. Long time no 
see. 

Long time no see. How have you been? – It has been ages, hasn’t it? 

Expressions like “How are you?”

How’s it going?/ How are things?/ How’s life?/ How’s business?/ How’s work?/ How 
was your weekend? - Not bad./ Fine/ Great!/ Good/ Very well + thanks/ thank you. + 
And you?/ How about you?/ What about you?

Expressions like “Nice to see you (again)” at the end of the conversation

It was great to see you (again). – It was great to see you too. 

Making conversation (when meeting for the first time or meeting again)

How long are you here?/ How long will you be here? – Just two days this time./ I have 
to leave tomorrow, unfortunately.  

What’s your hotel like?/ How’s your hotel? – Very comfortable, thanks. 

Giving reasons for ending the conversation

I’m afraid there’s someone I really need to speak to./ I have a meeting in five minutes, 
so…/ I have a train to catch, so…/ My train leaves in ten minutes, so… – Of course, I’ll 
let you get on./ No problem, thanks for talking to me. 

Talking about the next contact between you

I’ll check with my boss and…/ As I said, I’ll email about…/ I’ll phone you about… - 
Great. Looking forward to hearing from you. 

I hope we have the chance to meet again soon. – I hope so too. 

Good wishes for something that the other person will do in the future

Good luck with…/ (I hope you) have a good time./ (I hope you) have fun./ Have a good
trip./ (I hope you) have a good weekend./ Take care./ Bon voyage./ Have a safe 
journey. – Thanks. You too. 

Test each other in pairs, then start and continue conversations with those phrases. 

What are good topics and questions to continue conversations?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Part Five: The same or different
Without looking below, listen to two or more expressions and raise the “The same” or 
“Different” cards depending on their meanings. Then label the lines below with S for the 
same or D for different. If there are more than two, they are all the same or all different. If 
you get stuck, skip to the next one as it might help. 

Good evening./ Good night.

Is anyone sitting here?/ Is this seat free?

Can I introduce myself?/ May I introduce myself?

I’m Alex./ My name is Alex. 

I’m Alex./ This is Alex.

Can I ask your name?/ What’s your name?

Nice to meet you./ Pleased to meet you./ How do you do?/ It’s a pleasure to meet you./
Glad to meet you. 

It’s so nice to meet you./ It’s so nice to see you (again).

It’s so nice to finally meet you (face to face)./ It’s so nice to see you (again).

 

How are you?/ How do you do?

How are you?/ How about you?

And you?/ How about you?/ What about you?

How are you?/ Are you okay?

Are you okay?/ What’s wrong?/ What’s the matter?

How are you?/ How’s it going?/ How are things?/ How’s life?

How are you?/ How have you been?

How was your week?/ How has your week been?

How’s business?/ How’s work?

How was your trip?/ How was your journey?/ How was your flight?

I’m fine, thank you./ Very well, thank you./ Not bad, thanks. 

Not bad./ So so.

So so./ Not so good. 

How do you do?/ What do you do?

What do you do?/ How’s your job?

What’s your job?/ What do you do?

What do you do?/ What are you working on?

It was nice meeting you./ It was nice to meet you./ Nice meeting you.  

Nice to meet you./ It was nice to meet you.

It was nice to meet you./ It was a pleasure to meet you.

See you sometime./ See you on Monday. 

See you later./ See you soon.

See you then./ See you, then.

See you sometime./ I look forward to seeing you again sometime.  

Check your answers, test each other and then hold conversations using the expressions. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Part Six: Good and bad questions and topics for making conversation
Choose questions from below which you think might prompt good conversation with your 
partner and ask the questions, with follow up questions if you like. Were you right that 
those were good questions?

Are there any good… near here?

Are you (originally) from (around) here?

Are you allergic to anything?

Are you married?

Are you religious?

Can you eat raw fish?

Can you recommend… near here/ in (name of place)?

Can you use chopsticks?

Did you get much done this week?/ Have you had a productive week?

Did you have a good weekend?/ How was your weekend?

Did you have any trouble finding us?/ Did you have any problems finding us?

Did you hear (the news) about…?

Did you hear the weather forecast (for today/ tonight/ this weekend/…)?

Did you see the game/ match between… and… (last night)?

Do you do any sports?

Do you drink alcohol?

Do you drive?

Do you eat meat?

Do you follow football/ any team/ any Spanish teams?

Do you have any children?/ Do you plan to have children?

Do you have any pets?

Do you have any plans for the weekend?

Do you know (name)?

Do you know what time…?

Do you like/ What do you think about (name of famous person)?

Do you like… food?

Do you live near here?

Do you own any shares?

Do you smoke?

Do you watch…?

Do you work near here?

Do you work with (name)?

Have you been busy?/ Been busy?

Have you ever been to…?/ Have you ever visited…?

Have you ever read/ seen…?

Have you heard from (name) recently?

Have you read any good books/ seen any good movies recently?

Have you tried… food?

How are you (today)?

How are you feeling?

How are your family?

How is (name)?

How long are you here?/ How long will you be here? 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

How long have you been… ing…?

How much did your house cost?

How much do you earn?/ How much money do you make?

How much do you weigh?

How old are you?

How tall are you?

How the weather in… (now)?

How was your journey?/ How was the traffic?/ How was your flight?

How was your week?/ How has your week been (so far)?

How’s business?

How’s the weather (outside now)?

How’s work?

How’s your love life?

How’s your project going?

Is it going to rain/ snow (do you think)?

Is there anywhere good to eat around here?

Is this your first time in (name of place where you are)?

Is… a safe place?

Is… popular in your country?

Nice/ Lovely/ Terrible/ Horrible weather, isn’t it?

That’s a nice… Where did you buy it?/ How much did it cost?

Wasn’t your company in the news yesterday?

What are you doing here?

What are you working on (at the moment)?/ Are you still working on…?

What did you study at university?

What do you do?/ What’s your job?

What do you think about Prime Minister/ President…?

What do you think about… women?

What does your company do?/ What kind of company do you work for?

What does your division/ department/ section/ team do?

What exactly do you do (in your job)?/ What are your duties?/ What’s your role?

What is it like, working for…?

What is your bestselling product?/ What is your most famous product?

What’s your hotel like?/ How’s your hotel? 

Where are you from?/ Where do you come from? 

Where are you staying?/ Are you staying near here?

Where are your parents from?

Where have you come from today?/ Did you have to come far today?

Where is your company based?

Where is your family from?

Which part of… do you live in?

Which university did you go to?

Who did you fly with?

Who do you work for?

Why are you here today?/ What brings you here today?

Do the same, but pretending that you have never met before. 
What topics are good/ easy and bad/ difficult for starting and continuing conversations?
 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Brainstorm topics of conversation into these three categories:

Good topics of

conversation even with

strangers

Good topics of

conversation with people

you know

Taboo topics of

conversation

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Rank and discuss the easy and taboo topics game
Work in groups of two to five. Without looking below, take one or two cards each and work 
together to decide which card is:
1 Very easy/ good topics of conversation, even with strangers
2 Fairly easy/ good topics of conversation, including with people who you don’t know 

(well)

3 Okay/ a little difficult topics of conversation
4 Fairly difficult topics of conversation (although maybe okay with friends) 
5 Very difficult or absolutely taboo topics of conversation, best avoided
All are classified for British people, so might be different for people in your country. 

Compare your answers with those on the pages below. They are the same as order as 
written above. Are there any which are surprising/ different for people in your country?

Choose a category that you want someone to ask you a question on. You will get that 
many points if you can answer the question fully, or some part of that many points if you 
can answer it partly, e.g. 2 points for half answering a 5 point question. You don’t get any 
points for refusing to answer the question, but here are some useful phrases for doing so:
I’d rather not answer that (if you don’t mind).          I’m sorry, that’s rather personal.
I’m afraid we don’t really talk about that in my culture. 
----------------------------------------

(Recent) movies and TV programmes

America

Cars (e.g. something on the TV show Top Gear)

Celebrities (= famous people)

Complaints about a place you both work or live

Complaints about politicians

Complaints about transport

Drinking

Favourite sportsmen

First names

Football

Free time/ Hobbies

Hometowns

Hotels

How busy you are

International news stories

People who you both know

Pets

Places you have and haven’t lived/ visited

Precise job title and what exactly you do (= details about your jobs)

Sightseeing in this/ your area

The room or building which you are in

The weather

Travel (e.g. to the place you are now, commuting, or travel abroad)

Your bad points

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

-----------------------------------------------------------

Airports/ Airlines

Allergies

Bargains/ How much you saved (for example in the summer sales)

Books

China

Complaints about your children and husbands/ wives

Cooking/ Food

Crime

DIY

Exercise/ Sports

Gardening

Gay people who you know

Holidays

Relationships between your countries and their closest neighbours

Relationships between your countries and their former colonies

Which school/ university you went to

Smoking

Sports teams which you support

Start a conversation with a taxi driver

Start a conversation with the bar staff (if you are sitting at the bar)

Vegetarianism (= not eating meat)

Which newspaper (or newspaper’s website) you read

Young people nowadays

------------------------------------------------------------

Age

Climate change

Complaints about the police

Dieting

Domestic news (= news about your own countries)

Fashion

How good-looking (or not) men and women are in your countries

Property prices in your country/ area

Publically owned broadcasters (BBC, ABC, NPR, NHK, etc.)

Scandals/ Negative news involving your companies

Seasonal changes

Start a conversation at the bar with another customer

Start a conversation at a bus stop

Suggest splitting the bill

The food that you are both eating

The history of your countries

Where you buy your clothes

WWI/ WWII

The death penalty

------------------------------------------------------------

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Banking

Baseball

Censorship

Complain about the food to a waiter

Great things about your country

Dating

Discussing business/ Negotiating during drinks after work

How you really feel

Independence movements in parts of the country (e.g. Scottish independence)

Personal investments

Personal achievements

Political extremism in your countries (= far right and extreme left)

Poverty (= poor people)

Previous political leaders of your countries (Tony Blair etc.)

Stand up and introduce yourself

Start a conversation on the bus or train

The 2008 financial crisis

The royal family

The sex industry (hostess bars, “massage parlours”, etc.)

Unions/ Industrial action

What areas you live in

What your houses cost

Which political parties you are against

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Animal rights

Body weight

Complaints about the other person’s country or area

Complement each other

Expensive things you have paid for

Gay marriage

Health problems/ Medical problems you have had

Immigration

Marital state (= married, single, divorced, etc.)

Nationalism/ Patriotism

Nuclear power

Parenting (= different ways to bring up your children)

Plans to have (more) children

Race

Religion

Salary/ Bonus

Sexism

Social class (working class, middle class, etc.)

Terrorism/ The war on terror

Trade pacts your countries belong to or could join (e.g. the EU)

Welfare payments (unemployment benefit etc.)

Which political parties you support

Your personal experience of the sex industry (strip shows etc.)

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015