Nouns that are usually uncountable dictation

Level: Beginner

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Nouns

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (113 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Words Which are Usually Uncountable- List Dictation

Without looking at the next page, listen to your teacher read lists of similar things and try 
to work out how they are related. They will start with the most difficult to guess from each 
time. When you think have worked out what the category is, put up your hand and say 
“They are all kinds of…” Each person can only guess once in each round, so don’t guess 
until you are quite sure. You must get exactly the category that the teacher has written on 
the worksheet, so make sure your guess is specific enough. 

All the examples you heard have something in common. Can you guess what?

All the examples you heard can be divided into two categories. Can you guess what they 
are? 

(Look at the examples on the next page to help if you get stuck with either of the questions 
above).

Divide the things on the next page into (A) things that are usually uncountable (B) 
uncountable categories that have countable examples. If you get stuck, try adding s to the 
examples and see whether they sound right or not. 

A

B

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2012

Words which are usually uncountable list dictation 
Script

abstract noun – happiness, wealth, joy, misery, poverty

accommodation – hut, serviced apartment, tent, caravan, B&B, villa, log cabin, bunga-
low, self-catering flat, holiday home, mobile home, condo, maisonette, camper van, ig-
loo, 

alcohol - champagne, rum, bitter, mild, IPA, pale ale, rosé, vodka, stout, porter, cider, 

bedding –quilt, fitted sheet, pillow case, duvet, valence, blanket, bedspread

building  material  –  sand,  marble,  mortar,  concrete,  cement,  wood,  paint,  wallpaper, 
flooring, 

condiment  –  ketchup,  soy  sauce,  Tabasco,  brown  sauce,  salt,  pepper,  English  mus-
tard, chutney, pickle, mayonnaise

crockery – plate, soup bowl, saucer, mug, side plate, 

cutlery –table spoon, soup spoon, fish fork, steak knife, disposable chopstick

dessert – jelly, ice cream, trifle, rhubarb crumble, meringue, sorbet, 

detergent – fabric softener, washing powder, washing up liquid, hand soap

drug – cocaine, marihuana, heroin, crack, speed

fabric/ cloth – denim, polyester, Lycra, hemp, jute, lace, wool, cashmere 

footwear - slip on, high heel, trainer, plimsoll, clog, welly, flip flop/ thong, 

fruit – apple, Satsuma, mandarin, pear, pineapple, 

furniture – armchair, dinner table, kitchen chair, swivel chair, filing cabinet, sideboard, 
chest of drawers, dresser, queen-sized bed, futon/ sofa-bed

fuel – coal, petrol, paraffin, diesel

gas – oxygen, CO2, hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, methane

hair care product – conditioner, hairspray, gel, Brylcream

ingredient for baking – flour, margarine, water, egg white, icing sugar, yeast 

ism – surrealism, communism, socialism, fascism, anarchism

jewellery – engagement ring, wedding ring, dangly earring

lighting – desk lamp, fluorescent strip, LED bulb, torch

liquid in a car – oil, brake fluid, antifreeze, water

liquid in the garage – oil, brake fluid, paint, white spirit

liquid in the kitchen – vinegar, sauce, oil, soya milk, soy sauce

literature – poem, novel, novella, short story, play

luggage – knapsack, sack, briefcase, suitcase, backpack, satchel, rucksack, handbag, 
shoulder bag, attaché case

make up – foundation, eye liner, eye shadow, blusher

material a car is made from – rubber, metal, plastic, leather, foam, glass 

material for arts and crafts – canvas, paint, charcoal, clay, Playdoh, 

meat – bacon, mutton, beef, lamb, venison

men’s clothing - bomber jacket, shirt, tie, DJ, bowtie, double breasted jacket, 

men’s grooming product – shaving foam, aftershave, hair gel, Brylcream, shower gel, 
deodorant, anti-perspirant

metal – aluminium, stainless steel, copper, bronze, platinum, gold, cast iron, tin

mouth care product – floss, mouthwash, toothpaste, tooth polish, 

music – symphony, theme song, concerto, instrumental, 

pasta – fusilli, spaghetti, ravioli, farfalle, macaroni

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2012

plastic – cellophane, acrylic, vinyl, Bakelite

pollution – sewage, smoke, smog

powder – flour, cocaine, sugar, salt, pepper, washing powder

savoury  things  you  spread  on  bread  -  pâté,  sweet  pickle,  relish,  mango  chutney, 
French mustard, margarine, butter, Marmite/ Vegemite, Bovril

soft drink – pop, juice, squash

sport – football, cricket, crazy golf, American football, croquet, snooker, pool, 

sportswear – tracksuit, headband, sweatshirt, trainer,  

staff in a hotel – bellboy, doorman, chambermaid, barman,  

starchy food – brown rice, semolina, couscous, mashed potato, pasta, bread

stuff on the road – oil, snow, black ice, slush, mud

stuff  you  add  to  hot  drinks  –  (whipped)  cream,  sweetener,  sugar,  full  fat/  semi-
skimmed/ skimmed milk, alcohol, creamer

stuff you pull a length of – cling film, aluminium foil, toilet roll, kitchen roll, string, cotton 
thread, sellotape, masking tape, insulating tape

stuff you rub onto your skin – Vaseline, Vick’s, aftersun, suntan lotion,

supply for a photocopier – A4/ A3 (recycled) paper, toner, ink

thread – dental floss, string, rope, cotton, twine

time – millisecond, millennium, fortnight, long weekend, moment, tick, sec, era, gener-
ation

transport  –  minibus,  convertible/  cabriolet,  estate,  SUV,  Beemer,  Mercedes,  rubber 
dinghy, gondola, limousine, airport shuttle bus

weather – rain, hail, sleet, fog, smog, mist, sea spray

winter clothing – woolly scarf, jumper, fleece, mitten

women’s beauty product - body scrub, moisturiser, hand cream, hairspray

women’s clothing – nightdress, ballgown, bra, cheongsam, dress, top

Can you add any more things to the lists that match both by meaning and grammar?

Can you add any more lists to categories A and B above?

Test each other in pairs. Use your own ideas if you can. 

Do you think any of the things could actually be both countable and uncountable (= can be 
“some + noun” and “some + noun + s”, without the latter just meaning “some kinds of 
_____”)? How would that change the meaning?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2012

Words which are usually uncountable List dictation Answer key
All the lists are connected to uncountable nouns. Some are lists of kinds of nouns which 
are usually uncountable (e.g. “abstract nouns”), and others are general uncountable nouns 
that have countable examples (e.g. “luggage”). 

(A) Things that are usually 

uncountable

(B) Uncountable categories that have 

countable examples

abstract noun
alcohol
building material
condiment
dessert
detergent
drug
fabric/ cloth
fuel
gas
hair care product
ingredient for baking
ism
liquid in a car
liquid in the garage
liquid in the kitchen
make up
material a car is made from
material for arts and crafts
meat
metal
mouth care product
pasta
plastic
pollution
powder
savoury things you spread on bread
soft drink
sport
starchy food
stuff on the road
stuff you add to hot drinks
stuff you pull a length of
stuff you rub onto your skin
supply for a photocopier
thread
weather
women’s beauty product

accommodation
bedding
crockery
cutlery
footwear
fruit
furniture
jewellery
lighting
literature
luggage
men’s clothing
men’s grooming product
music
sportswear
staff in a hotel
time
transport
winter clothing
women’s clothing

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2012