Numbers- Differences

Level: Intermediate

Topic: Numbers

Grammar Topic: General

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (80 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Numbers What’s the difference?

All the pairs of numbers below are pronounced in different ways and/ or have  
different meanings. Can you identify and explain the difference each time?

10.000 and 10,000

1,000,000 and 1,000,000,000

1.12 as a number and 1.12 as dollars

911 (the emergency telephone number) and 9/11 (the World Trade Center 
attacks)

1600 (an engine size) and 1600 (the normal way of saying the number)

15-0 (a tennis score) and 15-0 (a very unlikely soccer score)

the short forms of 125 kilograms and 125 kilometres

5’ and 5’’

5/4/2010 written by a British person and 5/4/2010 written by an American 
person

0.5 in British English and 0.5 in American English

0.05 in British English and 0.05 in American English

1/4 and 1:4

90 minutes expressed as hours and 30 minutes expressed as hours

3

rd

 and 1/3

5

th

 and 1/5

4

th

 and 1/4

2/7 and 2 1/7

2/3 and 233/234

080 543 543 said by someone from the UK and the US

02 134 5892 and 021 345 892 

4322 1105 as a telephone number and a credit card number

090 22555 and 090 22255

4:45 and 5:15

4:55 and 5:05

04:45 and 16:45

16:10 and 16:11

The meaning of “Jump out of the first floor window” when a British person 
is speaking and when an American is speaking

the years 2006 and 1966

the years 1940 and 1904

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011

Numbers What’s the difference? Suggested answers

NB. Americans don’t say “and” in large numbers, so that word can usually be  
taken out in the examples below

10.000 and 10,000 – The first is a decimal point, and so it is ten or ten 
point oh oh oh/ ten point zero zero zero

1,000,000 and 1,000,000,000 – A million/ a billion (or a thousand 
million)

1.12 as a number and 1.12 as dollars – Decimals are always given as 
individual numbers, so the first is one point one two (not one point 
twelve). The second is one dollar twelve (cents).
  

911 (the emergency telephone number) and 9/11 (the World Trade Center 
attacks) – Nine one one/ Nine eleven (or September eleven)

1600 (an engine size) and 1600 (the normal way of saying the number) – 
Sixteen hundred and one thousand six hundred (although sixteen 
hundred is fairly common in American English)

15-0 (a tennis score) and 15-0 (a very unlikely soccer score) – Fifteen 
love/ fifteen nil (or fifteen zero in American English)

the short forms of 125 kilograms and 125 kilometres – One hundred and 
twenty five kilos (or kg)/ one hundred and twenty five k (or km). 
“Kilo” is common, but “k” is idiomatic and the others are rare. 

5’ and 5’’ – Five feet/ Five inches

5/4/2010 written by a British person and 5/4/2010 written by an American 
person – British people write and say it day/ month/ year, so it’s the 
fifth of April 2010. Americans write and say it month/ day/ year, so it’s 
May (the) four(th) 2010.
 

0.5 in British English and 0.5 in American English – British English 
speakers say “nought” for zero before a decimal point, so it’s nought 
point five. In American English it is zero point five

0.05 in British and American English – In the UK we usually say “oh” 
after a decimal point, so it’s nought point oh five/ zero point zero 
five. The British version is more difficult but makes it less vital to 
hear the word “point”

1/4 and 1:4 – A quarter (or a fourth)/ one in four

90 minutes expressed as hours and 30 minutes expressed as hours – An 
hour and a half/ Half an hour

3

rd

 and 1/3 – Third/ a third, so very similar

5

th

 and 1/5 – Fifth/ a fifth, so very similar

4

th

 and 1/4 – Fourth/ A quarter, so different (unlike most fractions)

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011

2/7 and 2 1/7 – Two sevenths/ Two and a seventh, so easy to get 
confused in you miss the “s” in the former or the “and” and “a” in 
the latter

2/3 and 233/234 – Complicated fractions just use “out of”, so it’s two 
thirds (or - rarely - two out of three)/ two hundred and thirty three out 
of two hundred and thirty four

080 543 543 said by someone from the UK and the US – The British 
tend to say “oh” in telephone numbers, so it’s oh eight oh five four 
three five four three/ zero eight zero five four three five four three

02 134 5892 and 021 345 892 – The gap means a pause, so the 
pauses come in different positions depending on what part of the 
telephone number the area code is.
 

4322 1105 as a telephone number and a credit card number – Telephone 
numbers can include “double”, so it is often four three double two 
double one oh five. Four three two two one one oh five could be a 
telephone number or other numbers such as a credit card, bank 
account, membership number or ID card

090 22555 and 090 22255 – You can also use the word “treble” in 
telephone numbers, although it is quite rare, so it could be oh nine 
oh double two treble five/ oh nine oh treble two double five 

4:45 and 5:15 – (A) quarter to five and (a) quarter past five

4:55 and 5:05 – Five to (or before) five and five past (or after) five

04:45 and 16:45 – The most common way is to say quarter to four in 
the morning/ quarter to four in the afternoon (or evening). Other 
possibilities include four forty five a.m./ four forty five p.m.

16:10 and 16:11 – With times that aren’t divisible by five, you must 
add the word “minutes” when telling the time the long way, so it’s 
ten past four in the afternoon/ eleven minutes past four in the 
afternoon. 

The meaning of “Jump out of the first floor window” when a British person 
is speaking and when an American is speaking - British buildings start 
on the ground floor and then go first, second, third etc. Therefore 
only the American one is at the level of the ground. The British 
person is therefore much more likely to injure or kill themselves!

2006 and 1966 – Years with two zeros in the middle tend to be 
pronounced like numbers, so it’s two thousand and six/ nineteen 
sixty six

1940 and 1904 – Saying “oh” with a year ending in a single digit 
makes it easier to hear the difference, so it is nineteen forty/ nineteen 
oh four

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011