Numbers- Social Issues Pairwork

Level: Intermediate

Topic: Numbers

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (120 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Social Issues- Numbers Trivia Pairwork Student A

Choose one of the numbers below and change it into a question, e.g. “What percentage 

of…?” or “How many…?” Give your partner hints such as “far higher” and “very slightly 

lower” until they get exactly the right answer.

Useful language
what fraction
how often
how long
when
in what year

far/ considerably/ slightly/ very slightly + higher/ lower

A commuter in Chiyoda ward, Tokyo spends 2.9 years travelling to and from work.

A half of American LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) adults say there 

is a lot of discrimination against LGBT people and nineteen percent say there is a 

lot of acceptance of them today.

A hundred and forty thousand people were killed and more than half a million 

homes were destroyed in the Great Kanto Earthquake of nineteen twenty three. 

A strike at Nissan in Japan in nineteen fifty three lasted half a year. 

A third of British eighteen to twenty four year olds receive parental help in paying 

their rent or mortgage (= housing loan). 

A third of high school students in Japan think school is fun. The worldwide average 

is fifty three percent. 

About sixteen hundred people are infected with HIV-AIDS in the world every day.

About twelve million Japanese people owe money to illegal loan sharks. 

Around half of British people consider themselves to belong to one particular reli-

gion. In nineteen eighty three, around two thirds of British people considered them-

selves to belong to one particular religion.

Eighteen point one seven percent of Japanese people work in manufacturing. Sev-

enteen point three six percent work in wholesale and retail. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Eighty six point six percent of Japanese people, ninety one point seven percent of 

Finnish people and seventy one point three percent of Chinese people consider 

themselves middle class. 

Every year in the USA tobacco kills about three hundred and ninety thousand peo-

ple, alcohol kills about eighty thousand people, passive smoking kills about fifty 

thousand people, cocaine kills about two thousand two hundred people, heroin kills 

about two thousand people, aspirin kills about two thousand people and marijuana 

kills none. 

Five hundred and fifteen million people are infected with malaria. 

Forty point seven percent of Japanese men and twenty two point nine percent of 

Japanese women go to university. 

Four thousand of the thirteen thousand buildings the Architectural Institute of Japan 

listed as historical monuments in nineteen eighty had been knocked down by two 

thousand and one. 

Greenpeace has half a million members in Germany and five thousand four hun-

dred members in Japan.

Half of UK adults regularly give to charity.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Social Issues- Numbers Trivia Pairwork Student B

Choose one of the numbers below and change it into a question, e.g. “What percentage 

of…?” or “How many…?” Give your partner hints such as “far higher” and “very slightly 

lower” until they get exactly the right answer.

Useful language
what fraction
how often
how long
when
in what year

far/ considerably/ slightly/ very slightly + higher/ lower

Health costs per person in nineteen ninety eight were four thousand and ninety four 

dollars in the USA, two thousand six hundred and forty four dollars in Switzerland, and 

two thousand three hundred and sixty five dollars in Germany (the top three in the 

world).

In January two thousand and two the Japanese newspaper Yomiuri Shimbun sold four-

teen million three hundred and twenty three thousand seven hundred and eighty one 

copies, a world record.  

In the USA, three-quarters of people who see a drug on TV and ask doctors for it are 

successful. 

In two thousand and five, JFE Steel was found to be putting up to seventy six times 

the legal limit of poisonous chemicals into Tokyo Bay.

In two thousand and three, two point five billion yen in cash was handed into the Tokyo

police. Seventy two percent was returned to its owners.

Japan is in a hundred and thirty fifth place in a list of a hundred and eighty one coun-

tries for the number of women in parliament.

Japan’s biggest yakuza mafia group the Yamaguchi-gumi crime syndicate has nine 

hundred gangsters working from fifty five offices in Tokyo. 

Japanese women are expected to have a life expectancy of ninety two point five years 

by the year twenty forty five.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

One fifth of British people trust government to put the nation's needs above those of a 

political party. In nineteen eighty six, thirty eight percent of British people trusted the 

government to put the nation’s needs above those of a political party.

One third of Japanese twelve year olds go to bed at midnight or later.

Only two hundred and ninety four of the eight hundred and twenty eight food additives 

accepted in Japan are accepted by the WHO (World Health Association).

The longest civil court case in the world took place in Japan when a professor sued 

the Ministry of Education over changes to one of his textbooks. The case lasted thirty 

two years.

The Oedo line in Tokyo cost one point four trillion yen to build (the most expensive un-

derground line in the world).

The Tokyo police receive three hundred thousand umbrellas a year.

There are thirty nine thousand love hotels in Japan. 

Two thirds of all Japanese students aged twelve to fifteen attend cram school.

Two thirds of Tokyo women have been groped on a train.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Extras

Suitable for use by the teacher in the presentation stage or for a third student in an odd 

numbered group. 

About twenty five percent of the average American’s daily calorie intake comes from 

sugar.

Eight three percent of British people think it is acceptable for a gay man or lesbian to 

teach in a school. In nineteen eighty three, forty one percent of British people thought 

it was acceptable for a gay man or lesbian to teach in a school.

Eighty two percent of British workers in "caring, leisure and other services", and sev-

enty seven percent of British administrative and secretarial workers are female.

Fifteen percent of the UK National Health Service budget is spent on treating diabetes.

Fifty five percent of the Japanese coastline is covered in concrete

Fifty one percent of British people think that benefits for unemployed people are "too 

high and discourage work".

Fifty three percent of British people believe the government has a responsibility to pro-

vide a decent standard of living for the unemployed. In nineteen eighty five, eighty one 

percent of British people thought the government had a responsibility to provide a de-

cent standard of living.

Forty five percent of British people think it is very important for Britain to continue to 

have a monarchy. 

Forty percent of the Japanese national budget is spent of construction. In the UK and 

France around five percent of the national budget is spent on construction.

In the famous “Recruit scandal” a hundred and fifty important people such as politi-

cians were found to have been accepting bribes from the Japanese company Recruit.

In the UK, alcohol abuse is linked to sixty five percent of suicide attempts, seventy six 

thousand facial injuries a year, thirty nine percent of fires and fifteen percent of drown-

ings.

Ninety nine percent of Japanese workers said they if they knew their company was do-

ing something illegal they wouldn’t tell anyone. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

The eating disorder anorexia afflicts about two percent of female Japanese high school

students, with roughly another ten percent at potential risk of developing it. Five point 

five percent were underweight when they were in their first year of high school, with 

the figure rising to thirteen point two percent by the time the girls reached their final 

year. 

The LDP ruled Japan for thirty eight unbroken years.

The US military thirty seven facilities in Japan’s Okinawa prefecture uses ten point four

percent of the land area and nineteen percent of the main island. 

There are approximately one point nine million foreign citizens in Japan. 

There are around one thousand two hundred and fifty koban police boxes in Tokyo.

There are four hundred thousand vending machines in Tokyo.

There is a seventy percent chance of a magnitude seven earthquake hitting Tokyo in 

the next thirty years.

Thirty four percent of Scottish thirteen year olds said they had been offered a drug and

thirteen percent said they had used a drug. 

Tokyo consumers come into contact with up to three thousand advertisements every-

day

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Pronounce the numbers another way
Try to think of or remember other ways of saying the underlined numbers. Put a question 
mark next to any you aren’t sure about. 

A strike at Nissan in Japan in nineteen fifty three lasted six months. 

Greenpeace has five hundred thousand members in Germany.

In two billion five hundred million yen in cash was handed into the Tokyo police. Sev-
enty two percent was returned to its owners.

Japanese women are expected to have a life expectancy of ninety two point five years 
by the year two thousand and forty five.

One thousand six hundred people are infected with HIV-AIDS in the world every day.

The Oedo line in Tokyo cost one trillion four hundred billion yen to build (the most ex-
pensive underground line in the world).

Pronounce the numbers
Try to think of or remember at least one way to say each of the numbers written as figures 
below. Put a question mark next to any you aren’t sure about. 
Dates and times

A hundred and forty thousand people were killed and more than half a million homes 
were destroyed in the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923. 

Four thousand of the thirteen thousand buildings the Architectural Institute of Japan 
listed as historical monuments in nineteen eighty had been knocked down by 2001. 

Large numbers

Only 294 of the 828 food additives accepted in Japan are accepted by the WHO.

There are 39,000 love hotels in Japan. 

Health costs per person in nineteen ninety eight were $4,094 in the USA, $2,644 in 
Switzerland, and $2,365 in Germany.

The Tokyo police receive 300,000 umbrellas a year.

Every year in the USA tobacco kills about 390,000 people. 

About 12,000,000 Japanese people owe money to illegal loan sharks. 

515,000,000 people are infected with malaria. 

In January two thousand and two the Japanese newspaper Yomiuri Shimbun sold 
14,323,781 copies, a world record.  

Decimals and fractions

A commuter in Chiyoda ward, Tokyo spends 2.9 years travelling to and from work.

86.6% of Japanese people, 91.7% of Finnish people and 71.3% of Chinese people 
consider themselves middle class. 

18.17% of Japanese people work in manufacturing. 17.36% work in wholesale and re-
tail. 

Around 1/2 of British people consider themselves to belong to one particular religion. 

1/3 of high school students in Japan think school is fun.

1/5 of British people trust government to put the nation's needs above those of a politi-
cal party. In nineteen eighty six, thirty eight percent of British people trusted the gov-
ernment to put the nation’s needs above those of a political party.

2/3 of Tokyo women have been groped on a train.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

In the USA, 3/4 of people who see a drug on TV and ask their doctors for it are suc-
cessful. 

Where can “and” go in the numbers above? Write “and” in as many places as you can. 

Compare your answers with the original worksheets, including where “and” can go. Start 
with any that you put question marks next to. The original sentences are in alphabetical 
order. 

What is the rule on using “and” with large numbers?

Are there any other ways of saying the numbers above? Try to find as many variations as 
possible. 

Try to say these other numbers:

1066 (year)
1902 (year)
0.23
0.05
1 1/2
1 4/5
1/100
23/24
31

st

30

th/

13

th

 

Homework
Choose three of the topics below and find several statistics for each, e.g. abortion in 
different places, at different times and/ or for different kinds of people. Next week you will 
explain the statistics without saying the topic and your partner will try to guess which of 
those things you are talking about. 
Suggested topics

Abortion

Affiliation with political parties/ Interest in politics/ Membership of political parties

Affordable housing

Age of retirement

Agriculture (e.g. as a percentage of GDP or percentage of the workforce)

Alcoholism/ Health problems due to alcohol

Allergies

Approval for a particular policy

Approval of a lifestyle choice/ Disapproval of a lifestyle choice

Bankruptcy

Belief in religion

Birth rate

Blue collar jobs

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Breakup of marriages (e.g. divorce and separation)

Bullying

Bureaucracy

Car ownership/ Households with two cars

Censorship

Children in care

Community activism

Control of the internet

Corruption (e.g. bribery and nepotism)

Cost of healthcare

Crime (e.g. serious crime, white collar crime, or petty crime like graffiti/ vandalism)

Data protection problems

Day labourers

Deaths from alcohol

Discrimination (e.g. sexism, racism or ageism)

Domestic violence

Donation of blood and organs/ Shortage of blood and organs

Downsizing/ Restructuring

Drinking and driving

Drugs (e.g. hard drugs, soft drugs or prescription drugs such as anti-depressants)

Eating disorders (e.g. anorexia/ bulimia)

Economic inequality/ Income differences between the rich and poor/ The income gap

Educational standards (e.g. positions on international educational rankings)

Effects of inflation/ Effects of deflation

Emigration

Entrepreneurism

Exports

Fast food/ Pre-prepared food

Fear of crime

Female employment rates/ The proportion of women at work/ The proportion of 
mothers who work/ Women in work  (including women in senior/ political positions)

Gambling

Giving to charities

Homelessness

House sales

Household debt/ Personal debt

Household income/ Income of households

Human trafficking

Immigration

Imports

Industrial decline

Influence of the financial sector

Influence of the technology sector

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Interest in traditional arts and crafts

Internet addiction

Job instability/ Job mobility/ Job stability

Lack of health insurance

Leaving the family home later/ Shared households (= multigenerational households, 
called “parasite singles” in Japan)

Lifestyle diseases

Local tax/ Local spending

Long term unemployment

M&A (= mergers and acquisitions, meaning takeovers)

Mental illness

Meritocracy (e.g. performance-based pay or the end of promotion due to seniority)

Minorities in work (e.g. in senior positions)

Missing children/ Runaway children

Multilingual classrooms

Number of elderly

Obesity

Old people’s homes

Organised crime (e.g. mafia and gangs)

Outsourcing

People dropping out of the workforce (e.g. NEETs or people on disability benefits)

Political activism (e.g. protests/ demonstrations, petitions)

Political extremism

Pornography/ The sex industry

Position of the middle class/ Size of the middle class

Poverty (e.g. the Working Poor or people living under the poverty line)

Pre-school education 

Pressure on children to succeed

Property prices/ Rents

Recidivism (= Reoffending)/ People released from prison not being able to fit back in to
society

Respect for elders/ teachers/ parents/ fathers

School absenteeism

School violence

Self-harm

Sexual harassment (e.g. groping on trains)

Single member households

Stress-related illnesses

Smoking/ Health problems due to smoking (including second hand smoke)

Social entrepreneurism

Social isolation

Social liberalism

Social mobility

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Social welfare

Studying abroad

Suicide

Support for monarchy

The lifestyle of “Millennials” (adults ages 18 to 32)

The superrich (e.g. Internet billionaires)

The underclass

Trust in public institutions (banking, civil service, health service, teachers, the press 
and other media, the monarchy, government, political parties, politicians, etc)

Union membership/ Union action (strikes etc)

University entrance

Unmarried mothers/ Single parent families

White collar jobs

Youth violence

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014