Olympics- Statistics Pairwork Guessing Game

Level: Intermediate

Topic: Sport

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (110 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Olympics Statistics Pairwork Guessing Game Student A
Choose one of the facts below and turn it into a question, e.g. “How many tonnes of steel 
tubing recycled from old gas pipes were used in the roof of the Olympic Stadium?” If there 
is more than one number in the sentence, just choose one and make a sentence out of it. 
After your partner guesses, give them hints until they reach exactly the right answer.

Useful language
“The real number is 

much much much  

higher/ older/ more”

much much

           lower/ fewer/ less/ younger”

much
quite a lot
a little/ a bit/ a little bit
a tiny bit

1.

Two  thousand  five  hundred  tonnes  of  steel  tubing  recycled  from  old  gas  pipes  was 
used in the roof of the London Olympic Stadium.

2.

A hundred and sixty thousand tonnes of soil was dug up to be able to build the London 
Aquatics Centre.

3. Twenty thousand people will be based at the London Olympics International Broadcast 

Centre.

4.

Thirteen  countries  participated  in  the  first  modern  Olympic  Games  in  eighteen  ninety 
six  (Australia,  Austria,  Bulgaria,  Chile,  Denmark,  France,  the  UK,  Germany,  Greece, 
Hungary, Switzerland, Sweden and the US).

5.

Only four countries have participated in every modern Olympic Games since eighteen 
ninety six (Australia, France, Great Britain and Greece).

6.

Three sports  have  appeared  in  every  modern Olympic Games  (athletics,  fencing and 
swimming).

7.

Gymnast Larisa Latynina won eighteen medals (over three Olympics).

8.

Eighty six nations have never won any Olympic medals.

9.

Four  athletes  have  won  medals  in  both  the  Winter  Olympic  Games  and  the  Summer 
Olympic Games.

10.

No women competed in the first modern Olympics in eighteen ninety six.

11. The oldest medallist was seventy two years, two hundred and eighty one days old (he 

won a silver medal in shooting).

12.The youngest medallist was twelve (she won a bronze medal in the two hundred metre 

breaststroke in nineteen thirty six).

13.The London games include ten thousand five hundred athletes from two hundred and 

five nations and four thousand Paralympic athletes from a hundred and sixty five na-
tions.

14.

There are three hundred and two Olympic events in London.

15.The carrying of the flame in the UK includes eight thousand people.

16.

There are thirty two London Olympics sports venues with a capacity of seven hundred 
thousand people.

17.

The main Olympic stadium in London has five hundred and thirty two floodlights.

18.

The London Aquatics Centre has more than eight hundred thousand tiles.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2012

Olympics Statistics Pairwork Guessing Game Student B
Choose one of the facts below and turn it into a question, e.g. “How many tickets are for 
sale for the London Olympics?” If there is more than one number in the sentence, just 
choose one and make a sentence out of it. After your partner guesses, give them hints 
until they reach exactly the right answer.

Useful language
“The real number is 

much much much

     higher/ older/ more”

much much

           lower/ fewer/ less/ younger”

much
quite a lot
a little/ a bit/ a little bit
a tiny bit

19.

There are nine point six million tickets for sale for the London Olympics.

20.

The temperature in the Olympic swimming pool must be twenty seven degrees Celsius.

21.

There is only one sport in which men and women compete with each other on equal 
terms (equestrianism).

22.

Over two hundred buildings were knocked down to make room for the Olympic site in 
London.

23.

Ninety eight percent of waste from construction for the London Olympics was reused, 
recycled or recovered.

24.

The Olympics will cost London taxpayers six hundred and twenty five million pounds.

25.

Four billion people are expected to watch the London Olympics opening ceremony (on 
the twenty seventh of July two thousand and twelve).

26.

The  total  workforce  for  the  London  Games  is  two  hundred  thousand  (volunteers  and 
paid workers). 

27.

The London twenty twelve Olympic gold medal is made up of ninety two point five per-
cent silver and only one point three four percent gold (the rest is copper). 

28.

The  bronze  medal  is  made  from  ninety  seven  percent  copper,  two  point  five  percent 
zinc and nought point five percent tin.

29.

One million pieces of sports equipment will be used during the London Games (includ-
ing practice equipment). 

30.The London Games has a hundred and thirteen sponsors. 
31.Twelve million meals will be served during the London games (including to spectators).
32.There will be a thousand magnetometer search arches (similar to airport metal detect-

ors) at the London Games. 

33.The very first Olympics took place in seven hundred and seventy six BC and had one 

event.

34.It took the Montreal government more than thirty years to pay for the nineteen seventy 

six games.

35.Sixty percent of visitors to the Sydney Games in the year two thousand said they would 

definitely or probably revisit Sydney in the next three years.

36.

Sixty eight percent of the UK population wanted the Olympics to come to Britain.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2012

Without looking back at the text yet, try to remember how the following numbers are pro-
nounced.
2,500 t
160,000 t
20,000
1896 (year)
10,500
205
4,200
165
700,000
9,600,000
98%
£625m.
4,000,000,000
2012
27/7/2012
1.34%
0.5%
113
12,000,000
1,000
776 BC
1976 (year)
2000 (year)

Compare with the text. (The numbers are in the same order as the text). 

Are there any other ways of saying those numbers?

What is the rule about using “and” in large numbers in British English?

Swap texts and test each other again, this time paying more attention to how you 
pronounce the numbers. 

Discuss some of these topics, using the statistics from before to support your position if 
you like.

Ecological impact of the Olympics.

Impact of the Olympics on local people. 

Commercialisation of the Olympics (e.g. sponsorship).

Security problems at the Olympics. 

National and local government spending on sport.

The size of the Olympics.

Hosting the Olympics in this city

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2012