Parks- Vocabulary and Speaking

Level: Advanced

Topic: Nature

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (150 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Parks- Vocabulary and Speaking

Brainstorm vocabulary into the categories below. Some words and expressions can go in 
more than one category.

Actions that people do in parks

Adjectives for describing parks 

Animals in parks and things connected to them 

Architectural features of parks 

Decorations/ Ornaments 

Negative words connected to parks 

Park furniture 

Parts of parks 

Plants and parts of plants 

Positive words connected to parks 

Things connected to sport/ exercise 

Things connected to water 

Things for children

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Suggested answers

Actions that people do in parks- mow, weed, do sports, have a picnic, have a barbe-
cue, relax, keep fit, do taichi, jog, walk the dog, hang out, feed the ducks, feed the 
birds, look at the flowers, have a nap, pick up rubbish, have walk/ stroll, have lunch, 
water, prune, do yoga, exercise/ work out

Adjectives for describing parks - big/ large/ huge, compact/ small, local, romantic, 
green, neglected/ shabby/ rundown, neat, fun, traditional, 

Animals in parks and things connected to them - pigeon, squirrel, crow, magpie, 
nest, duck, turtle, fish (e.g. koi), tadpole/ frog, sparrow, feed, 

Architectural features of parks - hill/ mound, pond/ lake, wall/ fence, fountain, path, 
car park, gate, greenhouse, shed, 

Decorations/ Ornaments - statue/ sculpture, topiary (= ornamental hedge), trellis, 

Negative words connected to parks - dog’s mess, rubbish, overgrown, neglected, 
gloomy, mosquito-infested, damp, messy, mud/ muddy, dust/ dusty, vandalised/ van-
dalism, graffiti, 

Park furniture - bench, deckchair, parasol/ garden umbrella, patio table, sun lounger

Parts of parks - smoking area, playground, lawn, nets, tennis courts, (outdoor) pool, 
border, flowerbed, lawn, nursery, arbour, running track

Plants and parts of plants - aromatic plant (lavender etc), blossom, branch, bulb, 
bush/ hedge, cactus, climbing rose, flower, fruit tree, grass, herb (rosemary, basil, etc), 
leaf, moss, petal, pollen, root, seed, stem, stick, thorn, trunk, twig, weed, wild flower, 

Positive words connected to parks - aromatic/ scent, child friendly, ecologically 
friendly, green, leafy, fun, relaxing, romantic, traditional, 

Things connected to sport/ exercise – running track, (outdoor) swimming pool, par-
allel bars, chin up bar, sit up bench, tennis courts, 

Things connected to water - fountain, tap, hose, paddling pool, pond/ lake, sprinkler, 
stream, (outdoor) swimming pool, water barrel/ water tub, waterfall, watering can, 
drinking fountain, rowing boat, pedalo

Things for children- basketball court/ hoop, climbing frame, paddling pool, sandpit, 
slide, swimming pool, swing, roundabout, seesaw

Can you think of ways of improving these things?
-

climbing frame/ jungle gym

-

outdoor swimming pool

-

paddling pool

-

park bench

-

park bins

-

park fence

-

park gate

-

park security

-

pedalo

-

rowing boat

-

slide

-

tennis courts

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Parks roleplay debates
Argue over who should be allowed to take control of the park, for example:
-

A construction company who will build a mixed-use development with a park included

-

A local residents’ association

-

A school (mainly to be used as a school playground and opened to the public at other 
times)

-

A small local charity

-

A large national charity

-

A local religious organisation

-

A gardening society (to convert part to allotments and keep the rest open to the public)

-

A garden centre (to use half to show their plants to anyone who wants to come in and 
the other half to sell them)

Can you find a compromise solution?

Debate the use of a brownfield site, e.g.
-

Nature reserve

-

Park

-

Mixed use

-

School facilities

Can you find a compromise solution?

What do you think of these park ideas?
Choose one thing below that you are particularly in favour of or against and explain why. 
Your partner must take the opposite point of view.

a park designed to attract wildlife

a park which is mainly cactuses

a sculpture park

a security guard on the gate

a wall for graffiti

an area for nudists

banning persistent offenders

barbed wire on top of the fences

forcing all large developments to have a public park

forcing  publically-funded  organisations  like  universities,  the  royal  family  and  mu-
seums to open their gardens to the public

leaving the whole or part of the park to go wild

locking the park at five o’clock

more use of wild plants

ornamental hedges (= topiary)

paying a refundable deposit

piped music

questioning and/ or searching of suspicious looking people

replacing some of the grass

security cameras

sprinklers that come on once an hour to periodically clear the lawns

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Solutions to park funding problems

What do you think of these ideas to raise enough money to support a park or cut down on 
costs? Which is the best/ least bad idea below? Can you think of any better ideas? 

A small zoo, e.g. a petting zoo

A son-et-lumiere show

A tax on local residents, e.g. people who live within one mile of the park

A tent/ pavilion to be hired out for events

Advertise, e.g. advertising jingles in the piped music

Allow a private tennis club to use the courts as long as they provide some classes for 
poor local kids

Allow film crews etc to take over the park for fixed amounts of time

An exclusive area, e.g. an island in the middle of the park, for private functions

Arrange classes that you charge for, e.g. aerobics or nature photography

Better quality facilities, e.g. an exclusive sunbathing area and cleaner toilets, for those 
who pay or have a season ticket

Build a car park and charging for its use

Build something, e.g. a car park, underground under the park

Change part of the lawn into an area for ball sports and charging for its use

Change part of the park into a private facility, e.g. club, and use that as a way of finan-
cing the rest

Change part of the park to allotments

Change the park to a charity and do sponsored runs etc to raise money

Charge a small amount of money for using the park

Charge buskers and other street performers for permission to perform in the park

Charge companies to set up large tents for corporate entertaining

Charge for toilet paper and soap

Charge for use of deckchairs

Charge for use of the toilets

Charge more for the sports facilities

Charge people for selling in the park, e.g. a hotdog stall or ice cream stand

Children maintaining the park as school work or as a punishment for misbehaviour at 
school

Commission  a  private  company  to  run  the  park  for  less  money  and  let  them  raise 
money however they like short of charging for admission

Convert (part of) it into a botanical gardens

Cut spending on other things and so continue full government funding at the present or 
higher levels

Festivals, e.g. music festivals, with a charge for admittance

Filling in the pond

Fines for misbehaviour

Give the park to local residents to do what they like with, cutting most or all funding

Grow plants to sell

Have Xmas illuminations and charge for admission during that period

Large deposits for using park facilities which are lost if there is any misuse or damage 
at all

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Leave the tennis courts open and make organisations/ people bring their own equip-
ment, including nets

Let the pond go wild

Make the pool more exclusive and expensive, making it more like a hotel pool

Not picking up fallen leaves

Outdoor market with charges for admission and/ or for setting up a stall there

Reduce how often the grass is cut

Reduce how often the park is weeded

Remove lighting and close at dusk

Replace the gardeners with people doing community service

Sell food and drink and banning people bringing those things in from elsewhere

Sell food for the ducks and koi

Sell off the sculpture (to raise money and reduce the costs of security and insurance)

Sell souvenirs

Sell the courts to a private tennis club

Sell the land and build another park on the roof of the new building

Sell the land and build another park somewhere else, on a cheap brownfield site

Set up a café or restaurant inside the park

Set up a facility for weddings

Shorten the hours of the park, e.g. closing one day a week 

Sponsorship,  e.g.  changing  the  name  of  the  park  to  the  name  of  the  sponsor  (e.g. 
“IBM Hyde Park”) or allowing sponsors to advertise their association with the park (e.g. 
“Microsoft, proud sponsors of Central Park”)

Stop heating the pool water

Use exclusively for local residents, who must help with the gardening etc

Vending machines

Speak in favour of one of the things above. Your partner will take the opposite side of the 
argument. Talk about how desirable or undesirable it would be, how much financial impact 
it would have, what people’s reactions might be, if it would actually work, etc.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Solve the park problems

Choose one of the problems below and suggest at least one solution. Your partner will ask 
you questions about your idea. 

A new patch of land for a park is very long and thin

A new tall building nearby will mean that everything people do in the park will be visible 
for the first time

Balls flying out of the park

Balls ruining flowers etc

Can’t afford someone to supervise the tennis courts and take money

Children falling off park equipment and hurting themselves

Children rarely go to parks anymore

Children running across the street

Children walking on the flowerbeds

Complaints from neighbours about noise

Complaints from neighbours about parking nearby

Conflicts  between  people  playing  sports  on  the  lawn  and  people  doing  less  active 
things, e.g. picnics and sunbathing

Crime, e.g. pickpocketing

Crows attacking people

Cruising

Deer attacking people

Difficult to get to/ Limited public transport

Dogs digging up the flowerbeds

Dogs’ mess

Drug dealing

Drunkenness

Dust

Graffiti

Heavy petting by young couples

Homeless people setting up shelters in the park

It gets too busy

Little greenery in the park and little money to add any

Little rain/ Dry soil

Loud parties after dark

Men hassling women

Mosquitoes

Mud

Old ladies taking cuttings of plants or even entire plants

People climbing over the fence after the park closes

People feeding cats and pigeons and so attracting them to the park

People feeding fish/ ducks too much or with unsuitable things

People jumping into the lake

People picking flowers

People sleeping in the park

People sleeping on benches

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

People staking out large areas for picnics long before they use them

People taking up benches for long periods of time

People throwing rubbish in the water

Pigeons’ mess

Problems keeping lawns in good condition

Rollerskaters/ Skateboarders (nearly) colliding with pedestrians

Rotting fruit from trees

Rubbish

Rusty playground equipment

Soap and toilet paper being stolen from toilets

Street trading

Teenagers using the playground

The land that the park is on has become very valuable for the first time and so the loc-
al council would like to sell it

The local weather is very bad

The park isn’t wheelchair accessible

There is little sunlight, e.g. because the park is surrounded by tall buildings

Tree roots cracking the paths

Trees in the park are starting to block sunlight from houses opposite

Unused playground equipment

Using too much water

Vandalism

Walking on the lawn

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Design a park for particular purposes
Perhaps after choosing which are the most important and/ or needed, discuss how to 
design a park for uses from the list below.

Appreciating the changing seasons

Approaching people in the park, e.g. surveying them or to tell them about your religion

Being around other people/ Relieving loneliness

Bringing in your own food and drink, e.g. e.g. picnics, lunch break or barbecues

Buying and eating food and drink, e.g. at café tables

Buying and selling

Camping

Clearing your head

Climbing trees

Collecting natural things, e.g. autumn leaves, wild fruit/ nuts, bugs/ tadpoles

Cycling

Displaying art

Drinking (= alcohol)

Enjoying animals, e.g. bird watching or feeding animals

Escaping the city/ Escaping the noise/ Escaping the traffic

Escaping the heat

Fishing

Flying kites

Fresh air

Fun/ Excitement

Gardening ideas

Giving classes

Having a coffee

Helping with gardening

Learning about local history

Listening to music

Looking at plants, e.g. autumn leaves, blossom or flowers

Looking down at the surrounding area

Making money, e.g. selling or doing balloon art

Painting/ Sketching

Peace and quiet

People-watching

Performing, e.g. busking, doing magic

Playing children’s games, e.g. hide and seek or tag

Playing with snow, e.g. snowball fights or ice sculpture

Political speeches, e.g. like Speakers’ Corner

Practising music

Religious meetings/ Preaching

Romance

Setting off fireworks

Shelter when there is a disaster, e.g. an earthquake

Sleeping, e.g. having a siesta

Smoking

Socialising, e.g. meeting friends and family or meeting strangers

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Spending all day sitting on a bench

Sports/ Exercise/ Keep fit, e.g. jogging, inline skating, skateboarding, Frisbee, speed 
walking, aerobics, tennis, football, rugby, volleyball, golf/ pitch and putt/ crazy golf, ice 
skating, horse ridingbaseball, softball, badminton, working out, rock climbing, swim-
ming, martial arts, weight training, ice skating, bowls – including formal and informal 
competitive sports

Stress relief

Study

Sunbathing/ Enjoying the sun, e.g. bringing in a deckchair

Tai chi/ Yoga/ Meditation

Taking a pet for a walk

Taking cuttings from plants

Taking photos

Using the toilets

Walking on grass

Walking through to get somewhere else

Water play, e.g. splashing in fountains, water fights or paddling

Wild children’s play, e.g. playing in mud or fighting with sticks

Draw that park and then present it to the class. They will give you feedback on its suitabil-
ity for those uses and more generally how good a park it would be. 

Are there any purposes above which you wouldn’t want the park to be suitable for or care 
about catering to? Are there any you would want to ban or discourage from in the park?

Rank the ones in italics by how likely you would be to ban them.

What would be suitable punishments?

Write out rules for your park. 

Design an information board with the rules on.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Designing a park for groups of people
Perhaps after choosing which are the most important and/ or needed, discuss how to 
design a park for groups of people from the list below.

Art lovers

Blind people

Children, including young children who can’t yet properly do what the park is designed 
for, e.g. use a swing on their own, climb a climbing frame or walk

Clubs

Families

Homeless people

Large groups

People who need persuading to go to parks/ spend time outside, e.g. teenagers who 
like technology

People with hay fever

People with pets

Physically disabled people

Smokers

Sunbathers

The elderly

Tourists/ People from outside the area

University students

Draw that park and then present it to the class. They will give you feedback on its suitabil-
ity for those groups of people and more generally how good a park it would be. 

Are there any groups of people above who you wouldn’t want the park to be suitable for or 
care about catering to? Are there any you would want to ban or discourage from using the 
park?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Design a park taking particular things into account
Perhaps after choosing which are the most important and/ or needed, discuss how to 
design a park taking the number of things below which your teacher tells you into account. 

Appearance, e.g. screening areas which are unattractive

Cleanliness and tidiness, e.g. bins

Elements that fit well together and with the local area

Focal point(s)

Food and drink

Funding

Getting local people involved

Getting positive media coverage

Giving people pride in their local area/ Making people interested in their local area

Improving the image of the area with people elsewhere, including perhaps attracting 
people to visit or move there

Information, e.g. signs/ maps/ information boards and/ or pamphlets/ leaflets

Maintenance, e.g. access for maintenance vehicles

Making people come back more often, e.g. with the seasons or with special events

Making people spend longer in park

Neighbouring houses, including local property values

Noise

Outdoor stages/ amphitheatres

Pamphlets/ Leaflets?

Parking, including bike racks, motorcycle parking and disabled parking, in the park 
and/ or in the local area

Pets, e.g. dog’s mess

Safety, e.g. making sure there are no areas which are too isolated/ hidden from view, 
emergency vehicle access

Seating

Smells

Something to make the park stand out

Staffing

Teaching people about history

Teaching people about nature/ green issues

The local economy

Use at night, e.g. lighting

Use on cold days

Use on hot days, e.g. shade and drinking fountains

Use on/ after rainy weather

Views

Water play for children

Wheelchair access

Wild animals

Draw that park and then present it to the class. They will give you feedback on how well it 
matches your criteria, if those were the right criteria, and more generally how good a park 
it would be. 

Are there any criteria above which are completely unimportant? Rank all the others. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013