Politeness in making arrangements and future tenses review

Level: Intermediate

Topic: Time

Grammar Topic: Future Forms

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (90 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Politeness in making arrangements and future tenses review

Choose the most formal/ polite option in each group of phrases below and put a tick next 
to it. You can also put crosses next to the less polite forms if you like. 

Vocabulary
… if that is convenient with you. 
… if that’s OK with you.

… if you are available.
… if you’re free. 

That’s okay.
That’s perfect.
That would be absolutely perfect, thanks.

Modal verbs
Could you make it then?
Can you make it then?

Grammar – future tenses/ future forms
I want to meet you next week.
I’d like to meet you next week.
I need to meet you next week.

I’m sorry, I might meet my boss at that time.
I’m sorry, I’m meeting my boss at that time.
I’m sorry, I’m going to make an appointment to meet my boss at that time.
I’m sorry, I will probably meet my boss at that time.

I would have loved to, but unfortunately the last bus leaves at 9 pm.
I would have loved to, but unfortunately I’m going to drive home at about 6 pm.

I’ve got another appointment, but I’m going to change it anyway.
I’ve got another appointment, but I’ll change it to another time so I can meet you then. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

Find examples of the things described below in the grammar section above and use them 
to check your ticks and crosses above. Skip if you get stuck, as the one below might help 
with it. 

This is a more polite way of asking to meet someone because it’s a normal or more 

formal way to talk about desires and request.

This is not such a polite way of asking because it’s a very casual way to talk about 

desires and requests. 

This is a more polite way of saying no because it is a scheduled timetabled event that

I can’t change (and perhaps nobody can change) and so sounds like it can’t be 

moved.

It’s a more polite way of saying yes because it shows that you have made a 

spontaneous decision while you are speaking to do something to help them 

(meaning you hadn’t planned to do that before speaking to them).

It’s not such as polite way of saying yes, because it means that your plan was already 

to cancel the other event anyway and so you aren’t making a special effort to meet that

person.  

This is a more polite way of saying no because it sounds like the other event has 

already been arranged and so it seems very fixed and difficult or impossible to 

change. 

This is not such a polite way of saying no because it seems that the other event is just 

my plan that I have decided (and so should be something that I could just change my 

mind about)

This is not a polite way of saying no because it’s just a prediction (= my imagination 

of the future) and so it isn’t a good enough reason not to meet someone.

This is a very impolite way of saying no because it sounds like a very unsure 

prediction and so it is a terrible reason for not meeting someone. 

Write these key words from the statements above next to the phrases on the last page. If 

they are written with “x 2”, that means there is more than one form with that function on 

the last page.  

arrangement (= something already fixed with another person)

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015

desire x 2

plan

prediction x 2 (= imagination of the future)

spontaneous decision (= instant decision made while you are speaking)

timetabled event 

Match these forms to the descriptions above. 

am/ is/ are + v + ing

be going to

might

want

will

would like

Present Simple (go/ goes, do/ does, etc)

Check your answers as a class. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2015