Prepositions of Time- Pairwork Guessing Game

A LESSON PLAN FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHERS

Level: Intermediate
Topic: Time
Grammar Topic: Prepositions
Type: Lesson Plans
Submitted by:
Published: 25th Feb 2020

Below is a preview of the 'Prepositions of Time- Pairwork Guessing Game' lesson plan and is automatically generated from the PDF file. While it will look close to the original, there may be formatting differences. It's provided to allow you to view the content of the lesson plan before you download the file.

      Page: /

Lesson Plan Text

Prepositions of Time- Pairwork Guessing Game
with useful phrases for telephoning, meetings and emails

Choose one of the sections below and read out one example sentence with the word in 
bold missing. Your partner can guess just once what the missing word is. If they are 
wrong, read out another example from the same section with the same missing word. 
Continue until they guess the right word, with only one guess per hint. Your partner must 
guess exactly the word there, even if other words are correct in the gap(s). If you run out of
sentences before your partner guesses the answer, please make up your own example 
sentences with the same missing word until your partner is correct. 

When your partner guesses correctly, read out the ones they got wrong with the missing 
word in to help them remember, then switch roles and guess the missing word from your 
partner’s sentences. 

Ask about any sentences you don’t understand, other words which you think could also go 
in the gaps, meanings of and differences between the prepositions, etc. 

Swap worksheets with your partner and play the same game, making sure you start with 
the most difficult sections and most difficult examples (as they have seen those sentences 
before). 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2020

p. 1

Prepositions of Time- Pairwork Guessing Game 
Student A

Useful phrases for doing the activity
“I’m sorry, can you say that again (a little more slowly)?”
“Sorry, did you say…. or…?”
“Can you repeat the first part/ middle part/ last part?”
“I guess the missing word is…”
“I’m not sure. Can you give me another hint/ another example?”

“That’s right. Well done. It’s your turn to read one out”
“I think that is also correct, but that’s not the word I’ve got here. Another one from the 
same section is…” 
“That’s close, but not quite what I’ve got here. Here’s one more with the same missing 
word…”
“No, that’s not possible because… I’ll give you another example…”
“Sorry, you’re only allowed to guess once per hint. I’ll read out another one”

after
 Are you available the day after tomorrow?
 My meeting finishes at five p.m, so we can go out for a drink after that, if you like.
 Do you have to go straight back to your office after this (meeting)?
 We forecast that income will creep up next year and accelerate the year after next. 
 If you can’t make it next week, how about the week after next?
 Can you give me a hand with the presentation the day after tomorrow?

at
 If you have any further questions, please feel free to phone again at any time. 
 What are you working on at the moment?
 So, you must tell me more about that later, but I have another meeting at midday, so 

we should probably get started, if that is okay. 

 Unfortunately I will be travelling to Libya at just that time. How about later in the week?
 I really like your office. It looks lively around here. Is there much to do at night?

by
 Could you let me know by close of business on Friday?
 I’ll make sure I’m at the airport by the time you arrive, so I’ll meet you in arrivals.
 Well, I’d love to chat more, but we have to leave this room by eleven thirty (at the 

latest), so let’s get down to business, shall we?

 I’m afraid I haven’t made much progress, but I should finish by the end of next week.
 As you can see from this line graph, we expect to double our market share by (the end

of) 2025. 

in
 I’m sorry but I’m busy all morning. Do you have any time in the afternoon?
 We’re considering having a press conference in three days’ time. Can you come?
 I hope we have the chance to do business again in the near future. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2020

p. 2

 We had a few blips in the recent past, but demand has stabilised recently. 
 Anyway, I have another meeting  in  10 minutes, so we’ll have to stop there, if that’s

okay.

 Anyway, I’m phoning about the meeting in April.

on
 See you on Monday.
 I’m afraid the office is closed on Independence Day. How about the day after that?
 Are you free to meet on Friday afternoon?
 Everything will be closed on Christmas Day, so make sure you buy food by Xmas Eve.
 The AGM will be on the thirteenth of January, so can you get the PowerPoint ready be-

fore that?

 Thanks for coming all this way on such a cold day.
 I’d like to meet on Monday the nineteenth of April, if that is convenient with you. 
 I’m writing about our meeting on Monday.

until
 I recommend the restaurant on the second floor of your hotel. It’s very reasonable and 

it’s open until eleven p.m. every day.

 Anyway, we only have this room until two, so shall we make a start, if you don’t mind?
 I don’t think we can finish it but I’ll continue working on it until the thirty first. 

within 
 We expect sales to fully bounce back within the next quarter. 
 Sorry for the delay. I’ll do it as soon as I can, and definitely within two days. 

(nothing)
 I’m sorry, I’m busy – tomorrow. How about the day after tomorrow?
 I finished it – this morning. Do you have another project for me?
 That’s fine. Speak to you – later, then. 
 Do you fancy coming to our Xmas party – tonight?
 Are you doing anything – tonight?
 That a pity. We’ll definitely let you know sooner – next time.
 Thank you for your email – yesterday.
 We   don’t   seem   to   be   getting   anywhere.   Let’s   sleep   on   this   and   try   again   –   next

Monday.

 Okay, I’ll pass your message onto him. I’m sure he will get back to you – soon.
 No, that’s okay, thanks. I’ll just call again – later. Thanks for your help. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2020

p. 3

Prepositions of Time- Pairwork Guessing Game 
Student B

Useful phrases for doing the activity
“I’m sorry, can you say that again (a little more slowly)?”
“Sorry, did you say…. or…?”
“Can you repeat the first part/ middle part/ last part?”
“I guess the missing word is…”
“I’m not sure. Can you give me another hint/ another example?”

“That’s right. Well done. It’s your turn to read one out”
“I think that is also correct, but that’s not the word I’ve got here. Another one from the 
same section is…” 
“That’s close, but not quite what I’ve got here. Here’s one more with the same missing 
word…”
“No, that’s not possible because… I’ll give you another example…”
“Sorry, you’re only allowed to guess once per hint. I’ll read out another one”

ago
 It’s a lovely area. I was last here ten years ago, but it hasn’t really changed. 
 I’m sorry, he left the office just a few minutes ago. Do you have his mobile number?
 Sales plateaued a few years ago, but have stayed quite stable since then, with no big 

dips. 

 Thank you very much for your email two days ago
 Harry? It’s Alex. Graham introduced us two weeks ago

at
 I’m afraid she’s in a meeting at the moment. Would you like to leave a message?
 My plane lands at a quarter to six in the morning, so can we meet an hour after that?
 That’s fine, but my next meeting starts at a quarter past three, so I’ll need to finish be-

fore then. 

 We’ll discuss that at the end of the quarter, then I’ll let you know what we decide. 
 I’ll be happy to answer any questions at the end of the presentation. 

before
 Did you see the (big/ Man U and Man City) match the day before yesterday?
 I don’t know if you remember me, but we met here the year before last. 
 How are you getting on with the project you were given the month before last?
 We still have five minutes left, so is there any other business before we bring the 

meeting to a close?

 That sounds perfect, but I just need to check with my boss before I can sign. 

for
 Can I borrow your dictionary for a few minutes?
 I’m going to York for a few days, so can we meet at the end of next week?
 Actually, we’ve known each other for years. It’s great to see you again, Jules.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2020

p. 4

 I’m here in Osaka for the next four days. Is there anything I should do while I’m here?
 I’m only here for three days. What sightseeing spots do you most recommend?

in
 I’ll check with my boss and get back to you in the next two days.
 Okay, see you in a few minutes, then. 
 I’m just about to get on the train, so can you call again in about an hour when I get off?
 I’ll send you an update in April, probably on the 15

th

.

 We’re planning to launch the new product in winter 2021, and we predict that income 

will rocket straightaway.  

 My firm was founded in Birmingham in 1789 but it only grew slowly for the first century.

since
 There was a little dip in profits two years ago, but profits have recovered since then. 
 Long time no see! I’ve haven’t seen you since the last trade fair. How have you been?
 Long time no see. How have you been since we last met?
 I am sorry it has been so long since my last email. 

yet
 I’m afraid I haven’t finished the report yet. Can we extend the time limit by two days?
 Have they delivered the raw materials yet?

(nothing)
 Would you like to join us for dinner – this evening?
 Do you have many more meetings – today?
 I look forward to meeting you – next week. 
 I met your colleague Joao Fern – last year. Does he still work in your department?
 Are you doing anything special – this weekend?
 Have you been busy – this week?
 Great. You won’t regret it. I’ll email you a map – later (today).
 Thanks for your email – this morning.
 I’m sorry but she’s out of the office. She should be back – this afternoon. 
 Speak to you – this evening, then.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2020

p. 5

Definitions of prepositions of time grammar presentation
Match the prepositions of time (and no preposition) above to these meanings. Some 
prepositions have more than one meaning here so can go in more than one place, and not
all the prepositions above are used. Ones next to each other with “–” between them have 
opposite meanings.
 
a point in time, e.g. “_______ half past two in the afternoon”, “_______ the moment” or 
“__________ the end”

at some time within a longer period of time, e.g. “__________ the 20

th

 century”, “______ 

1997”, “__________ spring” or “_______ March”

a day and/ or date, e.g. “________ Christmas Day”, “_______ Monday the seventeenth of 
July”, “______________ July fourth” or “_______ Tuesday” 

with “this”, “last” and “next” and similar expressions, e.g. “________ this week”, “_______ 
last month”, “_________ tonight”, “_______ the day before yesterday” or “_______ 
tomorrow”

before now, so always past, e.g. “two days ______” meaning “the day before yesterday” – 
after now, so always future, e.g. “______ two days” meaning “the day after tomorrow”

before another time (not now), so past or future both possible, e.g. “two days ______ 
(that)” – after another time (not now), so past or future both possible, e.g. “two days 
________” or “two days ________ (that)” 

a deadline, with the point in time which you should finish before, e.g. “Can you find out and
let me know __________________ five p.m. on Friday (at the latest), because….?”

a deadline, with the length of time that you should finish before, e.g. “I’m sorry, I haven’t 
finished yet, but I should be able to finish __________________ two weeks (maximum)”

from a point in time until now, e.g. “I’ve been working here __________ 2007”

a length of time, e.g. “I’ve been working here ______________________ twelve years”, 
“I’ll be staying in New York ____________ two days”. 

Test each other on the prepositions of time above:
-

Read out the definition and a blanked example for your partner to complete

-

Read out just a blanked example for your partner to complete

-

Read out completed blanked examples and see if your partner can make a suitable ex-
planation of the meaning and/ or use of that preposition of time

-

Read out the explanation and help your partner make as many suitable examples as
possible

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2020

p. 6

Brainstorming stage
First of all without looking above, write as many suitable phrases as you can in each gap 
below. Many phrases not below as also possible. 
Starting emails

Starting conversations/ Meeting people (again)

Small talk

Ending the small talk and getting down to business (looking at the meeting agenda, 
giving the reason for the call, etc)

Dealing with phone calls for other people

Talking about trends/ changes (forecasts, etc)

Giving advice/ Recommendations

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2020

p. 7

Requests/ Asking for help

Offers/ Giving help

Talking about progress (checking progress, promising future progress, etc)

Making arrangements (fixing meetings, making and replying to invitations, etc)

Ending phone calls

Ending meetings

Mentioning future contact

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2020

p. 8

Use the key words below to help, look at the phrases above, then check with the answers. 
Starting emails
ago 

on

since

Starting conversations/ Meeting people (again)
ago

before

for 

Small talk
after

ago

at

since

Ending the small talk and getting down to business
at

by

in

until 

Dealing with phone calls for other people
ago

at

– 

Talking about trends/ changes (forecasts, etc)
after

ago

in

since

within 

Giving advice/ Recommendations
for

on

until 

Requests/ Asking for help
after

by

for

on

Offers/ Giving help
at

Talking about progress (checking progress, promising future progress, etc)
before

by

until

within

yet

– 

Making arrangements (fixing meetings, making and replying to invitations, etc)
after 

at

by 

for 

in

on 

– 

Ending phone calls
at

in

– . 

Ending meetings
before

in

Mentioning future contact
in

on

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2020

p. 9

Suggested answers by function
Starting emails
 Thank you for your email – yesterday.
 I’m writing about our meeting on Monday.
 Thank you very much for your email two days ago
 I am sorry it has been so long since my last email. 
 Thanks for your email – this morning.

Starting conversations/ Meeting people (again)
 I don’t know if you remember me, but we met here the year before last. 
 Harry? It’s Alex. Graham introduced us two weeks ago
 Actually, we’ve known each other for years. It’s great to see you again, Jules.

Small talk
 What are you working on at the moment?
 I really like your office. It looks lively around here. Is there much to do at night?
 Do you have to go straight back to your office after this (meeting)?
 Did you see the (big/ Man U and Man City) match the day before yesterday?
 Long time no see! I’ve haven’t seen you since the last trade fair. How have you been?
 Long time no see. How have you been since we last met?
 Do you have many more meetings – today?
 Are you doing anything special – this weekend?
 I met your colleague Joao Fern – last year. Does he still work in your department?
 It’s a lovely area. I was last here ten years ago, but it hasn’t really changed. 
 Have you been busy – this week?

Ending the small talk and getting down to business (looking at the meeting agenda, 
giving the reason for the call, etc)
 So, you must tell me more about that later, but I have another meeting at midday, so 

we should probably get started, if that is okay. 

 Well, I’d love to chat more, but we have to leave this room by eleven thirty (at the 

latest), so let’s get down to business, shall we?

 Anyway, we only have this room until two, so shall we make a start, if you don’t mind?
 Anyway, I’m phoning about the meeting in April.

Dealing with phone calls for other people
 I’m sorry, he left the office just a few minutes ago. Do you have his mobile number?
 I’m afraid she’s in a meeting at the moment. Would you like to leave a message?
 I’m sorry but she’s out of the office. She should be back – this afternoon. 

Talking about trends/ changes (forecasts, etc)
 We forecast that income will creep up next year and accelerate the year after next. 
 If you can’t make it next week, how about the week after next?
 We had a few blips in the recent past, but demand has stabilised recently. 
 We expect sales to fully bounce back within the next quarter.
 Sales plateaued a few years ago, but have stayed quite stable since then, with no big 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2020

p. 10

dips. 

 We’re planning to launch the new product in winter 2021, and we predict that income 

will rocket straightaway.

 My firm was founded in Birmingham in 1789 but it only grew slowly for the first century.
 There was a little dip in profits two years ago, but profits have recovered since then. 

Giving advice/ Recommendations
 Everything will be closed on Christmas Day, so make sure you buy food by Xmas Eve.
 Thanks for coming all this way on such a cold day.
 I’d like to meet on Monday the nineteenth of April, if that is convenient with you. 
 I recommend the restaurant on the second floor of your hotel. It’s very reasonable and 

it’s open until eleven p.m. every day.

 I’m here in Osaka for the next four days. Is there anything I should do while I’m here? 
 I’m only here for three days. What sightseeing spots do you most recommend?

Requests/ Asking for help
 Can you give me a hand with the presentation the day after tomorrow?
 Could you let me know by close of business on Friday?
 The AGM will be on the thirteenth of January, so can you get the PowerPoint ready be-

fore that?

 Can I borrow your dictionary for a few minutes?

Offers/ Giving help
 If you have any further questions, please feel free to phone again at any time. 
 We’ll discuss that at the end of the quarter, then I’ll let you know what we decide. 
 I’ll be happy to answer any questions at the end of the presentation. 

Talking about progress (checking progress, promising future progress, etc)
 I’m afraid I haven’t made much progress, but I should finish by the end of next week.
 As you can see from this line graph, we expect to double our market share by (the end

of) 2025. 

 I don’t think we can finish it but I’ll continue working on it until the thirty first. 
 Sorry for the delay. I’ll do it as soon as I can, and definitely within two days. 
 I finished it – this morning. Do you have another project for me?
 How are you getting on with the project you were given the month before last?
 I’m afraid I haven’t finished the report yet. Can we extend the time limit by two days?
 Have they delivered the raw materials yet?

Making arrangements (fixing meetings, making and replying to invitations, etc)
 Are you available the day after tomorrow?
 My meeting finishes at five p.m, so we can go out for a drink after that, if you like.
 Unfortunately I will be travelling to Libya at just that time. How about later in the week?
 I’ll make sure I’m at the airport by the time you arrive, so I’ll meet you in arrivals.
 I’m sorry but I’m busy all morning. Do you have any time in the afternoon?
 We’re considering having a press conference in three days’ time. Can you come?
 I’m afraid the office is closed on Independence Day. How about the day after that?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2020

p. 11

 Are you free to meet on Friday afternoon?
 I’m sorry, I’m busy – tomorrow. How about the day after tomorrow?
 Do you fancy coming to our Xmas party – tonight?
 Are you doing anything – tonight?
 That a pity. We’ll definitely let you know sooner – next time.
 My plane lands at a quarter to six in the morning, so can we meet an hour after that?
 That’s fine, but my next meeting starts at a quarter past three, so I’ll need to finish be-

fore then. 

 I’m going to York for a few days, so can we meet at the end of next week?
 Are you doing anything special – this weekend?
 Would you like to join us for dinner – this evening?
 Great. You won’t regret it. I’ll email you a map – later (today).

Ending phone calls
 If you have any further questions, please feel free to phone again at any time. 
 That’s fine. Speak to you – later, then. 
 Okay, I’ll pass your message onto him. I’m sure he will get back to you – soon.
 No, that’s okay, thanks. I’ll just call again – later. Thanks for your help. 
 I’m just about to get on the train, so can you call again in about an hour when I get off?

Ending meetings
 Anyway, I have another meeting  in  10 minutes, so we’ll have to stop there, if that’s

okay.

 We   don’t   seem   to   be   getting   anywhere.   Let’s   sleep   on   this   and   try   again   –   next

Monday. 

 We still have five minutes left, so is there any other business before we bring the 

meeting to a close?

 That sounds perfect, but I just need to check with my boss before I can sign. 
 I’ll check with my boss and get back to you in the next two days.

Mentioning future contact
 I hope we have the chance to do business again in the near future. 
 See you on Monday.
 Okay, see you in a few minutes, then. 
 I’ll send you an update in April, probably on the 15

th

.

 I look forward to meeting you – next week. 
 Speak to you – this evening, then.

Play a similar guessing prepositions game. Choose one section above, say its title, and 
read out two or three phrases with gapped prepositions for your partner(s) to guess. They 
can be the same or different prepositions this time. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2020

p. 12

Prepositions of time roleplays
Choose one example sentence from above, think of and explain a suitable situation to use 
that sentence, then roleplay that situation with your partner (just saying what you would 
write if it’s an emailing situation). 

Roleplay the situations, using the list of phrases above to help. For emailing ones, just say 
what you would write. 
 Meet someone who you’ve met before and just chat
 Meet someone who you haven’t met for a long time and catch up with their news
 Meet someone who you’ve met before, chat, and then start a business meeting with

them

 Meet someone who you’ve met before and chat, including recommending places to go
 Meet someone who you’ve met before, chat, and end with an invitation
 Have a business meeting including a PowerPoint presentation with line graphs
 Make arrangements (e.g. fix a meeting) by phone 
 Make arrangements (e.g. fix a meeting) by email
 Ask for advice by phone 
 Ask for advice by email
 Make a request by email
 Make a request by phone
 Hold a progress check meeting
 Phone someone and ask to speak to someone else (who is not there)
 Take part in a job interview, including discussion of your past, present and future
 Take part in a performance review with your boss, including setting goals

Do the same with just the lists of prepositions to help, then with no help.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2020

p. 13

Different ways of saying times presentation
Write at least one other way of saying each time below. Some can take the same 
preposition of time, but some need different ones. Then look above for ideas. 
 in two days 
 in two years 
 in two weeks 
 in three days 
 now/ presently/ currently 
 at noon 
 at eight o’clock in the evening 
 before Saturday 
 soon 
 recently 
 see you Monday 
 on July 4

th

 

 in the afternoon on Friday 
 on the twenty fifth of December 
 on January 13

th

 

 eleven o’clock in the evening 
 within the next three months 
 later today 
 at five forty five a.m. 
 at three fifteen 
 the day before yesterday 
 two years ago 
 two months ago 
 for three or four minutes 

Test each other on the expressions below:
-

Read out one of the paired phrases and the NOT… X phrase and see if your partner
can repeat back the correct version

-

Read out one expression and see if your partner can say something with same mean-
ing

-

Choose one of the lines with more than two expressions with the same meanings, read
out two, and see if your partner can say something else with the same meaning

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2020

p. 14

Suggested answers
Ones in brackets () with NOT and X don’t have that meaning or are incorrect English.
 in two days – the day after tomorrow (NOT two days later X NOT two days after X)
 in two years – the year after next (NOT two years later X NOT two days after X)
 in two weeks – the week after next (NOT two weeks later X NOT two weeks after X)
 in three days – in three days’ time
 now/ presently/ currently – at the moment (NOT at that moment X)
 at noon – at midday/ at 12 p.m./ at twelve o’clock in the afternoon
 at eight o’clock in the evening – at eight o’clock at night/ at eight p.m. (NOT at eight

o’clock p.m. X NOT at twenty o’clock X NOT at eight o’clock in the afternoon X) 

 before Saturday – by Friday (NOT on Friday X)
 soon – in the near future
 recently – in the recent past (NOT in the near past X)
 see you Monday – see you on Mon/ see you next Mon (NOT see you on next Mon X)
 on July 4

th

 – on Independence Day/ on the 4

th

 of July

 in the afternoon on Friday – on Friday afternoon (NOT in Friday afternoon X)
 on the twenty fifth of December – on Christmas Day/ on December 25

th

 on January 13

th

 – on the 13

th

 of January

 eleven o’clock in the evening – eleven p.m./ eleven o’clock at night
 within the next three months – within the next quarter/ in the next quarter/ in the next 3

months (NOT in three months X)

 later today – later (NOT soon X)
 at five forty five a.m. – at a quarter to six in the morning
 at three fifteen – at (a) quarter past three
 the day before yesterday – two days ago (NOT 2 days before X NOT 2 days earlier X)
 two years ago – the year before last (NOT the year before last year X)
 two months ago – the month before last
 for three or four minutes – for a few minutes

Differences between prepositions of time
Explain the different meanings of these pairs of prepositions of time expressions:
 in two days/ two days after (that)
 in two days/ two days later
 by Saturday/ before Saturday
 on Christmas Day/ at Christmas
 in three months/ within three months
 two years ago/ two years earlier
 two years ago/ two years before (that)
 I need it until Friday/ I need it by Friday

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2020

p. 15

Choose one of the pairings below and tell your partner what both words are. Then choose 
a sentence with one of those two words from above for your partner to guess the missing 
word from. If they are wrong, explain why it’s a mistake. 
 at/ on
 on/ in
 on/ - (= nothing)
 in/ -
 ago/ before
 in/ after
 in/ within
 by/ within
 for/ since

Try to do the same with these pairings, making up your own example sentences:
 yet/ already

Prepositions of time opposites
Write opposites of the expressions below:
-

tomorrow

-

last week

-

the day before yesterday

-

two days ago

-

two day earlier/ two days before (that)

-

in a week

-

in the distant past

-

in the near future/ soon

-

I have already done it

---------------------------------------------------------fold------------------------------------------------

Suggested answers
-

tomorrow - yesterday

-

last week – next week

-

the day before yesterday – the day after tomorrow

-

two days ago – in two days

-

two day earlier – two days later/ two days after (that)

-

in a week – a week ago

-

in the distant past – in the distant future/ in the recent past

-

in the near future/ soon – in the recent past/ recently/ in the distant future

-

I have already done it – I haven’t done it yet

Test each other on the phrases, including in the opposite way (saying the word on the right
for your partner to remember one on the left). 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2020

p. 16

Terms of Use

Lesson plans & worksheets can be used by teachers without any fee in the classroom; however, please ensure you keep all copyright information and references to UsingEnglish.com in place.

You will need Adobe Reader to view these files.

Get Adobe Reader