Presentations- Dealing with Questions and Problems

Level: Advanced

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Questions

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (117 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Dealing with questions and problems in presentations
Part One: Predicting and answering questions

Listen to your partners’ presentations in small groups, asking at least two or three 
questions afterwards and then giving feedback. 

Suggested questions – alphabetical by key words

Did you already explain…?

Could I ask...?

Can I take you back to the place where…?

basically know what you meant when you said…, but…

I didn't (quite) catch what you said about…

(Just) to check if I (fully) understand you,…

I’m not (quite) clear what you mean by …/ Can I clear up whether you mean...?/ Can 
you clear up for me whether…?

Can I/ you confirm (whether)…?

What's the connection between... and...?

There seems to be a contradiction between… and…

So, would it be correct to say that…?

If I understand/ understood you correctly,…

Do you have any data on…?

How would you define…?

Can you give (me/ us) some more details on…?

I get the general drift of what you were saying about…, but…

Can you elaborate on…?

Can you give (me/ us) an(other) example (of what you mean/ of the kind of thing you 
mean/ of what you are talking about)?

Can you explain a little more about…?/ Can you explain what you mean by...?

What evidence do you have that...?

I’m not (very) familiar with the word/ term/ meaning of…

I couldn’t really follow

Can you go back to the third/ third or fourth/ last slide?/ Going back to what you were
saying about...,...

I’m guessing that… means…

I’d be interested in hearing more about…

I was interested in the bit/ part where you said…

What makes you think that…?

Does… mean…?

You did mention this in your presentation, but...

I don't think you mentioned

Sorry, just one more question (about that).

mostly understand what you’re saying, but…

… is a new term/ new concept for me.

What precisely…?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

What are your predictions for…?

I have a question about…

What were you referring to when you mentioned…?

Would I be right in saying…?

Could you run through… again?

Did you say…?

So, what you're saying is...

I see what you mean by..., but...

Perhaps you could say something (more) about...

What does… stand for?

How would you summarise…?

Could you tell me...?

Can you explain… in layperson’s terms?

There’s one thing I don’t (quite) understand.

Is it true that…?/ Isn't it true that...?

I’m afraid I didn’t understand what you meant when you said…

Work together to predict questions you might be asked during your presentation. 

Ask each other questions on your presentation topics, using the questions you came up 
plus other suggested questions below. 

What problems might you have when you are asked questions? 

How might you deal with those questions? What can you say and do?

Dealing with questions and problems in presentations
Part Two: Dealing with difficult questions etc

What would you do and say in the situations below? Start with discussing the ones which 
are most likely in your own presentations. 

It seems like nobody wants to be the first to ask a question/ Nobody starts the questions

It seems that several/ many people want to ask questions at the same time 

One person dominates the questions and it looks like others want to ask questions too 

Someone asks a question which you've already answered 

Someone asks for information that you already gave during your presentation 

The information is somewhere in your notes 

The information is on a slide 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

The answer to the question will be later in the presentation 

The question is off topic 

The question only interests one person 

You don’t know the answer to the question 

You aren't 100 percent sure of the answer 

You know the answer to the question but can’t share that information (e.g. because it’s 
private or confidential)

You don’t agree with a comment or the implications behind a question

You don’t understand the question 

You meant to give the information that is being asked for in the presentation but forgot 

You think your answer will surprise them/ is not what they expect 

Your answer (partly) contradicts what you said earlier 

You get a question when you are right in the middle of saying something 

You have trouble remembering what you were talking about before you were interrupted 

A question makes the discussion go off topic 

Interruptions means that you are having difficulty getting through your presentation 

There seem to be questions or doubts but no one has interrupted you

One person seems to have a question but hasn’t put up their hand

The question is too complex to answer quickly

You should’ve been able to predict that question coming up, but didn’t

You couldn’t answer the last two or three questions

Ask your teacher about any which you aren’t sure about. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Suggested answers
Compare your answers with those below. Many more answers are possible, so if you 
discussed something different, ask your teacher if that is also okay. 
It seems like nobody wants to be the first to ask a question/ Nobody starts the questions – 
Don’t be shy./ I’ll be disappointed if I don’t get at least one or two questions./ Absolutely 
any question at all is okay./ For example, does anyone have any questions about…?

It seems that several/ many people want to ask questions at the same time – Yes, the lady 
in the corner over there./ Yes, the gentleman with the orange jumper. What would you like 
to ask me?/ So many questions! Great! If you don’t mind, I’ll start with the people at the 
back and work my way forward. 

One person dominates the questions and it looks like others want to ask questions too – 
Can I come back to you in a minute?/ If I could take some other questions. 

Someone asks a question which you've already answered – That’s similar to the question I
answered earlier when…/ As I said earlier,…/ As I said in reply to… question,….

Someone asks for information that you already gave during your presentation – That’s 
related to my introduction, where I said…/ You may remember I showed a graph which…/ I
only mentioned this briefly, but…

The information is somewhere in your notes – Just a second while I find that information in
my notes./ Sorry, I have this information somewhere. 

The information is on a slide – That’s in here somewhere. Just a minute while I find the 
right slide./ If I can just go back a couple of slides to look at that chart in more detail. 

The answer to the question will be later in the presentation – That’s a great question, and 
I’ll be coming to that…/ I’m glad you asked me that, because I’m planning to…

The question is off topic – That doesn’t seem to be directly related to…, so maybe you’d 
be better asking me in person later./ That’s a very interesting question, but not exactly on 
the topic at hand. I’d love to be able to talk about it later. 

The question only interests one person – That’s a great question but perhaps a little 
specific for most people here. However, I’ll be happy to answer in person later. 

You don’t know the answer to the question – I’m afraid I didn’t research that, but…/ I don’t 
have any actual data on that, but…

You aren't 100 percent sure of the answer – I can’t guarantee this, but I think it’s 
something like…

You know the answer to the question but can’t share that information (e.g. because it’s 
private or confidential) – That’s an interesting question, but hopefully you can understand 
why I need to keep that information private. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

You don’t agree with a comment or the implications behind a question – That’s an 
interesting question, but I’d be much more inclined to say…/ Your question seems to 
suggest you think…, but my own opinion would be more like…

You don’t understand the question – So, are you asking…?/ So, you want to know…

You meant to give the information that is being asked for in the presentation but forgot – 
Sorry, I meant to mention this in the presentation. The answer is…/ Sorry for not explaining
this before. 

You think your answer will surprise them/ is not what they expect – You may be 
(pleasantly/ unpleasantly) surprised to hear that…/ You might be expecting the answer to 
be, but in fact…/ Actually,…/ To be honest,…

Your answer (partly) contradicts what you said earlier – Although I said earlier that…/ I 
might have confused you earlier when I said…

You get a question when you are right in the middle of saying something – If I can just get 
to the end of this slide first./ I’ll be very happy to answer just as soon as…

You have trouble remembering what you were talking about before you were interrupted – 
Where was I? Oh yes,…/ What was I saying? Oh yeah,…

A question makes the discussion go off topic – To get back to the point at hand,…

Interruptions means that you are having difficulty getting through your presentation – 
Perhaps we can leave any further questions until the end. 

There seem to be questions or doubts but no one has interrupted you – As I said earlier, 
please feel free to interrupt if anything isn’t clear./ Any questions before we go on?

One person seems to have a question but hasn’t put up their hand – I can see that some 
people have questions./ I get the feeling that there are questions. 

The question is too complex to answer quickly – That’s a bit too complicated to go into 
right now, but…/ It might take me a bit too long to answer that in detail, but…

You should’ve been able to predict that question coming up, but didn’t – I probably should 
have known that someone would ask me that, but…/ That’s such an obvious question, but 
unfortunately…

You couldn’t answer the last two or three questions – I hope I can do better with the next 
question./ Sorry about that. Please don’t let it put you off asking more questions. 
Analyse the examples above. What general tips on dealing with questions can you draw 
from the examples above? What do the good phrases have in common?

Compare your ideas with those on the next page.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Tactics for good answering of questions
-

Being specific when apologising

-

Complimenting the questioner/ Being positive about the question

-

Being politely indirect

-

Using polite language

Find at least one example of each of those things in the examples above.

Circle positive language in the examples. 

Underline polite/ softening/ indirect language in examples. Some might be the same as the
language you have just circled. 

What language can you use to deal with these more common situations?
-

Explaining the policy on questions

-

Starting the Q&A

-

Selecting people to ask questions

-

Ending the Q&A

Dealing with questions and problems in presentations
Part Three: Dealing with other kinds of problems

Use similar tactics and language to write at least one phrase to say in each of the 
situations below.

You find mistakes or out of date information in the slides or handouts

The technology stops working, doesn’t work properly or is slow

People are looking tired/ hot/ cold/ restless

The font of some text is too small for people to see

Someone spills a drink

Everywhere you can stand blocks someone’s view of the screen

You’re going over the allotted time

People can’t find their place in the documents they have in front of them

You lose your place in your notes

You want to use a word which is difficult or impossible to translate into English

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Suggested answers – With useful language in bold
It seems like nobody wants to be the first to ask a question/ Nobody starts the questions – 
Don’t be shy./ I’ll be disappointed if I don’t get at least one or two questions./ Absolutely 
any question at all is okay./ For example, does anyone have any questions about…?

It seems that several/ many people want to ask questions at the same time – Yes, the lady
in the corner over there./ Yes, the gentleman with the orange jumper. What would you like 
to ask me?/ So many questions! Great! If you don’t mind, I’ll start with the people at the 
back and work my way forward. 

One person dominates the questions and it looks like others want to ask questions too – 
Can I come back to you in a minute?/ If I could take some other questions. 

Someone asks a question which you've already answered – That’s similar to the question 
I answered earlier when…/ As I said earlier,…/ As I said in reply to… question,….

Someone asks for information that you already gave during your presentation – That’s 
related to my introduction, where I said…/ You may remember I showed a graph which…/ I
only mentioned this briefly, but…

The information is somewhere in your notes – Just a second while I find that information 
in my notes./ Sorry, I have this information somewhere. 

The information is on a slide – That’s in here somewhere. Just a minute while I find the 
right slide./ If I can just go back a couple of slides to look at that chart in more detail. 

The answer to the question will be later in the presentation – That’s a great question, and 
I’ll be coming to that…/ I’m glad you asked me that, because I’m planning to…

The question is off topic – That doesn’t seem to be directly related to…, so maybe you’d 
be better
 asking me in person later./ That’s a very interesting question, but not exactly 
on the topic at hand. I’d love to be able to talk about it later. 

The question only interests one person – That’s a great question but perhaps a little 
specific for most people here. However, I’ll be happy to answer in person later. 

You don’t know the answer to the question – I’m afraid I didn’t research that, but…/ I don’t 
have any actual data on that, but…

You aren't 100 percent sure of the answer – I can’t guarantee this, but I think it’s 
something like

You know the answer to the question but can’t share that information (e.g. because it’s 
private or confidential) – That’s an interesting question, but hopefully you can 
understand
 why I need to keep that information private. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

You don’t agree with a comment or the implications behind a question – That’s an 
interesting question, but I’d be much more inclined to say…/ Your question seems to 
suggest
 you think…, but my own opinion would be more like

You don’t understand the question – So, are you asking…?/ So, you want to know…

You meant to give the information that is being asked for in the presentation but forgot – 
Sorry, I meant to mention this in the presentation. The answer is…/ Sorry for not 
explaining this before. 

You think your answer will surprise them/ is not what they expect – You may be 
(pleasantly/ unpleasantly) surprised to hear that…/ You might be expecting the answer to 
be, but in fact…/ Actually,…/ To be honest,…

Your answer (partly) contradicts what you said earlier – Although I said earlier that…/ I 
might
 have confused you earlier when I said…

You get a question when you are right in the middle of saying something – If I can just get 
to the end of this slide first./ I’ll be very happy to answer just as soon as…

You have trouble remembering what you were talking about before you were interrupted – 
Where was I? Oh yes,…/ What was I saying? Oh yeah,…

A question makes the discussion go off topic – To get back to the point at hand,…

Interruptions means that you are having difficulty getting through your presentation – 
Perhaps we can leave any further questions until the end. 

There seem to be questions or doubts but no one has interrupted you – As I said earlier, 
please feel free to interrupt if anything isn’t clear./ Any questions before we go on?

One person seems to have a question but hasn’t put up their hand – I can see that some 
people have questions./ I get the feeling that there are questions. 

The question is too complex to answer quickly – That’s a bit too complicated to go into 
right now, but…/ It might take me a bit too long to answer that in detail, but…

You should’ve been able to predict that question coming up, but didn’t – I probably should
have known that someone would ask me that, but…/ That’s such an obvious question, but 
unfortunately

You couldn’t answer the last two or three questions – I hope I can do better with the next 
question./ Sorry about that. Please don’t let it put you off asking more questions. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Dealing with questions in presentations politeness competition game
Choose one of the phrases below and take turns making it longer and more polite. You 
can change the words there as much as you like as long as the function remains the 
same. Stop whenever everyone gives up making it more so or the attempts are not as 
long or polite as those that came before, then discuss which the best phrase actually was. 

Ask me questions, please!

Yes, you. Ask me your question.

Please let other people ask questions.

I’ve already answered that question.

I already told you that in the presentation.

Wait. I have that information in my notes.

Wait. That’s on a slide.

I’m going to talk about that later.

Your question is off topic.

The other people aren’t interested in your question.

I don’t know.

It’s… or something like that. 

I can’t tell you. It’s a secret.

Your question shows that you have the wrong opinion on this.

I can’t understand your question.

I know I said… but…

Let me finish this first.

I forgotten what I was saying before you interrupted me. 

You’ve made us go off topic.

I’ll never finish if there are more interruptions.

You look like you don’t understand. No questions? Really?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014