Presentations- Formality Brainstorming and Correction

Level: Advanced

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Functions & Text

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (117 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Formality in Presentations- Brainstorming and Correction
Present your ideas to your partner, inviting questions and then your partner’s opinion.

Do the same, but this time pretending you are giving a formal presentation on the same 
topic to a large audience. Start your presentation with “
I’d like to get started, if I may. Good
morning/ afternoon ladies and gentlemen.” and end with “If there are no further questions, 
I’d like to draw my presentation to a close”. Your partners must raise their hands to ask 
questions.

What were the differences between your formal presentation to a large audience and your 
informal presentation to a small audience? What other differences could there be between
presentations in those two situations?

Continue your discussion with the topics below the fold
------------------------------------
Stages
Starting
Getting people’s attention/ Starting the introduction

Greetings

Showing awareness of the audience/ Connecting with the audience

Introducing yourself

Setting out what you will talk about and why (topic, aim and organisation of your 
presentation)

Hooking the audience

Ending the introduction and starting the body of the presentation

Ending
Concluding (= Stating a conclusion)

Ending the body of the presentation

Inviting questions

Dealing with questions (including not being able to answer questions)

Ending the Q&A

Thanking at the end

Handing over to the next person

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

More general issues
Body language/ Gestures

Polite/ formal language

Stress and intonation

Brainstorm phrases to do the things in “Stages” above for your real presentation (e.g. with 
a group of 15 peers who know you fairly well but who might not know your name). 

There are suggested answers for a medium level formality presentation below, but with 
mistakes. Each section has:
-

one which is too formal

-

one which is too informal (or even rude)

-

one which has an error such as a grammar mistake in it.

Cross out two and correct one phrase in each section.  

After checking your answers, look back at your brainstormed sentences and see if you can
find any errors or things which are too formal or informal for your own (real) presentations. 

Check your brainstormed sentences as a class. 

Analyse the example sentences for these things, then try to make more good examples, 
perhaps based on the phrases you originally brainstormed:
-

What different kinds of hooks are there? (= What different tactics can you use to hook 
your audience?)

-

What are the criteria of a good aim?

Choose, correct and/ or write suitable phrases for your own future presentation(s), paying 
particular attention to formality and other suitability for the situation and audience. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Starting
Getting people’s attention/ Starting the introduction
If I may have your attention, I’d like to get started, if I may.
Okay, can I get started?
Right. Attention, please. Please listen to my presentation.
So, shall we get started?
Well then, let’s have a start, shall we?

Greeting
Good morning/ afternoon ladies and gentlemen. Thank you for finding the time to come 
and join me for this presentation.
Good morning/ afternoon/ evening (everyone).
Hello everyone.
Hi everybodies. 
How’s it going?/ Wassup?/ Alright?

Showing awareness of the audience/ Connecting with the audience
I know you all think about your own presentations, so…
I’m sure you know nothing about my presentation topic, so…
I’m sure you’re all sleepy after lunch, so…
It’s nice to see so many familiar faces. I’m flattered that you would come here on such a 
nice sunny day.

Introducing yourself
As most you know,…
For those (of you) who don’t know me already,…
I guess you all know me, right?
I think all of you know my face but perhaps not my name, so…
Please allow me to introduce myself.

Giving the topic
I’m going to discuss about…
I’m not sure if this is a good topic but I couldn’t think of anything else, so…
I’ve been invited here today to share with you…
I’ve chosen to present…
I’ve decided to speak about…
In my presentation I’d like to talk to you about…
My presentation is about…
The subject/ topic of my presentation is…
What I’d like to explain/ present to you in my presentation is…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Explaining your aim
After this presentation, I hope most of you will…
By presenting this, I hope to…
By end of my presentation, I want to show you that…
My goal is to change your mind about…
To set out my mission in presenting this to you,…
What I want to achieve by presenting this to you is… 
Why the hell did I choose that topic? Well,…
Why would I choose such a strange topic? Well,…
With this presentation I aim to convince you that…

Giving a hook
… once said that…
Did you know that…?
Few people know that…
Have you ever wonder…?
How many people here…?
I think this is an important topic (in the modern world) because…
I think we should all be interested in this topic because…
It’s a bit of a dirty joke, but…
Just yesterday this topic was in the news because…
Please raise your hand if…
There’s an amazing statistic that…
To pique your interest, I’d like to start with a quotation, if I may.

Explaining the structure of the presentation
I’ve divided my presentation into… parts.
My presentation divided into...parts.
First, I’ll explain…
Firstly, I’ll present…
First of all, I’ll look at…
I’ll begin by showing you…
I’ll start by giving you some (background) information on…
Second(ly), I’ll share…
In the second part of my presentation, I’ll move onto…
Then, I’ll focus on…
After that, I’ll spend some time on…
Next, we’ll examine…
Last/ Last of all/ Lastly/ To finish up/ The last stage will be to…/ Finally/ I’ll end with…
In the penultimate part, the presentation will move onto…
Then at last I’ll be able to get to…

Ending the introduction and starting the body of the presentation
If there are no questions at this stage, my presentation will commence with…
Everything clear? So, let’s go!
So, if there are no question so far…
So, let’s start by looking at…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Ending
Stating a conclusion
I hope none of you now have any doubt that…
I think all of this proves that…
If I had to summarise all of that in one sentence, I would probably say…
In conclusion,…
It is quite difficult to draw conclusions, but…
One cannot but draw the conclusion that…  
So, to summarise up what I have told you,…
With the evidence that I’ve given you, any idiot can see that…

Ending the body of the presentation
…which is last thing that I wanted to say.
And on that point, I would like to conclude today’s presentation.
That brings me to the end of my presentation.
That’s all I wanted to say (on this topic).
That’s all./ That’s it.

Inviting questions
Are there any (more/ further) questions?
Does anyone (else) have any question?
I will conclude my presentation with a question and answer stage. Please raise your hand 
and I will invite each person individually to ask any questions that may have arisen.
I will now answer any questions you may have about this topic.
I’ll now be happy to answer questions.
If anyone has any questions, I’ll do my best to answer them now.
Please put your hand up if you have any questions.
Questions please.

Dealing with questions
(That’s a) (very) good question. Well,…
I’m glad you asked that.
If I understand you correctly, you are asking…
Just a second while I look at my notes.
Just to check, you want to know…
Let me see.
Let me think.
So, what you’re asking is... 
Sorry for not explaining this before.
That’s a difficult/ tricky question.
That’s interesting question.
Yes, please go ahead.
Yes, sir/ madam. What would you like to ask me?
Yes, what's your question please?    
Yes? (Please ask your question).

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Not being able to answer questions
I have no idea.
I’m afraid I am not in a position to be able to comment on that at this time. 
I’m afraid but I didn’t research that point, but…
I’m sorry but I don’t have that information, but…
Unfortunately, I don’t know the answer to that question, but…

Ending the questions
I seem to have run out of time, so…
I’d love to be able to talk further, but I’m afraid the time available to us has come to an end.
If there are no more questions,…
If you have any further questions, please come and talk to me afterwards. 
No more questions, please.
Someone’s signalling to me that I’ve run out of time, so…
There don’t seem be any more questions, so…

Thanking at the end
I really appreciate your attention so soon after lunch.  
It’s been an honour to be able to present to you. 
Thank you for listening (so attentively). 
Thanks you for your kind attention. 
Thanks for putting up with my terrible English.
Thanks for your great questions. 

Handing over to the next person
I’d now like to hand you over to my colleague…
I’m sure the next presentator wants to get started, so I’ll hand over to them now.
I look forward to hearing the next person’s presentation. 
Your turn.

Can you change any of the ones which are too formal or informal to make them suitable?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Partial answer key
The phrases with problems are marked in bold below
Starting
Getting people’s attention/ Starting the introduction
If I may have your attention, I’d like to get started, if I may.
Okay, can I get started?
Right. Attention, please. Please listen to my presentation.
So, shall we get started?
Well then, let’s have a start, shall we?

Greeting
Good morning/ afternoon ladies and gentlemen. Thank you for finding the time to 
come and join me for this presentation.
Good morning/ afternoon/ evening (everyone).
Hello everyone.
Hi everybodies. 
How’s it going?/ Wassup?/ Alright?

Showing awareness of the audience/ Connecting with the audience
I know you all think about your own presentations, so…
I’m sure you know nothing about my presentation topic, so…
I’m sure you’re all sleepy after lunch, so…
It’s nice to see so many familiar faces. I’m flattered that you would come here on 
such a nice sunny day.

Introducing yourself
As most you know,…
For those (of you) who don’t know me already,…
I guess you all know me, right?
I think all of you know my face but perhaps not my name, so…
Please allow me to introduce myself.

Giving the topic
I’m going to discuss about…
I’m not sure if this is a good topic but I couldn’t think of anything else, so…
I’ve been invited here today to share with you…
I’ve chosen to present…
I’ve decided to speak about…
In my presentation I’d like to talk to you about…
My presentation is about…
The subject/ topic of my presentation is…
What I’d like to explain/ present to you in my presentation is…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Explaining your aim
After this presentation, I hope most of you will…
By presenting this, I hope to…
By end of my presentation, I want to show you that…
My goal is to change your mind about…
To set out my mission in presenting this to you,…
What I want to achieve by presenting this to you is… 
Why the hell did I choose that topic? Well,…
Why would I choose such a strange topic? Well,…
With this presentation I aim to convince you that…

Giving a hook
… once said that…
Did you know that…?
Few people know that…
Have you ever wonder…?
How many people here…?
I think this is an important topic (in the modern world) because…
I think we should all be interested in this topic because…
It’s a bit of a dirty joke, but…
Just yesterday this topic was in the news because…
Please raise your hand if…
There’s an amazing statistic that…
To pique your interest, I’d like to start with a quotation, if I may.

Explaining the structure of the presentation
I’ve divided my presentation into… parts.
My presentation divided into...parts.
First, I’ll explain…
Firstly, I’ll present…
First of all, I’ll look at…
I’ll begin by showing you…
I’ll start by giving you some (background) information on…
Second(ly), I’ll share…
In the second part of my presentation, I’ll move onto…
Then, I’ll focus on…
After that, I’ll spend some time on…
Next, we’ll examine…
Last/ Last of all/ Lastly/ To finish up/ The last stage will be to…/ Finally/ I’ll end with…
In the penultimate part, the presentation will move onto…
Then at last I’ll be able to get to…

Ending the introduction and starting the body of the presentation
If there are no questions at this stage, my presentation will commence with…
Everything clear? So, let’s go!
So, if there are no question so far…
So, let’s start by looking at…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Ending
Stating a conclusion
I hope none of you now have any doubt that…
I think all of this proves that…
If I had to summarise all of that in one sentence, I would probably say…
In conclusion,…
It is quite difficult to draw conclusions, but…
One cannot but draw the conclusion that…  
So, to summarise up what I have told you,…
With the evidence that I’ve given you, any idiot can see that…

Ending the body of the presentation
…which is last thing that I wanted to say.
And on that point, I would like to conclude today’s presentation.
That brings me to the end of my presentation.
That’s all I wanted to say (on this topic).
That’s all./ That’s it.

Inviting questions
Are there any (more/ further) questions?
Does anyone (else) have any question?
I will conclude my presentation with a question and answer stage. Please raise your 
hand and I will invite each person individually to ask any questions that may have 
arisen.
I will now answer any questions you may have about this topic.
I’ll now be happy to answer questions.
If anyone has any questions, I’ll do my best to answer them now.
Please put your hand up if you have any questions.
Questions please.

Dealing with questions
(That’s a) (very) good question. Well,…
I’m glad you asked that.
If I understand you correctly, you are asking…
Just a second while I look at my notes.
Just to check, you want to know…
Let me see.
Let me think.
So, what you’re asking is... 
Sorry for not explaining this before.
That’s a difficult/ tricky question.
That’s interesting question.
Yes, please go ahead.
Yes, sir/ madam. What would you like to ask me?
Yes, what's your question please?    
Yes? (Please ask your question).

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Not being able to answer questions
I have no idea.
I’m afraid I am not in a position to be able to comment on that at this time. 
I’m afraid but I didn’t research that point, but…
I’m sorry but I don’t have that information, but…
Unfortunately, I don’t know the answer to that question, but…

Ending the questions
I seem to have run out of time, so…
I’d love to be able to talk further, but I’m afraid the time available to us has come to 
an end. 
If there are no more questions,…
If you have any further questions, please come and talk to me afterwards. 
No more questions, please.
Someone’s signalling to me that I’ve run out of time, so…
There don’t seem be any more questions, so…

Thanking at the end
I really appreciate your attention so soon after lunch.  
It’s been an honour to be able to present to you. 
Thank you for listening (so attentively). 
Thanks you for your kind attention. 
Thanks for putting up with my terrible English.
Thanks for your great questions. 

Handing over to the next person
I’d now like to hand you over to my colleague…
I’m sure the next presentator wants to get started, so I’ll hand over to them now.
I look forward to hearing the next person’s presentation. 
Your turn.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014