Presentations- Preparation Tips

Level: Advanced

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Functions & Text

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (137 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Preparing Presentations- Tips
Discuss the advice below, crossing off any which should never be done under any 
circumstances. Leave any which are debatable or might be good advice under some 
circumstances, i.e. don’t tick, write question marks, etc next to the others.  

I suggest starting by brainstorming a mind map onto a large piece of blank paper, using
pencil and eraser.

I recommend brainstorming in your own language and then translating the parts that 
you need into English.

You should only write good ideas down during the brainstorming stage.

It’s generally a good idea to research before brainstorming.

It’s worth trying to roughly organise your ideas into categories as you brainstorm.

It’s a good idea to organise your ideas into bigger categories whenever your ideas dry 
up (= stop flowing), then brainstorm more examples of each.

If possible, three is the magic number (three main sections to your presentation, about 
three ideas in each section, three bullet points on one PowerPoint slide, etc).

Editing by crossing off the worst ideas and circling the best ones works well. 

Make sure you keep the audience in mind when editing your ideas down, especially 
what they will already know about the topic, what they will want to know about the top-
ic, and what you can realistically achieve by telling them about that topic.

It might be a good idea to get some feedback on your ideas before writing your Power-
Point and presentation notes.

It’s best to write a full script (exactly what you want to say in your presentation word for 
word, written in full sentences and paragraphs).

The best way to avoid reading from a script in your presentation is to write one and 
then memorise the whole thing, like learning a speech or a Shakespeare play. 

You really must write out the body of your presentation in note form (avoiding full sen-
tences, taking out all unnecessary grammar words, highlighting things you will need to 
look at when you say them like quotes and statistics, etc).

Another option is to add notes to your PowerPoint, print it out and speak from that. 

The best system is to write your presentation notes in the same order as you will actu-
ally do those things in your presentation (writing your introduction first, then writing the 
body, and finally writing the summary/ conclusion).

You should probably write full sentences and paragraphs on your PowerPoint.

A good general tip is to cut down what is in your PowerPoint as much as possible (in-
formation, data, words, slides, design such as number of fonts and ClipArt, etc).

Don’t forget to proofread your PowerPoint, using spellcheck and perhaps asking 
someone else to check it for you. 

It’s well worth looking up the pronunciation of important and difficult words in the dic-
tionary. 

A great way of preparing for the Q&A is to brainstorm questions that people are likely to
want to ask you and then thinking about your answers. 

Hint: There are seven above which definitely need to be crossed off. 

Compare the ones that you crossed off with those in bold on the next page. Note that oth-
er answers are possible. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Preparing presentations tips Suggested answers
The probably bad ideas are in bold below

I suggest starting by brainstorming a mind map onto a large piece of blank paper, using
pencil and eraser.

I recommend brainstorming in your own language and then translating the parts 
that you need into English.

You should only write good ideas down during the brainstorming stage.

It’s generally a good idea to research before brainstorming.

It’s worth trying to roughly organise your ideas into categories as you brainstorm.

It’s a good idea to organise your ideas into bigger categories whenever your ideas dry 
up (= stop flowing), then brainstorm more examples of each.

If possible, three is the magic number (three main sections to your presentation, about 
three ideas in each section, three bullet points on one PowerPoint slide, etc).

Editing by crossing off the worst ideas and circling the best ones works well. 

Make sure you keep the audience in mind when editing your ideas down, especially 
what they will already know about the topic, what they will want to know about the top-
ic, and what you can realistically achieve by telling them about that topic.

It might be a good idea to get some feedback on your ideas before writing your Power-
Point and presentation notes.

It’s best to write a full script (exactly what you want to say in your presentation 
word for word, written in full sentences and paragraphs).

The best way to avoid reading from a script in your presentation is to write one 
and then memorise the whole thing, like learning a speech or a Shakespeare 
play. 

You really must write out the body of your presentation in note form (avoiding full sen-
tences, taking out all unnecessary grammar words, highlighting things you will need to 
look at when you say them like quotes and statistics, etc).

Another option is to add notes to your PowerPoint, print it out and speak from that. 

The best system is to write your presentation notes in the same order as you will
actually do those things in your presentation (writing your introduction first, then
writing the body, and finally writing the summary/ conclusion).

You should probably write full sentences and paragraphs on your PowerPoint.

A good general tip is to cut down what is in your PowerPoint as much as possible (in-
formation, data, words, slides, design such as number of fonts and ClipArt, etc).

Don’t forget to proofread your PowerPoint, using spellcheck and perhaps asking 
someone else to check it for you. 

It’s well worth looking up the pronunciation of important and difficult words in the dic-
tionary. 

A great way of preparing for the Q&A is to brainstorm questions that people are likely to
want to ask you and then thinking about your answers. 

Underline useful language for giving advice above, then use similar language to give more
tips on presentations, e.g. more tips on planning or tips on introductions (= starting your 
presentation, before you get to the main body).

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014