Presentations- Q&A Roleplays

Level: Advanced

Topic: Profession, work or study

Grammar Topic: Questions

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (95 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Presentation Q&A Sessions Roleplays
Choose one or more of the cards on the next page and try to do those things as your 
partner presents on the topic they have prepared and/ or what they will do in the future to 
improve their English. Tell your partner whether what part of their presentation they should
start at.  If your partner doesn’t respond in the right way (e.g. not noticing that you are 
doing something), keep on trying until they do. When they have dealt with the situation, 
they should try to guess what you were doing, i.e. what your roleplay card(s) said. Then 
work together to discuss good tactics and language for dealing with that situation. 
Useful language
Explaining the policy on questions
If anything I see isn’t clear, please feel free to interrupt me at any time.
I’ll be happy to answer any questions at the end.
There’ll be time for questions/ for Q&A at the end.
Inviting questions/ Starting the Q&A
I’ll now be (very) happy to answer any questions you might have./ We’ll now have a Q&A.
Please put up/ raise your hand if you have any questions.
(Are there) any (more) questions?
Are there any questions (so far/ at this stage/ before we go on)?
Did anyone perhaps have any questions about…?/ I imagine there are some questions 
about…
Selecting people to ask questions
Yes, what is your question, please?/ Yes, what would you like to know?
Yes, please go ahead./ Yes, please ask away.
Yes, the gentleman in the corner with the green tie.
Yes, John. 
Yes, do you have a question?
Commenting on the question
(That’s a) (very) good question/ point.
That’s an interesting question.
I’m glad you asked me that.
Sorry, I should have mentioned that. 
Thanks for your question. 
I expected that question. 
I’m sure many people have the same question. 
Checking if your answer was okay
Does that answer your question?
Is that what you wanted to know?
Is that a bit clearer now?
Is that answer all right?
Do you need more details?
Ending the Q&A  
There don’t seem to be any more questions, so…
I’m afraid I’ve run out of time, but…
If there are no further questions, I’ll bring my presentation to a close/ I’ll hand over to the 
next presenter. 
If you have any further questions, I’ll be happy to answer them in person/ please come up 
and ask me/ please email me at this address and I’ll do my best to answer them.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Ask no questions in the Q&A stage.

Keep asking more and more questions (without giving anyone else the chance to do so).

Ask a question which has already been answered by what your partner said in their

presentation.

Ask a question which has already been answered in the Q&A stage (perhaps using

different words to ask the question).

Interrupt and ask about something much earlier in the presentation, e.g. in the

introduction.

Interrupt and ask about something which is on an earlier slide.

Ask about something which your partner is (probably or definitely) planning to talk about

later.

Ask an off-topic question, e.g. about your partner’s studies, hometown, or opinions on a

story which is in the news. 

Ask a question which probably doesn’t interest the other members of the audience, e.g. a

personal situation related to the presentation topic or knowledge of the presenter.

Ask a question which the presenter probably doesn’t know the answer to, e.g. a statistic.

Ask a question which is not really question but really disagreeing, e.g. “Don’t you think

that…?” or “Isn’t it true that…?”, and then keep insisting. 

Ask a difficult to understand question, e.g. a double negative like “Is it not true that people

don’t…?” or too much polite language like “I’d really appreciate it if possible if you could

take the time to give me a detail or two about…”

Ask a question that in fact everyone would probably know the answer to, e.g. “What does

(a basic word in English) mean?” or “Why do people like (something obvious like ice

cream)?”

Interrupt to ask a question when the presenter is right in the middle of saying something,

e.g. halfway through describing a chart.

Make a statement rather than asking a question, e.g. “Last week I…”

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Interrupt repeatedly.

Show from your body language (facial expression etc.) that you have doubts, but don’t

interrupt.

Keep nearly raising your hand to ask a question, then change your mind and put it down

again.

Ask a question which would have a really complex answer, e.g. “Why do humans…?” or

“What is the history behind…?”

Interrupt and ask several questions in a row.

Ask a question which is (probably) too personal to answer.

Ask a question and wrongly restate the answer when you get it (to show your lack of

understanding).

Ask a question which points out a (possible) contradiction in what has been said. 

Brainstorm phrases to deal with all of the situations above.

What general tips and generally useful language can you select from those phrases?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Without looking above, try to think of or remember at least two phrases with these 
functions:
 
Explaining the policy on questions

Inviting questions/ Starting the Q&A

Selecting people to ask questions

Commenting on the question

Checking if your answer was okay

Ending the Q&A  

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014