Public Spaces Brainstorming and Speaking

Level: Advanced

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Functions & Text

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (112 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Public Spaces Brainstorming and Speaking
Work together to brainstorm as many things as you can into the categories below. 
Whenever you get stuck move onto the next category, going back if you have more ideas 
later if you like. 

What other public spaces can you think of?
Places that can be defined as public spaces

How would you define a public space?
Definitions of a public space

What are the criteria of a good public space?
Criteria of a good public space

What can people do in public spaces?
Actions in public spaces

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

What are the potential problems with public spaces?/ What are the characteristics of a bad
public space?/ What should people not do in public spaces?
Negative things connected to public spaces

What things could there be in public spaces?
Things in public spaces

What special events could be held in public spaces?/ What things could be put there 
temporarily?
Special events in public spaces

What could you use/ change to make a public space distinctive? 
Things to vary to make public spaces distinctive

Brainstorm examples of each of those things in the last category above. 

Go through the whole list again, using things you’ve suggested later on to help improve 
each section, e.g. expanding the places which could be public places by thinking about the
uses you brainstormed. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Suggested answers and speaking tasks
What other public spaces can you think of?

(On or under) bridges

Airport concourse

Avenues/ Tree-lined streets, e.g. ones with street front cafés

Beaches/ Seawalls

Bus station concourse/ Bus stop/ Bus shelter

Station concourse

University campus/ University grounds

Canal sides

Cemeteries/ Graveyards

Elevated walkways

Flood defences

Gardens of historic buildings

Hilltops

Jetties/ Piers

Libraries

Museums and the squares in front of/ inside them

Pedestrianised streets

Playgrounds

Public dining areas in office blocks

Religious buildings (and the space around them)

Reservoirs

Riverbanks/ Riverside walks

Roads, e.g. verges between traffic

Rooftops

Ruins

Shopping malls (apart from the actual shops)

Smoking areas

Spaces between buildings

Spaces in front of historic buildings

Squares

The centre of roundabouts

Under overpasses/ Under elevated expressways

Underpasses/ Tunnels

Wide pavements

Anywhere with public seating, e.g. benches

Anywhere anyone can eat their own food

Do you disagree with any of the places mentioned above, e.g. think that they are not or 
should not be considered public places?

Choose one of the places above and say why you think restrictions should be placed on 
public access/ public use. Your partner(s) will argue the other side. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Choose an unusual one above and say how that could be made into a public space in 
your country/ town. 

How would you define a public space?

Anyone can spend time there, usually for free.

You can sit there for free, e.g. at picnic tables, on benches or on steps

You can sit outside

People want to meet there, e.g. outside stations, or hang out there, e.g. in public
squares

Which is the most important, e.g. for your town?

What are the criteria of a good public space?

A good place for people watching

Clean

Easy to maintain

Accessible, e.g. to wheelchair users and by public transport

Attractive/ Beautiful

Changes, e.g. by season or during special events

Distinctive/ Unique

Divided into a mix of small and large areas

Ecologically friendly

Educational

Enclosed/ Provides a sense of arrival/ Has clear entry and exit points

Encourages chance encounters/ unexpected encounters

Enjoyable/ Fun

Feels welcoming to all

Fits in well with the surrounding area

Flexible, e.g. with movable chairs and tables

Good atmosphere

People want to meet each other there

People want to spend time there

Photogenic/ Popular with tourists/ Iconic

Related to local culture

Relaxing

Safe

Suits the (range of) weather, e.g. shady and sunny

Suits the likely users and attracts new people

The right scale

Views from the space and/ or of the space

Do you disagree with any of the things above, e.g. think they are not important or could 
actually be bad things?

Can you think of any good examples of the things above?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Which is the most important, e.g. for your town? Choose things from above and try to think
of how to achieve them, including in new/ original ways.

What can people do in public spaces?

Chatting/ Gossiping/ Hanging out/ Killing time/ People watching

Cycling

Drinking and eating, e.g. picnic, lunch, street food or a snack

Feeding pigeons

Helping people, e.g. giving free meals to homeless people

Having a walk/ stroll

Meeting up to go off to do something else

(Children) playing

Playing chess, backgammon etc

Reading/ Studying 

Religious meetings

Sitting/ Resting/ Relaxing

Stretching their legs/ Getting some fresh air/ Clearing their heads (e.g. after using a
computer for too long)

Skateboarding/ Rollerskating

Walking dogs

Design a new/ interesting way of doing things from above. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

What are the potential problems with public spaces?/ What are the characteristics of a bad
public space?/ What should people not do in public spaces?

A lack of respect, e.g. for patriotic monuments

Bad smells

Begging

Bland/ Looks the same as everywhere else

Climbing things they shouldn’t

Crazy people shouting at passersby or proclaiming the end of the world

Crime and other dangers, e.g. pickpocketing, bag snatching, mugging or assault

Crowds

Disruption of traffic

Dogs, e.g. dog’s mess

Drinking/ Drunkenness

Dust

Eating during Ramadan

Feeding pigeons

Feels empty

Homeless people

Illegal commercial activity, e.g. leafleting, selling or surveying people 

Illegal parking, e.g. of bicycles

Inconveniencing neighbours

Is mainly used by one group of people, e.g. teenagers or old men, and that puts off
other kinds of people

Kitsch

Lack of disabled access

Loitering

Noise, e.g. traffic noise coming into the space or crowd noise coming out of it

People (or kinds of people) using them too little, e.g. because of technology at home 

Political actions, e.g. protests/ demonstrations, sit-ins/ occupations and speeches

Pollution

Public displays of affection, e.g. kissing and holding hands

Religious activity

Rubbish

Saving spaces, e.g. seating, to be used later

Sexual harassment

Sleeping

Smoking/ Smoking drugs

Too commercialised

Unmarried men and women spending time together

Vandalism, e.g. graffiti

Walking where you shouldn’t, e.g. on plants

Wild dogs and cats

Wind/ Cold

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Women with parts of their body showing

Are any of the things above not problems? Prioritise the others.

Think of solutions to the most important problems, trying to think of new ideas if you can. 
What things could there be in public spaces?

Amphitheatre

Animals

Ashtrays/ Smoking areas

Bicycle racks

Bikes for rent

Billboards

Bins

Drinking fountains

Flagpoles/ Flags

Food vendors, e.g. small outdoor cafes, stalls, carts, kiosks

Handrails

Historical artefacts (or copies of them, or things representing them)

Information and educational markers

Landmarks

Lighted paths

Parasols

Plants, e.g. grass and trees

Public art, e.g. statues/ sculpture, murals, war memorial

Ramps/ Slopes

Rickshaws

Security cameras

Shelter from the rain

Signs/ Maps

souvenir shops/ souvenir sellers

Stage/ Platform

Steps, e.g. Spanish Steps in 

Tables

Things dividing the space, e.g. trellises, fences or walls

things for children to play on

Toilets

Vending machines

Water features, e.g. fountain

Try to argue why one of the things above isn’t a good idea. Your partner(s) will take the 
opposite position. 

Try to combine the functions of two of the things above. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

What special events could be held in public spaces?/ What things could be put there 
temporarily?

Art show/ Temporary art/ Performance art

Autograph signing

Ball pool/ Bouncy castle

Ballet/ Dance performance

Beauty contest/ Talent contest

Beer festival, e.g. Oktoberfest

Blimps floating above

Blossom/ Seasonal flowers/ Flower show

Car show

Clowns/ Balloon artists

Concert (opera, classical, pop, rock, jazz, dance or world music)

Drama performance

Dry ice

Events to commemorate anniversaries, e.g. of historical events

Events to encourage civic involvement

Events to encourage pride in the country/ city/ area

Events to mark seasons, e.g. switching on of the Xmas lights

Events to raise awareness of minority groups, e.g. ethnic minorities

Face painting

Fairground

Finals of inter-school competitions, e.g. national spelling bee

Fireworks

Folk dancing (local, national and/or international)

Ice rink

International festival, e.g. an Indian festival during Diwali (the festival of lights)

Market, e.g. farmer’s market, antiques fair, book fair or flea market

Parades, e.g. military parades or changing of the guard

Political speeches, e.g. during election periods

Public sports

Putting clothes on statues

Release of balloons/ doves

School festival

Seasonal decorations, e.g. Xmas decorations

Son-et-lumiere show/ Laser show

Sponsored events to raise money for charity

Temporary beach/ lawn

Tent/ Pavilion/ Big top, e.g. a circus

Town meeting

Traditional festival

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Viewing of event elsewhere, e.g. World Cup match, on big screen(s)

Argue why one thing above actually isn’t a good idea. How could you make one of the
above distinctive and successful, without causing too much nuisance or expense?
What could you use/ change to make a public space distinctive? 

art

colours

combinations of things

interactions between people

interactions between people and things

kinds of people/ mix of people

light

lines/ directions

materials/ uses of materials

movement/ changes

nature 

objects/ uses of objects 

positions 

shapes 

sizes 

smells 

sounds 

tastes 

technology 

textures/ feelings underfoot 

Brainstorm examples of things from above, including original ideas if you can.

Suggested examples of ways of making a public space distinctive
art – installation art, performance art, 
colours – day-glo colours
combinations of things
interactions between people
interactions between people and things
kinds of people/ mix of people – the very old, disabled people, eccentric people, artists, bo-
hemians/ hippies
light – sunlight, reflected sunlight, dappled sunlight, lasers, UV light, spotlights, 
lines/ directions
materials/ uses of materials – e.g. rubber
movement/ changes
nature – fish tanks, bird cages, exotic plants, 
objects/ uses of objects – see above
positions – the landmark sculpture being sunken into the square
shapes – square, rectangle, triangle, semi-circle, 
sizes – child-sized, huge, tiny, 
smells – food, flowers, herbs, local and exotic, traditional and new
sounds – birdsong, insects (e.g. crickets), music (e.g. buskers), street noise from another

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

place, voices (e.g. by creating a place with an echo), flowing water, splashing water, local
and exotic, traditional and new, wind chimes/ bells, sounds from the surrounding area, 
tastes – local and exotic, traditional and new
technology – laser displays, audio guides, spotlights, 
textures/ feelings underfoot – wooden planking, soft surfaces, sculpture you can touch, 
How important do you think public spaces, e.g. those in this town, are?

What things can you think of that are more of a priority for local government spending?

What things can you think of that are less of a priority for local government spending?

What kinds of public spaces and changes to them should be priorities?

Decide if these things should be provided free or commercially:

Toilets

Drinking water

Cycle parking

Cycle hire

Seating, e.g. deckchairs

Tables

Exercises classes, e.g. group aerobics 

Of the ones that you decided should be free, which would you allow to become 
commercial first if there was a financial shortfall?

Are these good or bad ideas?

A Speaker’s Corner

Allowing artists to paint and sell portraits/ caricatures

Allowing buskers

Allowing charities to collect money

Banning feeding of cats and pigeons

Allowing fortune telling

Allowing people to play in the water features (e.g. fountains)

Controversial art

Forcing all large construction developments to include a public space

Forcing publically-funded organisations like universities, the royal family and museums 
to open their gardens, squares etc to the public for free

Obvious security guard/ police presence

One wall for graffiti

Periodical cleaning of the area with hoses, to also move people on

Take one side of the argument each of one of the things above and debate it until one of 
you gives up or you reach a compromise.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013