Reported Speech- Bluffing Game

A LESSON PLAN FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHERS

Level: Intermediate
Topic: General
Grammar Topic: Direct & Indirect Speech
Type: Lesson Plans
Submitted by:
Published: 10th Jul 2017

Below is a preview of the 'Reported Speech- Bluffing Game' lesson plan and is automatically generated from the PDF file. While it will look close to the original, there may be formatting differences. It's provided to allow you to view the content of the lesson plan before you download the file.

      Page: /

Lesson Plan Text

Reported Speech- Bluffing Game
Try to remember one (real) example of one of the situations below, e.g. checking into a 
flight in January this year or a football match the day before yesterday. Try to remember 
two things that people really said there and add one thing just from your imagination (in 
other words something that no one really said). Report all three things to your partner. 
Perhaps after asking for more details (about the situation, what people said, why particular
things were said, etc) your partner will guess which of those three things wasn’t really 
said.  

Useful phrases for reporting what someone said
“A man/ A woman/ Someone/ Someone there/ Someone working there…”
“The man/ The woman/ He/ She…”
“… asked if/ whether…”
“… asked when/ where/ who/ why/ which/ how/ how many/ how much/ how long…”
“… asked… to…”/ “… told… to…”
“… told… (that)…”
 “… said (that)…”
Possible questions to ask about what people said
“Why did… say/ ask/ tell…?”
“How did you reply (to…)?”
“Did you agree about…?”
“Had you discussed… before?”
“What did you talk about after that?”
“What did… say (about…)?”
Useful language for playing the game
“I think… is false”
“You’re right”/ “Actually,… is false”
“Really? Why did…?”/ “I’m surprised. I didn’t think…”

Reported speech presentation 
What is the grammatical difference between “say (that)…” and “tell…(that)…”?/ Which one
takes a person as an object (… someone that…)?

What is the (big) difference in meaning between “told me that…” and “told me to…”?

What is the (small but important) difference in meaning between “ask someone to” and “tell
someone to”?

What kind of (direct) question needs “if/ whether” when it is changed into reported speech?
Why do you think we add that? Why don’t other kinds of questions need it?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

1

 In a bank
 In a bar
 In a café 
 In a car (e.g. a taxi)
 In a classroom
 In a hotel
 In a post office
 In a restaurant
 In a shop (e.g. in a duty free shop, in a department store or in a convenience store)
 In reception
 In someone else’s house/ In someone else’s garden
 In the elevator/ In the elevator hall
 In the street
 In tourist information
 In your office
 On a bus
 On a plane
 Staying at someone’s house
 The first day at…
 Trying to sell something
 Volunteering
 While gambling
 While taking part in a sport/ While taking part in a game

----------------------------------------------------------------------cut or fold---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Reported speech presentation suggested answers

What is the grammatical difference between “say (that)…” and “tell…(that)…”?/ Which one

takes a person as an object (… someone that…)?

-

“Tell” needs “someone”, e.g. “He told me that…”. “Say” doesn’t, meaning “He said me

that…” X is incorrect. 

What is the (big) difference in meaning between “told me that…” and “told me to…”?

-

“He told me to come” means “He ordered/ commanded/ instructed me to come”. “He

told me that…” means he gave me some information, making it the same as “He said

that… (to me)”.

What is the (small but important) difference in meaning between “ask someone to” and “tell

someone to”?

-

“He asked me to…” means “He requested…”, meaning he probably said something like

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

3

“Could you possibly…?”. “He told me to…” means he probably said something like

“Make sure that you…” or “I need you to…”

What kind of (direct) question needs “if/ whether” when it is changed into reported speech?

Why do you think we add that? Why don’t other kinds of questions need it?

-

Yes/ No questions like “Do you like cheese?” need “if/ whether”, e.g. in “He asked me

if/ whether I like(d) cheese”, perhaps because otherwise it wouldn’t be clear if it was a

question or not. Wh- questions retain their wh- word in the reported question, so it’s

clear that they are questions.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

4

Terms of Use

Lesson plans & worksheets can be used by teachers without any fee in the classroom; however, please ensure you keep all copyright information and references to UsingEnglish.com in place.

You will need Adobe Reader to view these files.

Get Adobe Reader