Requests & Responses- Games

Level: Intermediate

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (103 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Responding to requests games

1. Try your best to say no

In groups of two to four, one person must try to politely answer all requests negatively, 
giving a different reason why each time. 

How can you say yes and no to requests, and which ways are more polite?

2. Requests Answer Me

Circle one of the phrases below without showing anyone and request something in a way 
which you think will get that response from your partner. They must choose their response 
from the list below. If they actually answer using the phrase you have circled, you get one 
point.
 

“Maybe later”

“Okay, but just this once”

“I’m afraid I don’t have one/ any.”

“I would be my pleasure.”

“No problem. I’m going to do that later anyway.”

“It would probably be better to ask…”

“I’m sorry but I don’t know how to.”

“I’m/ You’re not allowed to.”/ “It’s not permitted.”

“That depends on…”

“Certainly. Here you are.”

“Of course. It’s over there. Help yourself.”

“I guess/ I suppose so.”

“Maybe, but I’ll need my boss’s permission.”

“That’s fine. Please do.”

“Unfortunately we’ve run out/ it’s out of stock“

“I'll do my best/ I'll do what I can/ I'll see what I can do”

“Okay, I’ll do it straightaway/ immediately.”

What other reasons could you use for refusing requests?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011

3. Responses to requests brainstorming and guessing game

Choose one of the requests below and brainstorm possible responses until you both/ all 
run out of ideas, then switch to another. The last person to come up with an idea each 
time gets a point.
 

“Do you mind if I sit down here?”

“If it’s not too much trouble, could you show me the way?”

“Could you possibly show me how to use the photocopier?”

“Sign here please.”

“Do you have a minute?”

“Could you spell that for me, please?”

“Can you hold the line, please?”

“Can you help me to move all this stuff upstairs?”

“Don’t move, I’ll be right back.”

“Would you mind getting me one too?”

“Do you have the time?”

“Would it be possible for you to make a rough estimate?”

“Can I leave a message?”

“Is it possible to have his mobile number?”

“Would it be okay for me to get back to you later on that?”

“Do you have a calculator that you could lend me?”

“Have you got an automatic pencil that I could borrow?”

“Have you got time to give me some feedback on my report?”

“I need some help with proofreading my PowerPoint slides.”

“I’d be (very) grateful if you could take my place in the next meeting.”

“I’d like to request time off for my brother’s wedding.”

“Could you tell me your boss’s contact details?”

“Would you mind putting me through to Mr Smith?”

Choose one of the requests above and tell your partner possible responses to that until 
they guess which one you are thinking of. Try not to use words from the phrase above in 
your responses. 

Choose one of the sentences above and continue the conversation as long as you can.  

Brainstorm a list of other things you often have to say no to and do the same as above.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011

4. Using excuses brainstorming and roleplays

What could you use these excuses to explain? Choose one, think of things it could be 
used as a reason for, and then roleplay a conversation with one of those situations. 

Lack of authority

Length of time needed

Deadline

Staff shortages

Not available

Rules/ regulations/ policies/ laws

Out of date

Updates

Technology

Documents/ Paperwork

Privacy

The time of year

The time of day

Delays

Equal opportunities

(Recent) changes

Building work/ Maintenance work

Code of conduct

Cultural norms/ Cultural differences

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2011