Shopping Dialogue- Jigsaw Text

Level: Beginner

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (93 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Shopping Dialogue- Jigsaw Text
Instructions for teachers
Photocopy and cut up one pack of cards per group of two to four students. Shuffle the 
cards and give them out to the groups. Ask students to put them in order to make a (= 
one) shop dialogue. To make it easier, you could suggest splitting them into customer 
cards and shop assistant cards and/ or cards at the beginning, middle and end of the 
conversation before they try to put them into order. You could also give them the 
“shop 
assistant” and “customer” headings at the top of the next page. 

If they need a further hint, you can tell them that only the third thing that is mentioned is 
bought (the first is too expensive, the second is too large, and the fourth is not available).  

When they think they have finished, let them see an un-cut-up version of the worksheet 
and/ or read out the whole dialogue so they can check their answers. There are then other
games they can play with the cards and un-cut-up worksheets:
-

One student reads out phrases and the others try to identify who is speaking

-

A   student   reads   out   one   of   the   phrases   and   their   partners   respond   as   quickly   as
possible

-

A student reads out one of the phrases, their partner responds, then they respond to
that, etc, continuing until they finish the conversation (naturally).

-

In a kind of disappearing text memory game, students take away the cards one by one
from   anywhere   in   the   dialogue   and   try   to   read   out   the   whole   dialogue   each   time,
including the missing bits. Other phrases not on the missing cards (and even extra
lines in the dialogue) are fine as long as the whole dialogue makes sense.

-

A student picks one card at random and the students work together to try to make a
whole conversation including the language on that card. The dialogue can be similar tot
or different from the original dialogue, as long as the sentence or sentences are used
naturally. Then they do the same with two cards, then with three cards, etc.

-

One student picks a staff card and the other chooses a customer card then they both
try to use their phrases during an improvised roleplay conversation. They change roles,
choose two different cards each and do the same. Students continue switching roles
and doing  the  same  with  more and  more  cards  each  time  until  the  whole  pack  is
finished or you stop the game. If students will find the game too difficult with cards
picked at random, spread the cards across the table face up and let them choose
which ones they want to use each time. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

1

Cards to cut up/ Suggested answers

Shop assistant

Customer

May I help you?

Yes, please. I’m looking for some boots.

Of course. What kind of boots would you

like?

Winter boots, size 7, please.

How about these ones?

Hmmm, they are a bit expensive. Do you

have anything else?

Of course. We also have those ones over

there. 

Hmmm. They look okay. What colours do

you have?

They are available in charcoal grey, purple,

or navy blue.

Blue sound best, I think. Can I try them

on?

Please take a seat and I’ll get some for

you. 

Okay. Thanks.

Sorry to keep you waiting. Here you are. 

Thanks. 

How are they?

They look good, but they are a little small.

Do you have a larger size?

Of course. I’ll get you a size 8. Would you

like to try them on too?

No, that’s okay, thanks. I’m sure they’re
fine. I’ll just take them in the larger size.

Great. Can I help you with anything else?

Actually, there is just one more thing. Do

you have flip flops?

I’m afraid they are out of stock at the

moment. Would you like to order some?

No, that’s okay, thanks. I’ll just take the

boots, then.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

2

Okay. That’s ninety nine dollars ninety

nine, please.

Okay. Do you take JCB cards?

I’m afraid not. Just Visa or Mastercard.

Oh, okay. I’ll pay cash, then. Here’s a

hundred.

Thanks. And here’s your change.

Thanks for your help. Have a nice day.

You too. Please come again. Bye.

Bye.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2017

3