Similarities and Differences Between Connecting Expressions- Card Game

A LESSON PLAN FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHERS

Level: Intermediate
Topic: General
Grammar Topic: General
Type: Lesson Plans
Submitted by:
Published: 6th Jan 2014

Below is a preview of the 'Similarities and Differences Between Connecting Expressions- Card Game' lesson plan and is automatically generated from the PDF file. While it will look close to the original, there may be formatting differences. It's provided to allow you to view the content of the lesson plan before you download the file.

      Page: /

Lesson Plan Text

Similarities and Differences Between Connecting Expressions- Card Game
Without looking below, put the words that you are given into groups by similarity.

Ask your teacher for clues, e.g. the number of groups and/ or the number of words in each 
group. 

Find words in each group which are most similar to each other and explain the differences in 
their use (grammatical – including word order – and/ or meaning). Apart from ones which are 
on one card, all the words in each group are different to each other in some way.
-------------------------------------------------------------
Hint 1: There are six categories.
Hint 2: The smallest group has just one two cards, and the largest group has seven, with the
others having the intermediate number of cards. 
-------------------------------------------------------------
Answer key/ Cards to cut up 
Cards next to each working from left to right along each row are related. The smallest category
is first. 

as/ because/ since

this is because/ the reason

for this is that

if

unless

when

e.g.

etc.

examples include

for example/ for instance/ to

give just one example

in the end

at last

lastly

finally

at the end

and

moreover

in addition

in addition to/ as well as

also

as well

…, but/ However,…

on the other hand

in contrast

whereas

although

nevertheless/ nonetheless

on the contrary

Which expressions above and you most and least likely to be able to use in academic writing,
e.g. your next homework? Which expressions above are rare in academic writing?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2014

Terms of Use

Lesson plans & worksheets can be used by teachers without any fee in the classroom; however, please ensure you keep all copyright information and references to UsingEnglish.com in place.

You will need Adobe Reader to view these files.

Get Adobe Reader