Speaker or Listener- Simplest Responses Game

Level: Beginner

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: General

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (117 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Speaker or Listener- Simplest Responses Game
Turn taking practice/ Active listening practice

Without looking below for now, listen to your teacher read out phrases used by the (main) 
speaker and the person listening and raise one of the two cards which you have given. If 
someone is interrupting (including giving the turn back at the end of the interruption) or 
refusing to speak, raise the 
“Listener” card. If you think both are possible, only raise the 
card of the person who you think more commonly uses that phrase. 

Label the sections below with S for (main) speaker or L for listener. The phrases in one 
section all have the same category, so if you aren’t sure about one phrase look at the ones
before or after it. 

Check your answers as a class. 

Play the same raising cards game in groups. 

Ask about any phrases which you don’t (fully) understand.

Without looking at the first worksheets, brainstorm suitable phrases into the spaces given 
on the brainstorming sheet. Many other suitable phrases are possible.

Use the first worksheet to check and expand on your answers, then brainstorm more. 

Check as a class or with the answer key. 

Test each other in groups:
-

Play the same raising cards game

-

Read out phrases until your partner identifies the function

-

Choose one function and help your partner make suitable phrases

As you discuss a topic, try to use as many of the functions cards as you can. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 1

Cards to hold up

(Main)

speaker

Listener

(Main)

speaker

Listener

(Main)

speaker

Listener

(Main)

speaker

Listener

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 2

Label the sections below with S for (main) speaker or L for listener.
 Can I just interrupt (for a minute)?
 Can I come in here (for a second)?
 Sorry, can I stop you there?
 Can I/ Could I (just) say something (here)?

 Yes, please go ahead.
 Go ahead, please have your say. 

 Right.
 Sure.

 Mmmm hmmm.
 Yeah (yeah) (yeah). 
 Yup (sure). 

 Of course.
 Good idea. 

 Got it.
 Okay.

 Now, where was I? Oh yes,…
 (Now) where were we? Oh yes,…
 What was I saying? Oh yes,…

 Sorry to interrupt, but…
 Sorry to stop you (in full flow), but…
 Sorry to butt in, but…

 Oh yeah?
 Really?

 Sorry, can I just finish what I’m saying?
 Sorry, can I just finish this one point?

 But you probably know more about this than me.
 But you might have another point of view. 

 Is that a fact?
 Is that right?
 (Do) you think so?

 Sure, and…
 Of course, but…
 Me too! In fact,…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 3

 That’s nothing! I…

 What do you think?
 What do you reckon?

 Do you agree?
 Do you feel the same way?

 I know (just) what you mean.
 I know!
 I see what you mean.

 Don’t you think so?
 Don’t you think?

 Absolutely!
 No kidding.

 I suppose so, yeah. 
 Makes sense. 

 If I can just (interrupt) (for a moment),…
 Before you go on,…
 I hate to interrupt (you) (in full flow), but…
 I’ll let you finish in a minute, but…

 Do you know what I mean?
 Know what I mean?

 If you know what I’m saying.
 If you know what I mean.

 Carry on.
 Go on.
 And then?

 So?
 So,… right?

 (That’s) no surprise.
 You don’t surprise me. 

 Are you?/ Is he?/ Is she?/ Are they?
 Did you?/ Did he?/ Did she?/ Did they?
 Do you?/ Does he?/ Does she?/ Do they?
 Were you?/ Was he?/ Was she?/ Were they?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 4

 To get back to what I was saying,…
 Anyway, as I was saying…

 And what’s more,…
 Furthermore,…
 In addition,…

 Honestly?/ Seriously?
 I don’t believe it!
 Do you (really) think so?
 I’m shocked!

 And that’s not all.
 Not only that, but…

 You’re joking?
 You’re kidding?

 (That’s) too bad.
 That’s a pity.
 That’s a shame. 

 Yes, what would you like to say?
 Yes, would you like to say something?

 You didn’t!/ He didn’t!/ She didn’t!
 You surprise me!

 …, right?
 Am I right?

 Just one more thing before you interrupt,…
 Just one more point before you have your say,…
 Before you comment, can I just say…?

 Sorry, please carry on.
 Sorry, please go on.

 Sorry, you were going to say?
 Sorry, you were saying?
 Sorry. What were you saying?

 I can’t add anything to that.
 I think you’ve covered everything.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 5

 I can see that you want to say something (about this), but can I just say…?
 I know you’re dying to jump in, but…

 I’m still thinking about what I want to say.
 I’m still just digesting what you said. 

 Which (just) about covers it.
 (I think) you get the idea. 
 That’s all I wanted to say.

 No no, you go on.
 Actually, I’ll let you finish (first). 
 No, it’s okay. I’ve forgotten what I was going to say.

 Sorry, I didn’t mean to interrupt. 
 Sorry, I thought you’d finished. 

 I was going to interrupt, but…
 That’s okay, you’ve already answered my question.

 Or am I wrong?
 Or not?

 And so on.
 I could go on.
 Sorry for waffling on. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 6

Brainstorming stage
Without looking above, brainstorm at least four suitable phrases into each of the gaps 
below. Many phrases not above are also okay.
Listener
Interrupting

Changing your mind about interrupting

Ending your interruption

Turning down the chance to speak

Active listening
Encouraging someone to continue

Showing you’re listening/ Not listening in silence
Positive phrases/ Positive reactions

Negative active listening phrases/ Negative reactions/ Reactions to negative things

Other showing you are listening phrases (not clearly positive or negative)

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 7

(Main) speaker
Allowing other people to speak/ Allowing people to interrupt

Stopping the other person interrupting

Signalling that you are going to continue what you are saying

Getting the turn back/ Getting the discussion back on track

Giving the other person the chance to comment/ Inviting the other person to 
comment

Signalling the end of your turn

Keeping the other person involved in what you are saying (without stopping)

Look above for two minutes, then turn over that worksheet and write down as many as you
can remember. Brainstorm more of your own ideas, then copy more from that worksheet.  

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 8

Suggested answers
Listener
Interrupting
 Can I just interrupt (for a minute)?
 Can I come in here (for a second)?
 Sorry, can I stop you there?
 Can I/ Could I (just) say something (here)?

 Sorry to interrupt, but…
 Sorry to stop you (in full flow), but…
 Sorry to butt in, but…

 If I can just (interrupt) (for a moment),…
 Before you go on,…
 I hate to interrupt (you) (in full flow), but…
 I’ll let you finish in a minute, but…

 Sure, and…
 Of course, but…
 Me too! In fact,…
 That’s nothing! I…

Changing your mind about interrupting
 No no, you go on.
 Actually, I’ll let you finish (first). 
 No, it’s okay. I’ve forgotten what I was going to say.

 Sorry, I didn’t mean to interrupt. 
 Sorry, I thought you’d finished. 

 I was going to interrupt, but…
 That’s okay, you’ve already answered my question.

Ending your interruption
 Sorry, please carry on.
 Sorry, please go on.

 Sorry, you were going to say?
 Sorry, you were saying?
 Sorry. What were you saying?

Turning down the chance to speak
 I can’t add anything to that.
 I think you’ve covered everything.

 I’m still thinking about what I want to say.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 9

 I’m still just digesting what you said. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 10

Active listening
Encouraging someone to continue
 Carry on.
 Go on.
 And then?

 So?
 So,… right?

Showing you’re listening/ Not listening in silence
Positive phrases/ Positive reactions
 Right.
 Sure.

 Mmmm hmmm.
 Yeah (yeah) (yeah). 
 Yup (sure). 

 Of course.
 Good idea. 

 Got it.
 Okay.

 I know (just) what you mean.
 I know!
 I see what you mean.

 Absolutely!
 No kidding.

 I suppose so, yeah. 
 Makes sense. 

 (That’s) no surprise.
 You don’t surprise me. 

Negative active listening phrases/ Negative reactions/ Reactions to negative things
 Oh yeah?
 Really?

 Is that a fact?
 Is that right?
 (Do) you think so?

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 11

 Honestly?/ Seriously?
 I don’t believe it!
 Do you (really) think so?
 I’m shocked!

 You’re joking?
 You’re kidding?

 You didn’t!/ He didn’t!/ She didn’t!
 You surprise me!

 (That’s) too bad.
 That’s a pity.
 That’s a shame. 

Other showing you are listening phrases (not clearly positive or negative)
 Are you?/ Is he?/ Is she?/ Are they?
 Did you?/ Did he?/ Did she?/ Did they?
 Do you?/ Does he?/ Does she?/ Do they?
 Were you?/ Was he?/ Was she?/ Were they?

(Main) speaker
Allowing other people to speak/ Allowing people to interrupt
 Yes, please go ahead.
 Go ahead, please have your say. 

 Yes, what would you like to say?
 Yes, would you like to say something?

Stopping the other person interrupting
 Sorry, can I just finish what I’m saying?
 Sorry, can I just finish this one point?

 Just one more thing before you interrupt,…
 Just one more point before you have your say,…
 Before you comment, can I just say…?

 I can see that you want to say something (about this), but can I just say…?
 I know you’re dying to jump in, but…

Signalling that you are going to continue what you are saying
 And that’s not all.
 Not only that, but…

 And what’s more,…
 Furthermore,…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 12

 In addition,…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 13

Getting the turn back/ Getting the discussion back on track
 Now, where was I? Oh yes,…
 (Now) where were we? Oh yes,…
 What was I saying? Oh yes,…

 To get back to what I was saying,…
 Anyway, as I was saying…

Giving the other person the chance to comment/ Inviting the other person to 
comment
 But you probably know more about this than me.
 But you might have another point of view. 

 What do you think?
 What do you reckon?

 Do you agree?
 Do you feel the same way?

 Don’t you think so?
 Don’t you think?

 …, right?
 Am I right?

 Or am I wrong?
 Or not?

Signalling the end of your turn
 And so on.
 I could go on.
 Sorry for waffling on. 

 Which (just) about covers it.
 (I think) you get the idea. 
 That’s all I wanted to say.

Keeping the other person involved in what you are saying (without stopping)
 Do you know what I mean?
 Know what I mean?

 If you know what I’m saying.
 If you know what I mean.

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 14

Speaker and listener functions card game
Use as many cards below as you can by doing that thing during a speaking activity. If you 
use the same card as has been used before, you must use a different phrase (i.e. no 
repeating phrases). Note that making sounds does not count as an active listening phrase 
and that if you speak during silence it doesn’t count as interrupting.  

active listening

active listening

active listening

active listening

active listening

active listening

active listening

active listening

interrupting

interrupting

interrupting

interrupting

interrupting

interrupting

allowing others to speak/ finishing allowing others to speak/ finishing

allowing others to speak/ finishing allowing others to speak/ finishing

allowing others to speak/ finishing allowing others to speak/ finishing

(politely) stopping interruption

(politely) stopping interruption

(politely) stopping interruption

(politely) stopping interruption

getting the turn back/ back on

track

getting the turn back/ back on

track

getting the turn back/ back on

track

getting the turn back/ back on

track

turning down the chance to speak turning down the chance to speak

turning down the chance to speak turning down the chance to speak

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2018

p. 15