Strong & Weak Opinions

Level: Intermediate

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Functions & Text

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (99 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Strong and Weak Opinions
Without looking at the list below, listen to your teacher and raise the Strong or Weak card 
that you have been given depending on which meaning you think each phrase you hear 
has.

----------------------------------------------

Label the sections below with S for Strong and W for Weak. Brackets () mean that the 
phrase is also strong or weak without those words. 

You could say that.
You could be right.
You may be right.
You might be right. 

I really think that…
I strongly believe that…
I’d definitely say that…
I’m (absolutely) certain that…

I’m positive that…
In my honest opinion,… 
To be (perfectly) frank,…

I can’t agree.
I really don’t agree.
Are you joking?/ Are you kidding?
There’s no way I can accept that. 

I feel more or less the same way.
I guess you’re right.
I might be able to accept that.

I couldn’t agree with you more.
That’s exactly the point I was trying to make.
I feel exactly the same way.
I totally agree.

I don’t really agree.
I don’t think I agree.

I suppose you’re right.
That seems to make sense. 
I partially agree.
I partly agree.

In my humble opinion,…
I’d guess that…
I’m no expert (on this), but…

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

In my limited experience,…
This is just my opinion, but…
I’m not sure, but I think…

To the best of my knowledge,…
As far as I know,…
I’d probably say that…/

You took the words right out of my mouth. 
That’s exactly what I was going to say.
You’re absolutely right.
That makes complete sense. 

Label the sections above by their function (agreeing, disagreeing and giving opinions)

Test each other in small groups, including some examples without the words in brackets. 

Make shorter versions of the phrases above for your partner to make stronger or weaker 
versions of (either is okay). The shorter versions should also be correct phrases for giving 
opinions. 

Use the worksheet that your teacher gives you to continue that activity (working together 
or testing each other as your teacher tells you). 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Without looking above, make these phrases stronger and/ or weaker. (Both are possible 
with almost all). 

I agree (with you).

You’re right.

I feel the same way.

I don’t agree. 

I believe that… 

I think that…

In my opinion,… 

I’d say that…

In my experience,…

That makes sense.

Use the answers below the fold to check your answers and/ or test your partner. 
------------------------
Suggested answers

Answers are arranged:
Starting phrase – Stronger (/Stronger/ Stronger) – Weaker (/Weaker/ Weaker)

I agree (with you). – I couldn’t agree with you more./ I totally agree. – I partly agree./ I 
partially agree. 
You’re right – You’re absolutely right./ - I guess you’re right./ I suppose you’re right./ You 
could be right./ You may be right./ You might be right.   
I feel the same way – I feel exactly the same way. – I feel more or less the same way. 
I don’t agree. – I really don’t agree./ I can’t agree. – I don’t really agree./ I don’t think I 
agree. 
I believe that… - I strongly believe that…
I think that… - I really think that… - I’m not sure, but I think that…
In my opinion,… - In my honest opinion,… - In my humble opinion,…/ This is just my 
opinion, but…
I’d say that… - I definitely say that… - I’d guess that…/ I’d probably say that…
In my experience – In my extensive experience,… – In my limited experience,…/ I don’t 
have much experience of this, but…
That makes sense. – That makes complete sense. – That seems to make sense.

Underline words above that are generally used to make opinions stronger or weaker. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Choose one of the topics below. Start with one of you arguing strongly for and one of you 
arguing strongly against and try to slowly move together in some way, e.g. by one of you 
being convinced or by finding a compromise position. 
Headlines vocabulary

Boycotting countries like North Korea/ Encouraging free trade with countries like North 
Korea

More aid for developing countries/ More free trade with developing countries

Bidding for more international sporting events/ Bidding for fewer international sporting 
events

Longer and more prison sentences/ Shorter and fewer prison sentences

Media

Protection for local filmmakers/ Letting the market decide

More controls on media organisations and journalists/ More freedom for media organi-
sations and journalists

More control over what can be put on the internet/ No control over what can be put on 
the internet

Economics/ Society

Encouraging companies to keep on their older staff/ Encouraging companies to recruit 
more young people

More pressure on companies to employ people on permanent contracts/ More free-
dom for companies to hire and fire to match their business needs

More benefits for older people/ Older people being more expected to pay for them-
selves

Increasing spending on health/ Increasing spending on education

Increasing immigration/ Reducing immigration

Prioritising increasing the birth rate/ Prioritising dealing with a shrinking population

The government setting a minimum number of women on boards of large companies/ 
Complete freedom for organisations to choose the best candidate

Getting more mothers back to work/ Subsidising families so mothers can afford to stay 
at home and look after their children

Economics

Forcing power companies to use more renewable energy/ Allowing the market and 
consumer pressure to decide

Encouraging investment by foreign hedge funds/ Discouraging investment by foreign 
hedge funds

Encouraging mergers with large foreign companies/ Discouraging mergers with large 
foreign companies

Cutting government spending now/ Only cutting government spending when the econ-
omy improves

Raising corporation tax/ Reducing corporation tax

More government help for failing companies and industries/ Allowing failing companies
and industries to die naturally

Aiming for more inflation/ Aiming for as close to zero inflation as possible

Aiming for a strong currency/ Aiming for a weak currency

Increasing the minimum wage/ Scrapping the minimum wage

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Trying to improve the country’s food self-sufficiency/ Freeing up the market in agricul-
tural products

Education

More English in primary schools/ Starting English later

Raising the number of people going to university/ Encouraging people to take courses 
more vocational courses

More hours studying English in school/ More variety of languages studied at school

Standardisation of education/ More freedom for teachers, schools and universities to 
run things they way they want

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

Cards for students to hold up

Copy and cut out one of each card per student

Strong

Weak

Strong

Weak

Strong

Weak

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013