UK and US Political Vocabulary and Political Systems

Level: Intermediate

Topic: Politics

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (93 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

UK and US political vocabulary and political systems
Are the things below about the UK/ USA/ both? (Most are only about one of those 
countries)
Backbenches/ Backbenchers
Buck House
Buckingham Palace
Cabinet
Camp David
Chancellor (of the Exchequer)
Chequers
Coalition government
Confirmation hearings
Congress
Cross-bench
Downing Street
Filibustering
Foreign Secretary
Governor
Heir to the throne
Her Majesty’s Government
Home Secretary
House of Commons
House of Lords
House of Representatives
Houses of Parliament
Independent candidates
Labour (= The Labour Party)
Leader of the House
Leader of the Opposition
Mayor
Member of Parliament
Monarch
MP
MEP
Number 10
Number 11
Peers
PM
President
Primaries
Prime Minister
Senate
Speaker
Supreme Court
Term limits
The Conservatives (= The Conservative Party)
The Constitution

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

The Democrats (= The Democratic Party)
The GOP
The Palace of Westminster
The Queen’s Speech
The Republicans (= The Republican Party)
The right to bear arms
The First Amendment
The Tories
The White House
Two-party system
Westminster
Whips
Whitehall

Which things above are different words for the same thing?

Which things in different systems are more or less equivalent?

These things have different meanings in the two countries. What are they?
Red
Blue
Conservative
Liberal

Which country’s system seems more similar to your country’s? What are the similarities 
and differences?

Try to explain your own country’s political system. 

Explain what you know about these recent political stories, using vocabulary from above if 
you like. 

Barack Obama’s re-election campaign

Cash for honours

Cash for questions

Mitt Romney

Reform of the House of Lords

The coalition government

The Hutton Enquiry/ The Smoking Gun

The parliamentary expenses scandal

The phone hacking scandal

The Tea Party

Do the same for recent political stories from your country. 

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013

UK and US political vocabulary and political systems
Answer key
Backbenches/ Backbenchers - UK
Buck House/ Buckingham Palace – UK 
Cabinet – Both (though only the UK has a real cabinet system)
Camp David – US equivalent to Chequers - UK
Chancellor (of the Exchequer) - UK
Coalition government - UK
Confirmation hearings - US
Cross-bench - UK
Downing Street/ Number 10 – UK equivalent to White House - US
Filibustering – both (though only formally part of the debates in the US)
Foreign Secretary - UK
Governor – US (though most British overseas territories and Commonwealth countries still 
have governors)
Heir to the throne - UK
Her Majesty’s Government - UK
Home Secretary - UK
House of Commons – UK equivalent to House of Representatives - US
House of Lords – UK equivalent to Senate - US
Houses of Parliament/ Westminster/ The Palace of Westminster – UK equivalent to 
Congress - US
Independent candidates - both
Labour (= The Labour Party) equivalent to the Democrats - US
Leader of the House - US
Leader of the Opposition - UK
Mayor - both
Member of Parliament/ MP - UK
Monarch - UK
MEP - UK
Number 11 - UK
Peers - UK
PM/ Prime Minister – UK 
President - US
Primaries - US
Speaker - both
Supreme Court - both
Term limits - US
The Conservatives (= The Conservative Party)/ The Tories – UK equivalent to 
Republicans/ GOP - US
The Constitution - US
The Queen’s Speech - UK
The right to bear arms - US
The First Amendment - US
Two-party system – US (though the UK system usually works out that way)
Whips - UK
Whitehall - UK

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2013