Used To Practice- Old Expressions

Level: Intermediate

Topic: General

Grammar Topic: Vocabulary

Submitted by:

Type: Lesson Plans

      Page: /       Download PDF (80 KB)

Lesson Plan Text

Old expressions and meanings Used to practice

Why do we say these things? (All are related to outdated actions/ history.)

“hang up” and “pick up” for telephones

“turn on” and “turn off” the television

“get on/ off” (not “get in/ out of”) the bus

“speak to you later” (not “See you later”) for video conferences and web conferences

“baker’s dozen” for thirteen

“big wig” for someone important

“blue blooded” for posh/ aristocratic

“don’t look a gift horse in the mouth” for not thinking too much about a great opportunity

“hair of the dog” for drinking alcohol to take away your hangover

“get the sack” for losing your job

“CC (carbon copy)” for sending your email to other people

Choose one of the things above and take turns telling a story about its origins. The person 
with the most imaginative story wins. 

Do you think the following language is out of date or still used?

Walkman

Record shop

Video shop

Bell boy

Dear Sir

Dear Mrs Smith

Dear Mr and Mrs Smith

Mr and Mrs Roger Smith

Dearest James

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2012

Old expressions and meanings Used to practice
Suggested answers

Why do we say these things? (All are related to outdated actions/ history)

“hang  up”  and  “pick  up”  for  telephones  –  The  earpiece  of  the  oldest  telephones  (as 
seen in Mary Poppins etc) used to hang on the wall. 

“turn on” and “turn off” the television – Old on/ off buttons needed turning. 

“get on/ off” (not “get in/ out of”) the bus – Perhaps because buses didn’t used to have 
roofs?

“speak to you later” (not “See you later”) for video conferences and web conferences – 
It comes from telephone calls where you couldn’t see the person

“baker’s dozen” for thirteen – Bakers used to bake an extra loaf each time

“big wig” for someone important – The most important people used to wear the biggest 
wigs

“blue blooded” for posh/ aristocratic – Rich people used to have very white skin due to 
not having to go outside and so you could see their veins

“don’t  look  a  gift  horse  in  the  mouth”  for  not  thinking  too  much  about  a  great 
opportunity – People used to check the health of horses by looking at their teeth and 
hooves, so the saying means that if something is a gift you shouldn’t do that but just 
take it

“hair  of  the  dog”  for  drinking  alcohol  to  take  away  your  hangover  –  Doctors  used  to 
recommend  drinking  a  potion  with  a  hair  from  the  dog  that  bit  you  to  avoid  getting 
diseases such as rabies from it. 

“get  the  sack”  for  losing  your  job  –  Workmen  were  given  a  sack  to  take  their  tools 
away in when they lost their jobs. 

“CC  (carbon  copy)”  for  sending  your  email  to  other  people  –  People  used  to  make 
copies of letters for their boss etc by putting carbon paper between the sheets

Do you think the following language is out of date or still used?

Walkman – Pretty much out of date. Some people used it for more recent technology 
too, but “mp3 (player)” and “iPod” are much more common

Record shop – Still very common. Few people say “CD shop” and “music shop” could 
have other meanings

Video shop – Still very common. 

Bell boy – Common in speech, but the official title is usually “porter”

Dear Sir – Still quite common, especially in America

Dear  Mrs  Smith  – Okay  in  personal  communication  but  only  used  in  business  if  she 
refers to herself as “Mrs”

Dear  Mr  and  Mrs  Smith  –  Still  okay,  although  some  people  wonder  why  “Mr”  comes 
first

Mr and Mrs Roger Smith – A bit old fashioned but can still be seen

Dearest James – Old fashioned and very rare

Written by Alex Case for UsingEnglish.com © 2012