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  1. #1
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    Smile Use it as you see fit.

    What do you think is the part of speech of as in the example: Use it as you see fit.
    I think it acts more like a relative pronoun than a simple conjunction, but then can it be used as such?

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    Re: Use it as you see fit.

    Quote Originally Posted by yuriya View Post
    What do you think is the part of speech of as in the example: Use it as you see fit.
    I think it acts more like a relative pronoun than a simple conjunction, but then can it be used as such?
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Good morning, Yuriya.

    (1) What an interesting thought: that "as" could be considered a

    relative pronoun in that particular sentence.

    (2) Why don't we replace the pronoun with a noun and then consider

    this idea:

    I am going to give you, my favorite niece, one million dollars. You

    may use this money as you see fit.

    (a) Use the money as you see fit.

    (3) Why do you think "as" is being used as a relative pronoun?

    (a) Perhaps someone who really understands grammar will reply, and

    then we both can learn. I am very interested.

    Have a nice day!

  3. #3
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    Re: Use it as you see fit.

    ---Not a Teacher---
    In English, relative pronouns are who, whom, which, whose, and that.
    A relative pronoun links two clauses into a single complex clause. It is similar in function to a subordinating conjunction. Unlike a conjunction, however, a relative pronoun stands in place of a noun. Compare:
    (1) This is a house. Jankie built this house.
    (2) This is the house that Jankie built.
    Sentence (2) consists of two clauses, a main clause (This is the house) and a relative clause (that Jack built). The word that is a relative pronoun. Within the relative clause, the relative pronoun stands for the noun phrase it references in the main clause (its antecedent), which is one of the arguments of the verb in the relative clause. In the example, the argument is the house, the direct object of built. Note the word "that" appears twice in the prior sentence, but the first is a demonstrative pronoun.
    Other arguments can be relativised using relative pronouns:
    Subject: Hunter is the boy who kissed Monique.
    Indirect object: Hunter is the boy to whom Monique gave a gift.
    Adpositional complement: Jack built the house in which I now live. (and similarly with prepositions and prepositional phrases in general, eg These are the walls in between which Jack ran.)
    Possessor: Jack is the boy whose friend built my house.

    Conclusion: "as" acts as a conjunction in my opinion.

    Looking forward to see more answers to it.

  4. #4
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    Re: Use it as you see fit.

    Use the money as you see fit.

    When I came across this sentence, I felt that something was missing. As I thought it over, I realized it was the object of see fit that was missing. I believed the missing object was the money, which was the reason for this query. Silly me! Now I see the object is to use the money, which was omitted due to the repetition.

    Nevertheless, I tried googling and found something interesting. It is about something called quasi-relative pronouns. If interested, check this out. quasi-relative pronoun ? - WordReference Forums

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