Apart from the overtime pay, he is also

Oceanlike

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I don't know whether I should use "also" when I use "Apart from".

(a) Apart from the overtime pay, he is (also) given meal allowance.

(b) Apart from participating in the regional tournament, he is (also) shortlisted for the national games.

I feel that "also" can be left out because of the meaning of "apart from". What is correct?
 

emsr2d2

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I don't know whether I should use "also" when I use "Apart from".

(a) [STRIKE]Apart from[/STRIKE] As well as/In addition to [STRIKE]the[/STRIKE] overtime pay, he is [STRIKE](also)[/STRIKE] given a meal allowance.
(b) [STRIKE]Apart from[/STRIKE] As well as/In addition to participating in the regional tournament, he is [STRIKE](also)[/STRIKE] shortlisted for the national games.

I feel that "also" can be left out because of the meaning of "apart from". What is correct?

You're right that "also" can be omitted but "Apart from" doesn't work at the start of either sentence. See my suggestions above.
 

Oceanlike

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but "Apart from" doesn't work at the start of either sentence. See my suggestions above.

I don't understand why "apart from" doesn't work at the start of the two sentences.
 

jutfrank

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I don't understand why "apart from" doesn't work at the start of the two sentences.

The phrase apart from has a basic sense of exclusion. It doesn't work well in your sentence.

The meaning of your sentence requires a phrase that has a sense of addition, such as in addition to, along with, as well as, besides, etc.
 

Oceanlike

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How about "Besides"? Can I omit "also"?

(1) Besides overtime pay, he is given a meal allowance.

(2) Besides participating in the regional tournament, he is shortlisted for the national games.
 

Tarheel

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I don't like "Besides" there. You have been given several good suggestions. I suggest you use one of them.
 

Oceanlike

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You may not like it, but I just want to learn whether it can be used in the same manner. I would appreciate if someone can teach me if "besides" can be used in the same manner.
 

jutfrank

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Yes, besides is good for a sense of addition. It also works well with also.

Besides overtime pay, he is also given a meal allowance. :tick:
 
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