[Grammar] better than 'before'

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vpkannan

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Hi,

'We can do better than before.'

Is the above sentence correct with the usage of 'better than' followed by 'before'? Usually, (better) than is followed by a noun / pronoun, but here, 'before', an adverb, is used. Is it fine? If so, please explain the sentence structure.

Thanks.
 
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Rover_KE

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Your sentence is fine.

Before can be used in the following ways:
as a conjunction (connecting two clauses): Think carefully before you choose.
as a preposition (followed by a noun): We’ll finish the project before Christmas.
as an adverb (without a following noun): I’d met him once before.
(Macmillan)
 

tzfujimino

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We can do better than (we could) before.


'we could' is implied.

:)
 

Matthew Wai

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I think 'than' can also sometimes be followed by an adjective, as in 'more dead than alive'.
 
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