Can I change money with you? I need to change my bill into some coins.

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Jit833

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1) Hi, I'm just wondering if I can change money for some coins at this store?
2) Can I change money with you? I need to change my bill into some coins.



Are the above sentences correct?
 

emsr2d2

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1) Hi, I'm just wondering if I can change money for some coins at this store?
2) Can I change money with you? I need to change my bill into some coins.

Are the above sentences correct?

They would both be understood.

In BrE, we don't use "bills", we use "notes" for paper money. However, you don't need to use either. If you walked into any shop in the UK and said "I don't suppose/I'm just wondering if ... you can give me some change, can you?", they would know what you meant. Even better, specify the denomination of the note you want to change, for example "Can you change ten pounds for me?" It is possible that you might just want two five-pound notes, but usually the person in the shop will either say "No, sorry, I can't" or "Yes, how do you want it?" meaning "What combination of notes and/or coins would you like?"
 

konungursvia

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In Canada, I wouldn't ask whether someone can give you some change, as it may be interpreted as begging. I prefer the question "do you have change for a five?" or something along those lines.
 

BobK

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:up: Or you could just avoid the word altogether: 'Can you give me five 10s for a 50?' [meaning five 10p pieces for a 50p piece].

b
 
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emsr2d2

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:up: Or you could just avoid the word altogether: 'Can you give me five 10s for a 50?' [meaning five 10p pieces for a 50p piece].

b

That works if you're swapping coins for smaller coins.

Can you give me five pound coins for a five-pound note?
 

BobK

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:up: Or, if it's all notes, 'Can you give me four fives for a twenty'. No need to mention the pounds. (But as Ems says, if you're changing media - notes for coins or vice versa - you need to specify.)

b
 
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